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288

If I understand correctly, performance-wise, flipping the sign of Z and the depth test is nothing but changing a < comparison to a > comparison. So, if I understand correctly and the author isn't lying or making things up, then changing < to > used to be a vital optimization for many games. I didn't explain that particularly well, because it ...


135

Some of the terminology is a bit off: A Vertex Array is just an array (typically a float[]) that contains vertex data. It doesn't need to be bound to anything. Not to be confused with a Vertex Array Object or VAO, which I will go over later A Buffer Object, commonly referred to as a Vertex Buffer Object when storing vertices, or VBO for short, is what ...


125

The model, view and projection matrices are three separate matrices. Model maps from an object's local coordinate space into world space, view from world space to camera space, projection from camera to screen. If you compose all three, you can use the one result to map all the way from object space to screen space, making you able to work out what you need ...


118

One way you can do it is to start with a platonic solid with triangular sides - an octahedron, for example. Then, take each triangle and recursively break it up into smaller triangles, like so: Once you have a sufficient amount of points, you normalize their vectors so that they are all a constant distance from the center of the solid. This causes the ...


118

Rendering outlines, unless you render only a dozen characters total, remains a "no go" due to the number of vertices needed per character to approximate curvature. Though there have been approaches to evaluate bezier curves in the pixel shader instead, these suffer from not being easily antialiased, which is trivial using a distance-map-textured quad, and ...


103

All About OpenGL Objects The standard model for OpenGL objects is as follows. Objects have state. Think of them as a struct. So you might have an object defined like this: struct Object { int count; float opacity; char *name; }; The object has certain values stored in it and it has state. OpenGL objects have state too. Changing State In ...


98

The identity matrix, in terms of the projection and modelview matrices, essentially resets the matrix back to its default state. As you hopefully know, glTranslate and glRotate are always relative to the matrix's current state. So for instance, if you call glTranslate, you are translating from the matrix's current 'position', not from the origin. But if you ...


86

Looks like OpenGL is trying to report some error on Win2003, however you've not configured your system where to output logging info. You can add the following to the beginning of your program and you'll see details of the error in stderr. import logging logging.basicConfig() Checkout documentation on logging module to get more config info, conceptually ...


79

One example of "immediate mode" is using glBegin and glEnd with glVertex in between them. Another example of "immediate mode" is to use glDrawArrays with a client vertex array (i.e. not a vertex buffer object). You will usually never want to use immediate mode (except maybe for your first "hello world" program) because it is deprecated functionality and ...


76

Patience, technical skill and endurance. First point is that a DX Demo is primarily a teaching aid so it's done for clarity not speed of execution. It's a pretty big subject to condense but games development is primarily about understanding your data and your execution paths to an almost pathological degree. Your code is designed around two things - ...


68

The Frame Buffer object is not actually a buffer, but an aggregator object that contains one or more attachments, which by their turn, are the actual buffers. You can understand the Frame Buffer as C structure where every member is a pointer to a buffer. Without any attachment, a Frame Buffer object has very low footprint. Now each buffer attached to a ...


60

Furthermore, we have a predefined gl_FragColor. Let's start with this. No, you don't have the predefined gl_FragColor. That was removed from core OpenGL 3.1 and above. Unless you're using compatibility (in which case, your 3.30 shaders should say #version 330 compatibility at the top), you should never use this. Now, back to user-defined fragment ...


60

glewExperimental = GL_TRUE; glewInit(); Should do the magic Experimental Drivers GLEW obtains information on the supported extensions from the graphics driver. Experimental or pre-release drivers, however, might not report every available extension through the standard mechanism, in which case GLEW will report it unsupported. To circumvent ...


59

A fragment shader is the same as pixel shader. One main difference is that a vertex shader can manipulate the attributes of vertices. which are the corner points of your polygons. The fragment shader on the other hand takes care of how the pixels between the vertices look. They are interpolated between the defined vertices following specific rules. For ...


58

There are currently 4 ways to do this: standard 1D textures, buffer textures, uniform buffers, and shader storage buffers. 1D Textures With this method, you use glTex(Sub)Image1D to fill a 1D texture with your data. Since your data is just an array of floats, your image format should be GL_R32F. You then access it in the shader with a simple texelFetch ...


53

Cause: The stdlib.h which ships with the recent versions of Visual Studio has a different (and conflicting) definition of the exit() function. It clashes with the definition in glut.h. Solution: Override the definition in glut.h with that in stdlib.h. Place the stdlib.h line above the glut.h line in your code. #include <stdlib.h> #include ...


51

You can't easily communicate back to the CPU from within GLSL. Using glslDevil or other tools is your best bet. A printf would require trying to get back to the CPU from the GPU running the GLSL code. Instead, you can try pushing ahead to the display. Instead of trying to output text, output something visually distinctive to the screen. For example ...


51

Have a look at this picture: Graphical Projections The glOrtho command produces an "Oblique" projection that you see in the bottom two panels. No matter how far away vertexes are in the z direction, they will not recede into the distance. I use glOrtho every time I need to do 2D graphics in OpenGL (such as health bars, menus etc) using the following code ...


50

The first thing to do is install the OpenGL libraries. I recommend: freeglut3 freeglut3-dev libglew1.5 libglew1.5-dev libglu1-mesa libglu1-mesa-dev libgl1-mesa-glx libgl1-mesa-dev Once you have them installed, link to them when you compile: g++ -lglut -lGL -lGLU -lGLEW example.cpp -o example In example.cpp, include the OpenGL libraries like so: ...


50

Mind that these commands exist since the early days of OpenGL. glFlush ensures that previous OpenGL commands must complete in finite time (OpenGL 2.1 specs, page 245). If you draw directly to the front buffer, this shall ensure that the OpenGL drivers starts drawing without too much delay. You could think of a complex scene that appears object after object ...


50

The most practical approach seems to be to ignore most of OpenGL functionality that is not directly applicable (or is slow, or not hardware accelerated, or is a no longer a good match for the hardware). OOP or not, to render some scene those are various types and entities that you usually have: Geometry (meshes). Most often this is an array of vertices and ...


49

There is some confusion here. OpenGL is right handed in object space and world space. But in window space (aka screen space) we are suddenly left handed. How did this happen? The way we get from right-handed to left-handed is a negative z scaling entry in the glOrtho or glFrustum projection matrices. Scaling z by -1 (while leaving x and y as they ...


48

In general, it's because (1) the games are being optimal about what they need to render, and (2) take special advantage of your hardware. For instance, one easy optimization you can make involves not actually trying to draw things that can't be seen. Consider a complex scene like a cityscape from Grand Theft Auto IV. The renderer isn't actually rendering ...


47

Texture coordinates specify the point in the texture image that will correspond to the vertex you are specifying them for. Think of a square rubber sheet with your texture image printed on it, where the length of each side is normalized to the range 0-1. Now let's say you wanted to draw a triangle using that texture. You'd take 3 pins and place them in the ...


47

In OpenGL you don't create objects, you just draw them. Once they are drawn, OpenGL no longer cares about what geometry you sent it. glutSolidSphere is just sending drawing commands to OpenGL. However there's nothing special in and about it. And since it's tied to GLUT I'd not use it. Instead, if you really need some sphere in your code, how about create if ...


46

What is the difference between FBO and PBO? A better question is how are they similar. The only thing that is similar about them is their names. A Framebuffer Object (note the capitalization: framebuffer is one word, not two) is an object that contains multiple images which can be used as render targets. A Pixel Buffer Object is: A Buffer Object. ...


46

Yes this is possible. You declare uniform arrays similar to how you'd do it in C, e.g. uniform float v[10]; Then you can set their values using glUniform{1,2,3,4}{f,i}v GLfloat v[10] = {...}; glUniform1fv(glGetUniformLocation(program, "v"), 10, v);


46

By default? In counter-clockwise order. Consider a triangle facing the camera: A |\ | \ | \ B---C A->B->C would be front facing (counter-clockwise order), A->C->B would be rear-facing (clockwise order). You can change which way OpenGL considers "front facing" via glFrontFace(): The projection of a polygon to window coordinates is said to have ...



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