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After creating a GLFW window the OpenGL context created by this will be made current in the thread that did create the window. Before you can make an OpenGL context current in another thread is must be release (made un-current) in the thread currently holding it. So the thread holding the context must call glfwMakeContextCurrent(NULL) before the new thread ...


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According to the Qt documentation, you can use QOpenGLShaderProgram::log(): Returns the errors and warnings that occurred during the last link() or addShader() with explicitly specified source code. You can then parse the resulting string to build your own error message.


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Trying to use the fixed pipeline (no shaders), is no longer recommended, but is still possible (the GPU's emulate it). You can still use opengl 1 syntax (glTranslatef etc) Before glDrawArrays. You will need to setup the appropriate matrices as always. Normally they are done by the user specifying their own model/view/projection matrices, and sending them to ...


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The top example won't work as the second glBufferData call will overwrite all of the buffer space in the second one. To properly do that, you have to use the stride and pointer arguments properly, so that the data is interleaved. It's easier (and cleaner imo) to just have multiple VBO's, each storing a separate set of data.


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You can't do multisampled and non-multisampled rendering in a single draw call. As you already found, using two color targets in an FBO, with only one of them being multisampled, is not supported. From the "Framebuffer Completeness" section in the spec: The value of RENDERBUFFER_SAMPLES is the same for all attached renderbuffers; the value of ...


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Looks like the bytes in your 32-bit values are swapped relative to what OpenGL expects for the mask. The byte order is controlled by the GL_UNPACK_LSB_FIRST pixels store parameter, which is GL_FALSE by default. Since the LSB is first on a little endian machine, which is most likely what you're using, this is backwards. You can fix it by changing the value: ...


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This is called a subpixel feature, when geometry gets smaller than a single pixel. If you animated the very thin triangle, you would see the pixels pop in and out. Try turning multi-sampling on. Most GL windowing libraries support multisampled back buffer. You can also force it on in your graphics driver settings.


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As @BrettHale mentions, this is an aliasing problem. For example, Without super/multisampling, the triangle only covers the centre of the bottom right pixel and only it will receive colour. Real pixels have area and in a perfect situation, would receive a portion of the colour equal to the area covered. "Antialiasing" techniques reduce aliasing effects ...



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