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6

Hope this helpful to you CGRect frame = CGRectMake(0, 0, 0, 0); cv::Rect roi; roi.x = frame.origin.x; roi.y = frame.origin.y; roi.width = frame.size.width; roi.height = frame.size.height;


6

cv::eigen assumes that the input matrix is symetric, and yours is not. that is why the difference is there. I believe openCV does not have support for eigenvectors of non-symmetric matrices, you may need to use another library. Update: PCA (principal component analysis) is an eigenvector decomposition, so you may be able to go that way, but the best ...


5

Short answer: temporal low-pass filter on illumination as a whole Consider the illumination, conceptually, as a time sequence of values representing something like the light flux impinging upon the scene being photographed. Your ideal situation is that this function be constant, but the second-best situation is that it vary as slowly as possible. A low-pass ...


4

This has come up a few times before on SO but I've never seen a full answer, so here goes. The implementation shown here is based on this paper which derives the full equations: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/zhang/papers/tr03-39.pdf Essentially, it shows that assuming a pinhole camera model, it is possible to calculate the aspect ratio for a ...


4

As it is seen in your screenshot you are building your project with VS2010 compiler (vc10) but your opencv libraries are built with vc11, which makes C++ run-time incompatible. You either need to build your project with vc11 (VS2012) or get opencv built with vc10 toolchain And BTW you don't need C:\Program Files (x86)\Qt\Tools\mingw492_32\bin\ in your path ...


4

See the sample code at page 155 of Learning Image Processing with OpenCV. Something like this: vector<CameraParams> cameras; vector<MatchesInfo> pairwise_matches; vector<ImageFeatures> features(num_images); // initialize the above params here Ptr<BundleAdjusterBase> adjuster; adjuster = makePtr<BundleAdjusterReproj>(); if (!(*...


4

Try the following code, Hopefully it should work: Mat img1=some_img; Mat img2=some_img; Mat dest; cv::subtract(img1,img2,dest); This performs pixelwise subtraction (img1-img2). find more details about it http://docs.opencv.org/modules/core/doc/operations_on_arrays.html


3

use cv::waitKey() after imshow. This is needed to proceed openCV rendering. use waitKey(0) to pause until a key is pressed or waitKey(1) to pause as short as possible.


3

The name of the project ConsoleApplication2 so I'm going to assume that you used the Visual Studio project template for "Console Application". That template sets \SUBSYSTEM:CONSOLE option which means that the program wants to start with a function that has the signature int main(int argc, char* argv[]) So you need to change that option to /SUBSYSTEM:...


3

The problem is caused by this line in the OpenCV source code: #define MAX_CAMERAS 8 Simply changing the MAX_CAMERAS value and rebuilding OpenCV solves the problem. The file to change is modules/highgui/src/cap_libv4l.cpp (line 260) for a libv4l build, and cap_v4l.cpp for a v4l build. (See, e.g., this answer for more on the two build options.) For ...


3

My answer assumes that you use a specific 3D object, whose dimensions are known accurately, to estimate the intrinsic parameters of one camera from multiple images of the object. In light of your comment to @fireant 's answer, I think this applies to your question. Quick note on the meanings of 'camera matrix' The term 'camera matrix' is very vague and can ...


3

If you want to split your image using Numpy functions, take a look at numpy.array_split. In your case you would write something like this: z = {} count = 0 split1 = np.array_split(img, rh) for sub in split1: split2 = np.array_split(sub, rw, 1) for sub2 in split2: z[count] = sub2 count++


3

According to the document, cv::String has a constructor taking one std::string as its parameter, which means std::string could be implicitly converted to cv::String.


3

I face the same issues recently, to solve this problem(simple and fast algorithm to compare two images) once and for all, I contribute an img_hash module to opencv_contrib, you can find the details from this link. img_hash module provide six image hash algorithms, quite easy to use. Codes example origin lena blur lena resize lena shift lena #include &...


3

Warping one of the two images in the coordinate frame of the other is more common because it is easier: one can directly compute the 2D warping transformation from image correspondences. Warping both images into a new coordinate frame is possible but more complex, because it involves 3D transformations and require to accurately define a new 3D coordinate ...


3

The article you point to is from 2007! It's awfully outdated (though still relevant since TBB keeps all the source compatibility). The tbb::task interface is considered low-level and it is not that convenient for application development. Please refer to tbb::parallel_for, tbb::parallel_invoke, and in particular to tbb::task_group which has direct support for ...


2

I solved this myself.This was an issue with OpenCV Engine.Downloaded OpenCV engine from https://github.com/thumbor/opencv-engine/releases/tag/1.0.1 and save it as engine.py in \Python27\Lib\site-packages. used cv2.cv instead of cv2.cv as cv.


2

I solved the problem myself. I was trying to load a 32-bit dll from a 64-bit process, that's why it doesn't worked out. Finally I am able to fix it by using a 64-bit dll.


2

To change camera at run time all you need to change is the index you pass in cv2.VideoCapture(index). Find out how many camera you will be using for your app and for 3 cameras, you can change it through changing index to 0 or 1 or 2. Add one more parameter as index show_webcam(mirror=True, index) in function side you can use this def show_webcam(mirror=...


2

Your image shape returns 3 dimensions im.shape >>> (24, 28, 3) If you only want the first 2 do: w, h = im.shape[:-1] >>> (24, 28) or w, h, _ = im.shape # w is 24, h is 28 Because otherwise, you are trying to unpack 3 values into only 2 variables, that won't work in Python hence your error. The _ is like a convention in Python for ...


2

I managed to solve it. Thanks to @Matt and @Yamaneko. Basically, I moved the block that reads the image into the worker function. Therefore, if the pool size = 6 and there are six bounding boxes, each frame is going to be read six times (within each worker). That's the only way I have found to make it work. Current version can be found here. import cv2 as ...


2

Usual practice is to resize input images before feeding them to classifier, because you have fixed number of inputs, you need fixed dimentionality of features, in your case features are pixel intensities, so, number of pixels in your input image must be fixed.


2

You don't need to include OpenCV in .cu file. You need a Caller API with raw pointers and basic data types as parameters. main.cpp #include "opencv2/opencv.hpp" #include "medianFilter.h" int main() { cv::Mat inputMat = cv::imread(); ..... cudaMedianCaller (d_inputMat, d_kernelMat); ..... return 0; } medianFilter.h cudaMedianCaller (uchar3* ...


2

Although the net result of the two operations is the same, the first one is more costly: m1.row(i) creates a Mat object representing row i, then col(j) is called on the Mat returned from m1.row(i) to get a single-element Mat representing object at (i, j) The same sequence of operations is applied to m2 The two Mat objects are compared with == Four ...


2

I had the same issue.This was an issue with OpenCV Engine.Download OpenCV engine from https://github.com/thumbor/opencv-engine/releases/tag/1.0.1 and save it as engine.py in \Python27\Lib\site-packages.use cv2.cv instead of cv2.cv as cv.


2

For python api - try this link (https://matthewearl.github.io/2015/07/28/switching-eds-with-python/) For C++ - http://dlib.net/train_shape_predictor_ex.cpp.html sample has code for estimating interocular distance: double interocular_distance ( const full_object_detection& det ) { dlib::vector<double,2> l, r; double cnt = 0; // ...


2

There are multiple ways to go about detecting text in an image. I recommend looking at this question here, for it may answer your case as well. Although it is not in python, the code can be easily translated from c++ to python (Just look at the API and convert the methods from c++ to python, not hard. I did it myself when I tried their code for my own ...


2

If signal change is global you should try to calculate mean m(i,t) for each line i in each image at time t in your video. Without fluctuating light ratio m(i,t)/m(i,t+1) must be 1 for all time. If there is a global change then for each i m(i,t)/m(i,t+1) must be constant. it's better to use mean value m(i,t)/m(i,t+1) (for all i). This mean value could be use ...


2

i have used SIFT algo in python and at some point of time have researched over it for improving the accuracy. Here are some of the points that i could collate as far as i remember: The number of "interesting" features will always depend on the object that you are using it to detect. if the object has very random edges, then the key points detected will be ...


2

What is the problem with using a std::string directly ? imread works fine for me when I write something along the lines of std::string filename = "Path/to/img.jpg"; cv::Mat img = cv::imread(filename);



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