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For images, I would suggest to use lightweight easyexif to extract the exposure time. Example: EXIFInfo result; result.parseFrom(JPEGFileBuffer, BufferSize); ... printf("Exposure time: 1/%d s\n", (unsigned) (1.0/result.ExposureTime));


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There are several reasons why the runtime might not be able to resolve the JNI function. Test these hypotheses: The native code library didn't get bundled into your APK. Look inside the APK for it. The native code library is in the wrong directory of the APK. Again, look and see. The Java class got mangled by ProGuard so the names no longer match with the ...


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I ran into the same issue, but for me PYTHONPATH looked something like: PYTHONPATH=/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages:/opt/opencv2.4.9/lib/python2.7/dist-packages Removing /opt/opencv2.4.9/lib/python2.7/dist-packages from the path provided the fix.


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OpenCV has glob function void cv::glob ( String pattern, std::vector< String > & result, bool recursive = false ) here you can find a detailed answer about this function


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I finally actually read the header of /opt/local/share/OpenCV/OpenCVConfig.cmake installed via MacPorts. To use in external projects, it instructs to include: find_package(OpenCV REQUIRED) include_directories(${OpenCV_INCLUDE_DIRS}) target_link_libraries(MY_TARGET_NAME ${OpenCV_LIBS}) (simply adding include_directories to my CMakeLists.txt fixed this for ...


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I finally read the header of the OpenCVConfig.cmake file. It instructs to include these lines to use from an external project: find_package(OpenCV REQUIRED) include_directories(${OpenCV_INCLUDE_DIRS}) target_link_libraries(MY_TARGET_NAME ${OpenCV_LIBS}) (adding include_directories to CMakeLists.txt fixed it for me)


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Focal Length The focal length that you get from camera calibration is in pixels. It is actually the ratio of the "real" focal length (e.g. in mm) and the pixel size (also in mm). The world units cancel out, and you are left with pixels. Unfortunately, you cannot estimate both the focal length in world units and the pixel size, only their ratio. Principal ...


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Reprojection errors are a very good indicator of accuracy. But if you want a more independent verification, try measuring a planar object of a known size and see how close you get. Alternatively, you can measure any kind of object of a known size with a stereo camera.


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you are setting color (0,255,0) to the mask, but the mask is single channel so you draw the contour in color 0. try cv.drawContours(mask, contours, -1, (255),1) or cv.drawContours(mask, contours, -1, (255,255,255),1)


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You should use thickness=CV_FILLED instead of 1 if you want to draw the contour interiors: cv.drawContours(mask, contours, -1, (0,255,0), CV_FILLED )


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I think this might be easy fix. Add: using namespace cv; Above or below: using namespace std;


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You need to set up more than just your linker dependencies and it is very likely you have missed a step. I would suggest following this tutorial as it will get you setup completely.


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The new function is cv2.SimpleBlobDetector_create(params) if i'm not wrong.


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As integrating ndk along with opencv in android studio is a time consuming process, so all I can do is to provide the resources which I referred recently to create an opencv project in Android Studio using ndk. Android NDK and OpenCV Development With Android Studio Building NDK apps with Android studio


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I've finally opened an issue on the opencv github repository: https://github.com/Itseez/opencv/issues/5256.


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Just sort the result by std::sort #include <opencv2/core.hpp> #include <opencv2/highgui.hpp> #include <opencv2/imgproc.hpp> #include <algorithm> #include <iostream> #include <sstream> using namespace cv; using namespace std; void DetectUsingContours(Mat &image) { resize(image,image,Size(810,52)); Mat gray; ...


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I solved my problem when I've configured native library in eclipse. You need choose a library reference your OS platform. Look at here: adding openCV to java buildpath in eclipse.


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The AR.Drone uses a non-standard video format that many libraries and applications cannot handle. For best results, you will need to decode the video as sent by the drone, which is H264 video combined with the drone's custom PaVE headers. For more information, see other posts, such as Ardrone Video Stream decoding in Android


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I guess the error is in line hsv=cv2.cvtColor(frame, cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY), as per the variable naming I am assuming that you want a HSV image but you have mistakenly used cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY in place of cv2.COLOR_BGR2HSV. As cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY converts the image to grayscale and returns a single channel image so applying mask=cv2.inRange(hsv, lower_red, ...


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It depends from algorithm and initialization, from what i know with typical Feed Forward NN and BackPropagation with gradient descend algorithm: Typical training algo for such NN's initializes weights of NN randomly (starting point), NN itself has many local optimas, thus you can find many different suboptimal solutions, and if you start from different ...


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According to http://docs.opencv.org/modules/imgproc/doc/miscellaneous_transformations.html#cvtcolor For the 8-bit images, H is converted to H/2 to fit to the [0,255] range. So the range of hue in the HSV color space of OpenCV is [0,179]


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Do have a look on the Nodejs.org C++ addon and Nan tutorials. Though both are a little misleading, they anyhow describe the canonical way. Use Nan over direct V8 APIs since especially this part (was and still) is changing a lot. With Nan what you're looking for is passing wrapped objects. More precisely this line is the heart of it. In this fork of ...


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I know my answer is maybe a bit late, but anyway: In general 3d-edge-based tracking is a good choice here. You are using the hybrid version which is good if your AR world wont change (means your car stays on a static position and wont be moved). The reason for your laggs is that you still have 7000 polygons. That's to much for mobile. Reduce it to 3000 or ...


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In addition to row-then-column iteration, there are two techniques you can apply to maximize your array processing: Pipelining - which helps maximize core utilization for sequential tasks Parallel For loops - which provide data-parallelism After that, there are other more complex designs like structured grids. There is an NI white paper that describes ...


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So come to find out the problem was that GOMP_4.0 is only available for gcc 4.8 and higher. The VM that Travis runs on is Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Server Edition 64 bit which has gcc 4.6. gcc 4.6 has GOMP_3.0. Basically you need to update gcc. In travis the best way to do this (without using sudo) is to use their apt plugin. Just add this to your .travis.yml ...


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First, you need to make sure your image is in an allowed data format for opencv Then you should use the threshold function or inRange function to create the binary image/matrix according to your needs. With the threshold function, you'd need to apply it twice, since you have a range, but that's not too complicated. There's a really nice blog post on this ...


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Have a look at inRange function. You can do something like: binary = cv2.inRange(gray_image, d, u) You then probably need to invert the binary image: binary_inv = cv2.bitwise_not(binary)


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You can find the answer on many tutorials (e.g. here) and on OpenCV documentation for cvtColor. rgbimg = cv2.cvtColor(hsvimg, cv2.COLOR_HSV2RGB) Note that OpenCV stores RGB values inverting R and B channels, i.e. BGR. So you probably need this instead: bgrimg = cv2.cvtColor(hsvimg, cv2.COLOR_HSV2BGR)


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I've been looking around since I posted the question and tried a lot of things. But finally I found the solution: I changed: mJavaDetectorMouth.detectMultiScale(faceROI, mouths,1.1,1,1, new org.opencv.core.Size(30, 30), new org.opencv.core.Size()); To: mJavaDetectorMouth.detectMultiScale(faceROI, mouths,1.1, 2, ...


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I tested your code with just two filled ellipses, one red and one blue with sizes (1,2) and (2,1) with 0.8 weight for the red and 0.2 for the blue one. Therefore, I should (or I want to) end with the red ellipse @ 0.8 and the blue one @ 0.2. And where they overlap it should be a mix between red and blue, right? Plus if I understood correctly your code, the ...


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I had the same issue on ubuntu 14.o and I struggled alot and fount solution. 1. use below line to print your Native lib path: System.out.println(System.getProperty("java.library.path")); 2. if you are adding external openc4-version.jar then, in eclipse open BuildConfigurationPath->Library->opencv249.jar->Native Library and click edit and choose external ...


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This is not the answer! This is the error when I used above code given for converting a BUfferedImage to Mat image. Code I used fromabove byte[] data = ((DataBufferByte) img.getRaster().getDataBuffer()).getData(); Mat image = new Mat(img.getHeight(), img.getWidth(), CvType.CV_8UC3); image.put(0, 0, data); I got the following error for some image and for ...


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Turns out, there is a bit of a compatibility issue with OpenCV 3.0.0 and Visual Studio 2015. I have tried it with Visual Studio 2013 and everything works perfectly. thank you to those who helped, and thank you to @Simon Kraemer for suggesting this.


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The confunsion to most people is, the opencv reshape() function is different to Matlab's reshape, in matlab you manually provide both new numOfRows and numOfCols. With openCV you just provide the new image dimension(number of channels) as the first parameter and then the number of rows as the second parameter. Open CV automatically figures out the number ...


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I benchmarked this. I have 100000x5 2D array. By iterating rows first it takes some 9ms from my i7 processor to complete. Iterating by columns first takes some 35ms to complete.


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See @MSalters comment for the correct answer. You need some logic or criteria that determines what pixels are considered holes and which aren't. This is used to produce the Binary image(where '0' is the value of non hole pixels and '255' (1 in Matlab world) is the value of hole pixels) which can be used to fill every hole. Then simply add the threshold ...


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LabVIEW is row-major. If you take a 2D array and wire it to the border of a For Loop for auto indexing, the 1D arrays that you get out are the rows. Wire that into a nested For Loop to process the individual elements.


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Assuming the lines are drawn from the center of mass to the perimeter of the mass, instead of using test angles just use the contour points themselves and perform a distance calculation on each set of points. See below for example. (The example code is in C++ and the question tag is java, I will get burned one day for this.) Mat GrayImage; // input ...


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You need to ensure that your frame rate is fast enough to get a decent still of the moving car. When filming, each frame will most likely be blurry, and our brain pieces together the number plate on playback. Of course a blurry frame is no good for letter recognition, so is something you'll need to deal with on the hardware side, rather than software side. ...


-1

Create and edit annotations? That sounds as going much farther than process TIFF Supposing the original post was understood correctly in both the motivation - to create GUI capable of working with large TIFF image-files which also allows users to create and ( later ) edit annotations and other graphical elements ( rectangles et al ) the solution IMHO goes ...


1

This should work: import numpy as np import cv2 import Tkinter as tk import Image, ImageTk #Set up GUI window = tk.Tk() #Makes main window window.wm_title("Digital Microscope") window.config(background="#FFFFFF") #Graphics window imageFrame = tk.Frame(window, width=600, height=500) imageFrame.grid(row=0, column=0, padx=10, pady=2) #Capture video frames ...


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For maven test goal you can use maven-surefire-plugin with parameter Djava.library.path or maven-dependency-plugin with unpacking your libs. I faced a similar problem. <plugin> <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId> <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId> <version>2.18.1</version> ...


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You should use the Vec3f type from OpenCV (which is actually a 3x1 matrix): // I assume you have RGB values as unsigned char in [0-255] interval // here using a dummy color unsigned char R = 255; unsigned char G = 127; unsigned char B = 64; // construct a Vec3f from those, divide by 255 to get them in [0-1] interval Vec3f colorRGB(R/255.0f, G/255.0f, ...


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Not sure if I am right, but YIQ has 3 values the same as RGB, so pictures remain 3 channel. If you multiplicate float with float or integer, you get float, so I don't see the problem with multiplication. Maybe I cannot understand your problem correctly. Multiplication of above should be: Y = 0.299*R+0.587*G+0.114*B, I = 0.596*R-0.274*G-0.322*B, and so on ...


0

If you base64-encode your image, you'll have to decode it later (on the client). That takes time and wastes resources (what if you had to encode/decode billions of images?) An image is binary already, so the fastest way would probably be to simply read (or generate) an image and send it as it is. All in all, you'd better do not do thousands CPU cycles ...


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Are you ok with a 100x speedup? You should save and load your images in binary format. You can do that with the matwrite and matread function in the code below. I tested both loading from a FileStorage and the binary file, and for a smaller image with 250K rows, 192 columns, type CV_8UC1 I got these results (time in ms): // Mat: 250K rows, 192 cols, ...


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It turns out that color matching functions are a capture device and display device problem. Look at this relevant section of the sRGB wiki page Due to the standardization of sRGB on the Internet, on computers, and on printers, many low- to medium-end consumer digital cameras and scanners use sRGB as the default (or only available) working color space. ...


1

How to improve resolution? Generate the output stream with a reasonable pixel-size frameSize and do not devastate the information quality ( you have stated above to have in the inputs ( in static pixmaps ) ) with a "cummulative product" of low FPS frames-per-second rate and too-lossy CODEC ( CV_FOURCC ). SYNTAX: >>> print cv2.VideoWriter.__doc__ ...


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Each member of the matches list must be checked whether two neighbours really exist. This is independent of image sizes. good = [] for m_n in matches: if len(m_n) != 2: continue (m,n) = m_n if m.distance < 0.6*n.distance: good.append(m)


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According to the documentation, cv2.VideoWriter has fourcc parameter which specifies the codec, used to compress the frames. You are now specifying '-1' which means some default codec. I would suggest experimenting with different codecs from that list and see what gives the best result. Update: To translate the codec into an int, the docs recommend this: ...



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