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5

This is your problem: float tx = (1 / texture.getWidth()) * textureX; Texture is an integer, and when you divide integers you get an interger. Everything past the ones digit is truncated. This expression evaluates zero. You can fix this by making one a floating point number: float tx = (1f / texture.getWidth()) * textureX; Or a double for more ...


5

mix() is really just a convenience function for something you can easily write yourself. The definition is: mix(v1, v2, a) = v1 * (1 - a) + v2 * a Or putting it differently, it calculates a weighted average of v1 and v2, with two weights w1 and w2 that are float values between 0.0 and 1.0 meeting the constraint w1 + w2 = 1.0: v1 * w1 + v2 * w2 You can ...


5

The glGen… functions go back to OpenGL-1.1 (glGenTextures) and are used to create object names without actually initializing the object. However most of the time those functions are used to create only one object name at a time. So instead of passing them a pointer to a buffer and the size of the buffer you could most of the time just return a single ...


5

Your check for glGetAttribLocation() failing to find the attribute is incorrect: GLuint vertexUVID = glGetAttribLocation(shaderProgram, "color"); if(!vertexUVID) cout << "vertexUVID not found ..." << endl; glGetAttribLocation() returns a GLint (not GLuint), and the result is -1 if an attribute with the given name is not found in the ...


5

This is fine and recommended, most people do this to avoid duplicate data in memory which is of no use. There is no penalty for doing so.


4

The GL3 and GL4 level man pages on www.opengl.org only document the Core Profile of OpenGL. GL_POLYGON is deprecated, and was not part of the Core Profile when the spec was split into Core and Compatibility profiles in OpenGL 3.2. You can still use GL_POLYGON if you create a context that supports the Compatibility Profile. But if you start out, I would ...


4

I see two problems with your code. Both are fixed with a little change. You try to apply a rotation operation, taking X and Y coordinates as input and having the new X and Y as output. For every vertex you rotate, you have two lines of code: the first computes the X, the second the Y coordinate. But when computing the Y coordinate, you use the already ...


4

You can use Primitive Restart (OpenGL 3.1+) to restart a primitive such as a triangle fan while rendering, as if you started another glDraw* command. Use glEnable(GL_PRIMITIVE_RESTART) to enable it, then glPrimitiveRestartIndex(restartIndex) to set an index (such as 0xFFFF) to use to signal a restart. Then whenever OpenGL encounters the restart index, it ...


4

Presumably prm.LoadShader returns a std::string by value. Calling c_str gives you the internal character storage of a std::string, which only lives as long as the std::string does. By the end of each of the LoadShader lines, the std::string that was returned is destroyed because it was a temporary object, and the pointers you've stored are no longer pointing ...


4

It doesn't. You specify to the GL, either through inline location attribute in the shader or through binding with glBindAttribLocation which location will be used with your input shader attributes. Syntax for the location in shader (a layout qualifier): layout(location = attribute index) in vec3 position; Edit to add: I should mention that if you don't ...


4

Wrong command sequencing. You have this: int main( void ) { ... GLuint VertexArrayID; glGenVertexArrays(1, &VertexArrayID); glBindVertexArray(VertexArrayID); ... window = glfwCreateWindow( 1024, 768, "Playground", NULL, NULL); ... glfwMakeContextCurrent(window); ... if (glewInit() != GLEW_OK) { ... } Since ...


4

Below are three distinct approaches to this problem, depending on which OpenGL features are available to you: 1) As pointed out by Andon M. Coleman in the comments, the solution in OpenGL version 4.00 and above is simple; just use the textureQueryLod function: #version 400 uniform sampler2D myTexture; in vec2 textureCoord; // in normalized units out vec4 ...


4

You can't bind textures between glBegin() and glEnd(). Only a limited set of GL calls can be made between glBegin() and glEnd() (see https://www.opengl.org/sdk/docs/man2/xhtml/glBegin.xml for the full list), and glBindTexture() is not one of them. To bind a different texture for each side, you need to start a new begin/end pair for each side: //Top ...


4

Certainly. For example if your attribute is a vec4, and the attribute location is attrLoc, you can use one of the following to set an attribute value that applies to the whole draw call: glVertexAttrib4f(attrLoc, 1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f, 4.0f); glDrawArrays(...); GLfloat attrVal[4] = {1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f, 4.0f}; glVertexAttrib4fv(attrLoc, attrVal); ...


3

The compiler is allowed to optimize away any unused uniforms, which is why you get this error. You can safely ignore this. If the uniform isn't found, glGetUniformLocation returns -1. From the OpenGL 4.3 specs, section 7.6.1: If the value of location is -1, the Uniform* commands will silently ignore the data passed in, and the current uniform values ...


3

Your sequencing is wrong. glewInit() requires a current GL context to do its thing. Without a current context it can't query the GL for entry points and leaves all of its function pointers (such as glTexImage3D()) set to NULL. glfwInit() DOES NOT create a GL context nor make one current. You need glfwCreateWindow() and glfwMakeContextCurrent() for that.


3

Vertex shader outputs are not passed directly to the fragment shader when you have a geometry shader. It is this that is causing all of your problems. For a vertex attribute to be active, it has to contribute to the final output of your program. Basically that means something calculated in the fragment shader has to be based off of it. Unfortunately, that ...


3

I cannot see anything immediately wrong with your shader that would cause this... I can, however, immediately spot a work-around for it that will probably also improve performance in the case when blur is false. I would suggest re-writing the end of your shader this way: FragColor = texture( color_tiu, vUV ); if ( blur ) { const int MAX_SAMPLES = ...


3

Need more space than the one I have in a comment... Assuming that GL.Viewport is actually a wrapper for glViewport, then GL.Viewport(-Width, -Height, Width*2, Height*2) makes little sense as it brings 3/4 of the viewport outside your window surface. Just pass (0, 0, width, height) for painting on your entire window, 0, 0 being in the lower-left corner. ...


3

It may look like the glViewport*() calls specify pixel rectangles. But if you look at the details of the OpenGL rendering pipeline, that's not the case. They specify the parameters for the viewport transformation. This is the transformation that maps normalized device coordinates (NDC) to window coordinates. If x, y, w and h are your specified viewport ...


3

You can slurp the depthbuffer to host memory via glReadPixels() and GL_DEPTH_COMPONENT and re-upload the buffer as a GL_LUMINANCE texture: #include <GL/glew.h> #include <GL/glut.h> #include <vector> using namespace std; void display() { int w = glutGet( GLUT_WINDOW_WIDTH ); int h = glutGet( GLUT_WINDOW_HEIGHT ); glClear( ...


3

I think you have an error in LoadShaders. The C++ 11 version of the loop: for (auto entry : shaders) entry.shader = CreateShader(entry.type, entry.filename); takes a copy of each entry in shaders, so the elements in the vector will not be updated. Try instead: for (auto &entry : shaders) entry.shader = CreateShader(entry.type, ...


3

That's not the OpenGL version! It's the GLX version. AFAIK GLX 1.4 is the latest release. You can use the glxinfo command to check all version numbers. On my machine I get: $glxinfo | grep 'GLX version' GLX version: 1.4 $glxinfo | grep OpenGL OpenGL vendor string: Intel Open Source Technology Center OpenGL renderer string: Mesa DRI Intel(R) Ironlake Mobile ...


3

I've answered a very similar question before, here. The answer is pasted below for reference: Kivy, for which OpenGL 2.0 seems to be mandatory. Strictly, Kivy targets OpenGL ES 2.0 as the minimum requirement. This is not the same as OpenGL 2.0. Well, the question is simple. At home I have three computers of which two are quite ...


3

You must use the glViewport function to tell OpenGL the size of the target window it shall address with its drawing operations. So when you switch to render to FBO, you must call glViewport with something that makes sense for the target texture; usually the target texture itself. When switching to render to the window you call glViewport with the target ...


3

Quality question requires quality response for (int i = 0; i < 50000; i++) { glPushMatrix(); glTranslatef(-500 + rand() % 1000, 7 + rand() % 100, -500 + rand() % 1000); glutSolidTeapot(10); glPopMatrix(); } or might as well without glut GLUquadric* q = gluNewQuadric(); for (int i = 0; i < 50000; i++) { glPushMatrix(); glTranslatef(-500 ...


3

From here: take a look at the OpenGL 4.2 spec chapter 3.9.11 equation 3.21. The mip map level is calculated based on the lengths of the derivative vectors: float mip_map_level(in vec2 texture_coordinate) { vec2 dx_vtc = dFdx(texture_coordinate); vec2 dy_vtc = dFdy(texture_coordinate); float delta_max_sqr = max(dot(dx_vtc, ...


3

std::unique_ptr<Graphics> g; g->createVAO(); Where do you actually populate g with something? Right now it looks like you're dereferencing a NULL pointer. Try this: std::unique_ptr<Graphics> g( new Graphics );


3

You misunderstood what glDrawRangeElements() acutally does. The call glDrawRangeElements(primtype, count, a, b, dtype, offsst; is rendering the same data as glDrawElements(primtype, count, dtype, offset); no matter what a and b are set to. You just get undefined behavior when you lie to the GL about the range you are going to use. What you are doing ...


3

The output of a vertex shader is a four component vector, vec4 gl_Position. From Section 13.6 Coordinate Transformations of core GL 4.4 spec: Clip coordinates for a vertex result from shader execution, which yields a vertex coordinate gl_Position. Perspective division on clip coordinates yields normalized device coordinates, followed by a ...



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