Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

First of all, (probably this is not your case, as you pointed out that you are working on a video and not a camera) if you base your code on the value of the frame rate, be sure that 30fps is the effective value and not the maximum one. Sometimes cameras automatically adjust that number based on the amount of light they get from the environment. If it is ...


5

Your first gpu measurement is far from the others,i've experienced the same thing. The first call to an opencv kernel (erode/dilate/etc...) is longer than the others following. In an application, while we initializes GPU memory, we have made a first call to cv::gpu::XX in order to not having this measurement noise. I've also seen that cv::gpu uses ...


5

You can use getDerivKernels to determine the kernel coefficients for the Sobel filter if you really want to see what OpenCV uses. What you need to do is specify which direction you want and the size of the mask you want. As such, there are two directions per size of the kernel, so we need to call this four times. However, what is returned are the ...


5

The left cat consists of the odd numbered lines and the right cat consists of the even numbered lines of the original picture. This is then doubled, so that there are two more cats underneath. The new cats have half the number of lines of the original cat. The new picture is laid out like this: line 1 line 2 line 3 line 4 line 5 line 6 ... line n-1 ...


4

Actually, they are NOT the same even without mask. The major difference is that when the destination matrix and the source matrix have the same type and size, copyTo will not change the address of the destination matrix, while clone will always allocate a new address for the destination matrix. This is important when the destination matrix is copied using ...


4

In your posted example numpy and cv2 are working as expected. Indexing or Slicing in numpy, just as in python in general, is 0 based and of the form [a, b), i.e. not including b. Recreate your example: >>> import numpy as np >>> arr = np.arange(1,26).reshape(5,5) >>> arr array([[ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [ 6, 7, 8, 9, 10], ...


4

Most of OpenCV is, in fact, much faster than the naive approach! For convolutions, they often use one of these two fundamental optimizations: Separable convolution. Takes advantage of the "associative property of convolution" for certain types of kernels. For an M-by-N image and P-by-Q kernel, the naive approach is M*N*P*Q. If the kernel is separable ...


4

First note that there is only one parameter here, namely the distance t along the ray at which it hits the mirror. For any test value of t, compute in order The point at which reflection occurs. The vectors of the incident and reflected rays. The normal vector of the mirror, which is found by taking the mean of the normalized incident and reflected ...


4

Generally, as a rule of thumb, the more different the background color from all the other colors, the easier it is to split the image into fore- and background. In such a case, as @Chris already suggested, it is possible to use a simple chroma key implementation. Below is my quick implementation of the keying described on Wikipedia (it's written in C++ but ...


4

Matlab's gradient algorithm is somehow different than the Sobel filtering. For a detailed algorithm that is used for Matlab, take a look at here. So you can implement that algorithm easily in OpenCV like this: //image is your input image, I assume it is of float type //xGradient is the gradient output calculated along x-direction //yGradient is the ...


3

How about: A.row(1).setTo(Scalar(value));


3

cv::Mat doesn't have a contructor that accepts a string. Use imread instead. Since imread accepts std::string, not QString, just do: cv::Mat yourImage = cv::imread(filename.toStdString());


3

The answer is basically in the README.md file, but I'll spell it out here. You will need to set either the platform.dependency system property to the desired platform, for example, macosx-x86_64, or to true the platform.dependencies one, to get dependencies for all platforms. I'm not sure how we're supposed to set that with JUnit Spring (it should be in the ...


3

I met the same question today. And I happen to see your question by Google. I have two desktops with VS 2008; the former one I use seems to be OK (I will check it out later, not at hand for the moment), but the one I am using now just couldn't make it. The only thing I can remember is that, is there a SP1-upgrade to your VS 2008? If my memory serves ...


3

In the comments, I see that you are opting to train your own face landmark detector using the dlib library. You had a few questions regarding what training set dlib used to generate their provided "shape_predictor_68_face_landmarks.dat" model. Some pointers: The author (Davis King) stated that he used the annotated images from the iBUG 300-W dataset. This ...


3

You can do it in OpenCV. The code below will basically do the same operations you did in Photoshop. You may need to tune some of the parameters to get exactly what you want. #include "opencv2\opencv.hpp" using namespace cv; int main(int, char**) { Mat3b img = imread("path_to_image"); // Use HSV color to threshold the image Mat3b hsv; ...


3

It largely depends on your kind of images. If your logo occupies say 90% of the image, you don't need detection, since you are probably good with color histograms. If the logo is small compared to the image, you should "find" the logo, in order to focus your comparison on that and not on the background clutter. There could be multiple logos on the same ...


3

I have worked on the problem of image classification using Bag of features (BoF)and SVM. I did it using C++ and OpenCV but I am sure that you can get similar methods for python too. Concept: Create BoF Dictionary: Take one image from your training samples. Extract SIFT keypoints Extract SIFT descriptors Use k-means clustering to cluster the descriptors ...


3

You are pretty close, but there are a few errors. The code below should work as expected. I also added a small piece of code to show the classification result, where pixels of the larger cluster are red, the other with shades of green. You never initialized int clusters[5];, so it will contains random numbers at the beginning, compromising it as an ...


3

In my opinion using alpha is not the correct way. You should accumulate the (absolute) differences from the exposure frame: if (_frameCount == 0) { _exposed = image.clone(); } else { _exposed += image - _exposed; }


3

The problem does not lie in numpy but in matplotlib way of displaying data. In order to produce valid visualization you should flip y-axis on the image generation level, not numpy analysis. It can be easily done through matplitlib API to the axes object: plt.gca().invert_yaxis()


3

Yes. Mostly if you're using a non-symmetric kernel. Most of the time people use a kernel that's either a square, a circle, or a Gaussian. In these cases you probably want the anchor to be in the centre. But there are other uses to filter2D - trying to find the location of certain artefacts. In those cases - the artefact can be located to the, e.g., left of ...


3

This is an improvement i acheived after spending not-much-time with the sample code. What I did - tweak some of the parameters in detectMultiScale - adjust the filter to eliminate largely-overlapping rectangles I would say I get 9/11 hits, with one false positive and two false negatives. Which is all very well, but this is a single static image. ...


3

Since you're using OpenCV 3.0 and C++, you can (and should) use Mat: bool equal (Iplimage *source1, IplImage *source2) { cv::Mat mat1 = cv::cvarrToMat(source1); cv::Mat mat2 = cv::cvarrToMat(source2); cv::Mat D; absdiff(mat1, mat2, D); cv::Scalar s = sum(D); return s == cv::Scalar::all(0); } Update: I had to use the cv::cvarrToMat ...


3

the answer provided by "Klas Lindb├Ąck" is absolutely correct. Just to provide more clarity to someone who might have a similar confusion, I am writing this answer. I created an image with odd rows consisting of red color and even rows consisting of blue color. Then, I used the code given in my original post. As, expected by the answer of "Klas Lindb├Ąck", ...


3

What you want is to sort the array of rects by y position (y - height/2) and then x (x - width/2) if they are on the same vertical line. NSArray *sortedRects; sortedRects = [unsortedRects sortedArrayUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id a, id b) { CGRect *first = (CGRect*)a; CGRect *second = (CGRect*)b; CGFloat yDifference = first.y - (first.height ...


3

You forgot to initialise result for each iteration of n: for (int n = 0; n < this->N; ++n) { result = 0.0f; // initialise `result` to 0 here <<< // Summation in formula for (int t = 0; t < this->N; ++t) { result += (this->centroidDistance[t] * std::exp((-j*PI2 *((float)n)*((float)t)) / ((float)N))); } ...


2

Presumably since you did not ask a question, the example you give does not work. You must compare the content, and not the pointers. You can do it like this #include <string.h> bool equal (Iplimage *source1, IplImage *source2) { if (memcmp(source1, source2, sizeof(Iplimage)) == 0) return true; return false; }


2

To extend Otsu's thresholding method to multi-level thresholding the between class variance equation becomes: Please check out Deng-Yuan Huang, Ta-Wei Lin, Wu-Chih Hu, Automatic Multilevel Thresholding Based on Two-Stage Otsu's Method with Cluster Determination by Valley Estimation, Int. Journal of Innovative Computing, 2011, 7:5631-5644 for more ...


2

OpenCV's findContours method can give you the internal contours if asked politely. It's one of the mode options of cv2.findContours() : CV_RETR_CCOMP retrieves all of the contours and organizes them into a two-level hierarchy. At the top level, there are external boundaries of the components. At the second level, there are boundaries of the holes. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible