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0

Maybe this could help? https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/fast-panorama-stitching Specifically the part about pairwise matching Ronen


0

Here is the MATLAB version: img = rgb2gray(imread('peppers.png')); kernel = -ones(3)/9; kernel(2,2) = 8/9; out = imfilter(single(img), kernel1); imshow(out, []) % <-- note automatic image rescaling Here is the python version: import numpy as np import cv2 img = cv2.imread("peppers.png", 0) kernel = np.ones((3,3), np.float32) / -9.0 kernel[1][1] ...


0

Getting this together was definitely at the limits of what I am capable of, but I did get it working. First thing is that I used Kyle McDonald's ofxCv addon With this, I used the (much simpler) contour tracking to get the shapes, created shader fbos for each shape, and assigned videos to those as an alpha mask. I apologize if this isn't in detail, it has ...


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You could try to build a histogram with number of bins equal to number of possible pixel values.


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To be honest, You could use any feature desriptor. Modern detectors are designed to find features that can be easily found after changing scale or rotating the feature between images. Harris corners (or Shi-Thomasi if You plan to use good features to track function) are somewhat less sophisticated and look for more obvious ones. Also, corners tell You only ...


1

It should be located under OpenCV-Dir\build\x64 or x86\vc1x\bin\.


0

Too late to answer, but I hope this helps someone else. Separating foreground from background in videos (without any constraint on the background) in a pixel perfect manner is a very difficult problem. A lot of research work has gone into this field and there is still scope. So a simple mixture of gaussians (as is been used by the BackgroundSubtractorMOG2) ...


1

The output of the encoder is AVC-encoded frames. It's not RGB or YUV, it's AVC. The color format specifies the format of the frames you're feeding into the encoder, not what comes out, so it has no effect on what you get from dequeueOutputBuffer(). If you need to manipulate the raw frames, you should do so before passing them into the encoder.


0

Use morphological opening. Shape of the structuring element matters here. Use a rectangular element having width greater than the width of the vertical line, and a height of 1. In the given image, the width of the vertical line is 4, therefore using the following: getStructuringElement(MORPH_RECT, Size(5, 1)) I get


3

No, there is not! You can code your own, though: std::vector<float> unique(const cv::Mat& input, bool sort = false) Find the unique elements of a single channel cv::Mat. Parameters: input: It will be treated as if it was 1-D. sort: Sorts the unique values (optional). The implementation of such function is pretty straight ...


0

You should try the development version 3.0-dev of opencv. The current 2.4 series will not support python3. check this answer. When using pillow, Image.getpixel will give you the pixel value. So, you could simply interpolate two points in pure python and give all these indexes to Image.getpixel. I do not know an elegant pure python implementation of ...


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You can try to use some similarity metrics, like PSNR or SSIM. Another link.


0

Hmm, I actually think I'm onto something (this is like the most interesting question ever - so it'd be a shame not to continue trying to find the "perfect" answer, even though an acceptable one has been found)... Once you find the logo, your troubles are half done. Then you only have to figure out the differences between what's around the logo. ...


1

First, use the erosion function (erode()) until the vertical line disappears. Then, just use dilation (dilate()) - the diagonal lines will get thicker again, and your unwanted vertical line is not going to reappear. It will also work in cases when the unwanted line is not vertical - it is enough for the unwanted line to be thinner than the lines you want to ...


1

import numpy as np import cv from PIL import Image # open the image img = Image.open('./pic.png', 'r') r,g,b, alpha_channel = img.split() mask = np.array(alpha_channel) # all elements in alpha_channel that have value 0 # are set to 1 in the mask matrix mask[alpha_channel==0] = 1 # all elements in alpha_channel that have value 100 # are set to 0 in the ...


0

Context switch describes the time spent to execute other threads. So, when your function is called from onCameraFrame(), it shares CPU with other threads, not necessarily threads that belong to your app. See also answers http://stackoverflow.com/a/10969757/192373, http://stackoverflow.com/a/17902682/192373


3

If you compare im.data and im2.data you will find that they are pointing to the same buffer. Change your code to this Mat im,im2; cam1>>im; im = im.clone(); cam1>>im2; When you read a frame from VideoCapture, it does not copy the data. If you want to copy the data before it gets overwritten by the next frame you have to do it yourself. If ...


1

So you binarized the image by a threshold, resulting in back- and foreground pixels (like canny)? You could apply a contour on the foreground pixels. Each contour is stored as a vector of points, therefore you can apply/move a contour on the next frame. For finding contours in an Image use findContours.


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Yes there is a way. You will just have to convert the Contour into an array of PointF like this: for (var contour = binaryImage.FindContours(CHAIN_APPROX_METHOD.CV_CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE, RETR_TYPE.CV_RETR_CCOMP, mem); contour != null; contour = contour.HNext) { //assuming you have a way of getting the index of //point you ...


0

It is due to how SURF descriptors work, see http://docs.opencv.org/trunk/doc/py_tutorials/py_feature2d/py_surf_intro/py_surf_intro.html Basically with Droid the image is mostly flat color and it's difficult to find keypoints that are not ambiguous. With Nike, the shape is the same, but the intensity ratio is completely different in the descriptors: imagine ...


0

You can build a look up table. So that you know corresponding class for each color. It doesn't have to be 256x256x256 you can reduce number of bins.


1

If your HOG features all use 8x8 cells, then how can you get the same size vector for different size image? Wouldn't you have more cells in a larger image? Generally, if you want to use HOG, you should resize all images to be the same size. Another question: do you just want to classify the images that are already cropped, or do you want to detect objects ...


0

In C++ function declarations are required because language features like overloading rely on it.


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To find the Area follow these steps: Apply thresholding & Binarize the input image. Find Contours. Find the Area of Contours by using cv.ContourArea(); refer this example for further reference.


0

The theory is at least the function signature declaration should be available when it is called as the compiler wants to know the signature of the function. That is why we include header files to cpp/c files. other than the include the compiler cannot identify the function signature and cannot detect any compiler error in cpp/c files in the compilation.


5

The rules are (loosely): A declaration of a function must have come previously for you to call it. A definition of that function must exist somewhere within your project. The example you gave fulfils those rules. So does this: function definition function calling Because a definition is a declaration. We like to split our code up among different ...


2

Here, response is indeed an indicator of "how good" (roughly speaking, in terms of corner-ness) a point is. The higher, the better. The strongest keypoints means the ones that are the best. You can check out this thread for more info and examples.


0

If you ever have an issue loading a particular cascade, I would head to the OpenCV GitHub and grab the one you want from the repo. You can then place the .xml file anywhere you want and then specify a relative or absolute path (your choice). OpenCV Cascade .xml Files


1

Unfortunately, I had some problems with user2645214's solution (still getting java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError), but I found another one, so I decided to share it with those who would have the same problem. Since release 0.7.3 there is another way to include your *.so files - you can just put them in /src/main/jniLibs (just create jniLibs directory if you ...


0

Coming back to the k-means idea: I tried to implement the Matlab-example from above into opencv. I found some code to do so but unfortunately end up with a black output image (instead of clustered-grey's like in the Matlab example...). I guess the question is: How do I convert the bestLabels to a RGB-image? (or gray-image)? Or is there anything wrong ...


1

your haar classifier code is working well.in your code change this rectangle(frame, Point(r1.y,r1.x), Point(r1.y+r1.height,r1.x+r1.width), Scalar(0,255,0),2, 8); rectangle(frame, Point(r2.y,r2.x), Point(r2.y+r2.height,r2.x+r2.width), Scalar(255,0,0),2, 8); to rectangle(frame, Point(r1.x, r1.y), Point(r1.x + r1.width, r1.y + r1.height), ...


2

You could try using SLIC Superpixels. I tried it and showed some good results. You could vary the parameters to get better clustering. SLIC Superpixels SLIC Superpixels with OpenCV C++ SLIC Superpixels with OpenCV Python


0

Did you build your OpenCv properly after downloading it's source from git. Check out this link :- http://docs.opencv.org/doc/tutorials/introduction/linux_install/linux_install.html Underfined reference error means that the linker is unable to find the code for the functions you are using in your project, as a result you need to first install opencv ...


0

The ColorImageFrameReady event is triggered 30 seconds a second (30fps) if everything goes smoothly. I think it's rather heavy to save every picture at once. I suggest you use a Backgroundworker, you can check if the worker is busy and if not just pass the bytes to the backgroundworker and do your magic. You can easily save or make an image from a byte[]. ...


2

I think you can use a simple clustering such as k-means for this, then examine the cluster centers (or the mean and standard deviations of each cluster). I quickly tried it in matlab. im = imread('tvBqt.jpg'); gr = rgb2gray(im); x = double(gr(:)); idx = kmeans(x, 4); cl = reshape(idx, 600, 472); figure, subplot(1, 2, 1), imshow(gr, []), title('original') ...


0

For me the "haarcascade_frontalface_alt.xml" is in the following directory: C:\opencv2.4.9\sources\data\haarcascades I am loading it with the following command: CascadeClassifier cascade1; cascade1.load("C:/opencv2.4.9/sources/data/haarcascades/haarcascade_frontalface_alt.xml"); It seems to be working for me here when I give the exact path to the location ...


0

Either add the edge image to the original image (the edge image pixels should be 0 or 255 so the edges will appear as white) Or presumably you are doping something with the edge data to find cells, so use the opencv drawLine/drawCircle function to draw over the image at your calculated cell positions - this also shows that your algorithm is correct.


4

Your code will be much faster than this, but this is how to do it with split() and max(): Mat CalcRGBmax(Mat i_RGB) { std::vector<cv::Mat> planes(3); cv::split(i_RGB, planes); return cv::Mat(cv::max(planes[2], cv::max(planes[1], planes[0]))); }


0

Your question is a simple one, and the answer is a simple one, as well: No, you are not doing anything wrong. The implementation of the line drawing in OpenCV seems to be quite basic. I tried this with several line widths and also with fractional starting and ending positions. The line width parameter does not really work. The simple Brezenham lines ...


0

I've experienced lots of error building opencv that were caused by the wrong version of OpenCV. I successfully built opencv 3.0 using cmake 3.0 (though cmake 2.6 did not work for me). Then when I found I had to downgrade to opencv 2.4.9 I had to go back to my system's default cmake 2.6, as cmake 3.0 did not work. The first thing to check if you get errors ...


0

If I'm not wrong the homography is right: two of the corners and the alignment of the lines is completely correct. The problem appears when there are corners of the poster that are behind the camera.... As they are behind, the projection of the point doesn't have sense: you can not project a 3d point that is in the negative part of the opitcal axis, hence ...


2

If you want a simple squared difference measure ("which is the euclidian nearest number), this will work. Calculate differences diff = ((src[:,:,:,None] - colors.T)**2).sum(axis=2) (assuming src is y,x,3 in shape) Pick closest colour index: index = diff.argmin(axis=2) New image: out = colors[index] If your colours are really to have component ...


1

Your approach isn't really the way to do it. It is not efficient and very hard to automate - if you compare pixels by value, you will end up trying to find a proper pixel value range for each picture separately (because depending on the picutre, a similar pixel value will mean something different), which is troublesome and extremely time-consuming. Your ...


0

Here is what I suggest: CvCapture* capture = cvCaptureFromFile("input_video_path"); int loop = 0; IplImage* frame = NULL; Mat matframe; char fname[20]; do { frame = cvQueryFrame(capture); ...


0

You have to use Pinvoke technology which let you call c++ functions from c# code . if you have such a function written in c++ extern "C" { MYAPI void print_line(const char* str); } you can define a prototype for it in c# [DllImport("NativeLib.dll")] private static extern void print_line(string str); and then you can use it in c# as a normal function ...


1

Okay, I found the answer. It was an error with the dlls. I was running the program in debug mode and the openCV dlls linked were for the release mode.


0

To project into real world coordinates system, you need the Projection camera matrix. This can be done as: cv::Mat KR = CalibMatrix * R; cv::Mat eyeC = cv::Mat::eye(3,4,CV_64F); eyeC.at<double>(0,3) = -T.at<double>(0); eyeC.at<double>(1,3) = -T.at<double>(1); eyeC.at<double>(2,3) = -T.at<double>(2); CameraMatrix = ...


0

I finally found a way to fix this, but it's not a pretty one. I copied the libstdc++.so.6.0.19 from my /usr/lib and copied it into /opt/lampp/lib and relinked the libstdc++.so.6 to the new file. It was linked to libstdc++.so.6.0.8 previously. I didn't find any other "legit" way of doing this.


0

Be sure you follow these steps for grabbing a frame with Kinect/OpenNI (1.5.4.0+): cv::Mat rgb_image, depth_map; cv::VideoCapture device.open(CV_CAP_OPENNI); //set RGB-Depth mapping device.set(CV_CAP_OPENNI_DEPTH_GENERATOR_REGISTRATION, 1.0); while(1) { device.grab(); device.retrieve(rgb_image, CV_CAP_OPENNI_BGR_IMAGE); device.retrieve(depth_map, ...



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