Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

A texture bind and glDrawArrays() per character? Not the best way to do it. Minimize the number of texture binds & draw calls: Glom all your glyphs into (ideally) a single texture atlas Throw all the vertex info for a frame's worth of text into a single VBO Draw all your strings for the frame with a single glDrawArrays() call


3

I wouldn't bother with GL_LUMINANCE, it's an obsolete feature from old versions of OpenGL (no, seriously, don't use it). In a modern setting, you would use: Internal format GL_R16. All this means is "one channel, 16 bits, normalized". Format GL_RED. (Formats are not sized, so GL_LUMINANCE16 is illegal here, and GL_R16 is also illegal.) Type ...


2

The code fragment you posted one would naively assume that the only memory involved is that of the arrays/vectors within p_cloud. However modern OpenGL implementations operate asynchronously. OTOH you get the guarantee that after glDraw… returns the memory pointed to is safe to deallocate. Which means that the OpenGL implementation has to create a shadow ...


2

Don't use glutGet() before you've called glutInit() Initialize your variables Use C++-style #includes Set your matrices in your display callback, helps prevent usage errors No need to use Windows to track/hide the cursor, (Free)GLUT has functions for that Wrap your lines to something reasonable A timerfunc or vsync is much friendlier on the battery/CPU fan ...


2

When you use linear filtering (value GL_LINEAR for the GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER and/or GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER texture parameters), the value of your samples will generally be determined by the two slices closest to your 3rd texture coordinate. If the size of your 3D texture in the 3rd dimension is d, the position of the first slice in texture coordinate space ...


2

glGenBuffers(int n, ByteBuffer buffer) generates n vertex buffer objects (VBOs), which you can use to store your data, and puts them in the specified buffer. This buffer is not actually the one that holds your data, but the ids of the VBOs just generated. You have to manually define the VBO data with glBufferData. The function is useful if you want to ...


2

The (second) format parameter is only for telling what is contained in the data, not how it's laid out. Therefore GL_LUMINANCE16 is an invalid token to pass to the format parameter (it's allowed only for the internalformat parameter). The layout from which the data shall be unpacked is controlled by the type parameter to glTexImage and the pixel store ...


3

It's unclear what sort of "conversion" you have in mind: 0x1406 equals 5126. They're just different ways of writing the same number in source code, and the compiler translates them both into the binary form that's used at runtime. You should be able to just use the == operator to compare the result of glGetProgramResource against a constant like GL_FLOAT, ...


2

Is it EVER the case that a triplet is non uniform such as 1/2/1 ? Yep. Negative values are also possible: Referencing vertex data For all elements, reference numbers are used to identify geometric vertices, texture vertices, vertex normals, and parameter space vertices. Each of these types of vertices is numbered separately, starting ...


2

Yes, the indexes can be different. This is a line from the Wikipedia article: f 6/4/1 3/5/3 7/6/5 Yes, OpenGL only supports one index array. This means that you can't just pipe the data through OpenGL without significant pre-processing first. I believe that the format dates back to the 1980s, which predates OpenGL and certainly means that the files ...


2

Hmm, how about that error message: Error compiling vertex shader: ERROR: 0:1: '' : version '130' is not supported That's exactly what your problem is. GLSL version 1.30 relates to OpenGL-3.0; since there were not core/compatibility profiles in that version, yet, MacOS X doesn't support it. When it comes to modern OpenGL MacOS X only supports core ...


2

I finally managed to bind texture array as a color buffer. It is hard to find useful information on the topic, so here is an instruction: №1. You need to create a texture array and initialize it properly: glGenTextures(1, &arrayBuffer); glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY, arrayBuffer); // we should initialize layers for each mipmap level for (int ...


1

You are not creating the context version you think you are creating: SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_CONTEXT_PROFILE_MASK, SDL_GL_CONTEXT_PROFILE_CORE | SDL_GL_CONTEXT_FORWARD_COMPATIBLE_FLAG) is just invalid, the SDL_GL_CONTEXT_FORWARD_COMPATIBLE_FLAG does not belong into the SDL_GL_CONTEXT_PROFILE_MASK flags, but into the SDL_GL_CONTEXT_FLAGS. Actually, ...


1

1. create your own sphere mesh simple 2D loop through 2 angles (spherical coordinate system 2 cartesian) you can easily add ellipsoid properties (earth is not a sphere) if you want more precision if not then you can use single sphere mesh for all planets and just scale it before use ... let a be the longitude and b the latitude so loop a from 0 to 2*PI ...


1

Because you haven't defined setPixel anywhere. It's not an OpenGL call. You need to write it yourself, and it should set pixels on a buffer (if you're using double buffering) which you then later use as an argument to glDrawPixels(), or a call to the display buffer using glVertex2i(x,y). You can see an example of both approaches here and here. Also, your ...


1

Because there is no setPixel method in OpenGL or GLUT and as far as I can see from your code, you do not define one either. OpenGL deals with rendering primitives like points, lines, triangels etc, but not directly with setting single pixels on the screen. Since it is unclear what you want to achieve some suggestions: If you want to draw a line in OpenGL, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible