New answers tagged

-1

Here is the problem. glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D,0,GL_RGBA,surface->w,surface->h,0,GL_RGB,GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE,surface->pixels); Your format parameter is incorrect. is should be glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D,0,GL_RGBA,surface->w,surface->h,0,GL_RGBA8,GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE,surface->pixels); GL_RGBA8 will represent 8 bits per channel which is what ...


0

First of all install all the required libraries yum install mesa-libGL yum install mesa-libGL-devel yum install freeglut-devel Next you need to actually compile everything correctly: g++ *.cpp -lGL -lGLU -lglut And try to remove all those headers and replace it with #include <GL/glut.h>


0

Instead of including all those files, try to include only: #include <GL/glut.h>


0

To erase the blocky-effect, I've tried to do a 2x2 PCF manually in the shader. It leads to the following result, which also seems to be correct: The OpenGL specification does not dictate the specific algorithm to be used when linearly interpolating depth comparisons. However, it generally describes it as: The details of this are implementation-...


0

The keypoint here is the usage of glEnableVertexAttribArray and glDisableVertexAttribArray. From OpenGL ES 3.0 programming guide 2nd Ed. The commands glEnableVertexAttribArray and glDisableVertexAttribArray are used to enable and disable a generic vertex attribute array, respectively. If the vertex attribute array is disabled for a generic attribute ...


1

It's best to simplify your problem to track down the issue. For example, instead of loading an actual image, you could just allocate a width*heigth*3 buffer and fill it with 127 to get a grey image (or pink to make it more obvious). Try coloring your fragments with the uv coordinates instead of using the sampler to see whether these values are set correctly. ...


0

As you have provided the jar file of OpenCV but not configured the Native library location. You need to install OpenCV in your machine first and provide the path of jar file in build path using folder created after installation of the OpenCV (or use jar file that you have downloaded.) and also location of Native library location should be "opencv-2.4.7/...


4

Actually the return type of glGetAttribLocation is not GLuint but GLint (which is signed). So 4294967295 it's indeed -1 which means that a problem occurred somewhere. Causes could be many: program is invalid or incorrectly linked attribute is not used attribute name is invalid It's hard to tell the cause since we can't guess your code but the problem ...


4

glm::mat4 is, for all intents and purposes, an array of 16 floats. Not a pointer to 16 floats, an actual float[16] array. 16 floats, one after the other. Therefore, a vector<glm::mat4> manages a contiguous array of elements, where each element is 16 floats. It is that data that you want to store in your buffer object. So... do that. vector manages a ...


0

There are several different ways to actually implement this. But the most commonly used method is, that the windowing system itself is responsible for creating window framebuffers and OpenGL contexts. Applications do not create OpenGL contexts and framebuffers in isolation, if the detination is a window! But how can the windowing system access all the ...


1

Add a timer callback to post a redisplay every now and again: void timer( int value ) { glutPostRedisplay(); glutTimerFunc( 16, timer, 0 ); } Otherwise display() will only be called when the OS feels like it, usually after an expose/damage/paint event (like a window resize, or exposing more of the window by moving another window off of it). All ...


0

The goal would be to display a high resolution video stream (4K, 60FPS) so I need good performance. The only and proper way to do this is using some accelerated presentation API (which have nothing to do with OpenGL). If you want to stick with OpenGL, you'd want at least to have the GPU do the video decoding and uploading into a texture. How to do so ...


0

Turns out I forgot the texture parameters: glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST); glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_NEAREST); No clue why that breaks imageSize() calls though.


-1

MUST USE MDI to create child windows, just remember, USE MDI!!!! Or there will be something really weird, this is bacese those messages are not processed properly, and MDI will help us to do it.


1

You could use linear interpolation between what you could decide as being "keyframes". You would just require the time past since the last keyframe (between 0 and 1) and the associated texture of it (time and texture would hence be additional uniforms). Then the color of your fragment would be something like mix(keyframe_color, actual_color, elapsed_time) (...


0

I believe with your math, all vertices are created in a (0,0,0)-(9.9, 9.9, 9.9) range. Then you compute the centroid and subtract. lets say your mx, my, mz is (5.0, 5.0, 5.0). Now if you subtract the centroid, all your points are now in the range (-5.0, -5.0, -5.0) and (4.9, 4.9, 4.9). In other words all you have done is center all your points to the origin....


2

You are using the wrong version of glUniform*() What you want to use for sending a 1D array of ints is glUniform1iv(). Note how the i is for int, f for float. The number represents the number of elements. Now for arrays suffix v and number represents the dimensions. GL.Uniform1iv(arrayLocation, ints.Length, ints); Here is a link for reference https://www....


0

I am assuming your image buffer is properly created and filled. Your call to CImg is wrong. By default the number of channels are set to 1, so it is expecting a Black and White buffer. I am sure that is not what you want. You want 3 channels if its RGB or 4 for RGBA/ARGB/BGRA etc. CImg ( const t *const values, const unsigned int size_x, const ...


0

You don't create an OpenGL context. Plain simple as that. Without a OpenGL context created and being active on the current thread all OpenGL function calls are no-ops.


0

No. A triangle strip is always built from the previous two vertices.


4

std::string vertShaderSource = LoadFileToString(vertShaderPath); std::string fragShaderSource = LoadFileToString(vertShaderPath); ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ wat Don't try to use a vertex shader as a fragment shader. Recommend querying the compilation and link status/logs while assembling the shader: #include <GL/...


1

Your MVP matrix is constant for every particle, so they will all be rendered at the same position on the screen. I believe you had each particle have a different vertex position before and tried to quickly change to using a single sprite and drawing multiple instances of it, one for each particle. Please note that you then need to have the transformation ...


0

I've tested the code below and it seems to work. (Note the usage of GL_BGR in glGetTexImage()). cv::Mat get_ocv_img_from_gl_img(GLuint ogl_texture_id) { glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, ogl_texture_id); GLenum gl_texture_width, gl_texture_height; glGetTexLevelParameteriv(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_TEXTURE_WIDTH, (GLint*)&gl_texture_width); ...


0

Firstly one of the limiting factors in your code seems to be the scaled() function. Try taking it out and you should see some speed-up. Other problem is simply the limitation of performance of QImage. Refer this question for more information. How can QPainter performance be improved? QPainter will use software rasterizer to draw QImage instances. ...


0

First you need to bind the texture you want to retrieve and then get its dimensions. Figure out a contiguous memory region to put the data into that matches OpenGL's requirements. Finally use glGetTexImage to obtain the pixels. Pseudocode: GLint width,height,alignment; glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, textureID); glGetIntegerv(GL_PACK_ALIGNMENT, &...


0

You should not mix QOpenGL and QGL (remove QGLFunctions and so the old, deprecated OpenGL module in your project configuration). You don't need to include gl.h and glext.h. You included QOpenGLBuffer. The method map() encapsulates glMapBuffer: // creation QOpenGLBuffer buffer = new QOpenGLBuffer(QOpenGLBuffer::VertexBuffer); buffer->create(); // ...


2

Before you can use any OpenGL resources, you need to create an OpenGL context. This example shows how to set up a context using GLUT: https://github.com/matus-chochlik/oglplus/blob/develop/example/standalone/001_hello_glut_glew.cpp Essentially, you need this part: #include <iostream> #include <GL/glew.h> #include <GL/glut.h> #include &...


1

It looks like you're unclear over what coordinate system your original curve is in, and how you're applying a rotation to it. With your current code, you're just rotating the points by a variable amount, but keep them all within the same plane. You can tell from just looking at the code superficially: You never set a value for the y-coordinate of any of the ...


0

It is unlikely that you will be able to do this. Docker is not running natively on OS X. It is running within a virtual machine on your Mac. As such, it would be non-trivial to access the video card to render the visual for your output.


1

It is ok. glUniform documentation says: Either the i, ui or f variants may be used to provide values for uniform variables of type bool, bvec2, bvec3, bvec4, or arrays of these. The uniform variable will be set to false if the input value is 0 or 0.0f, and it will be set to true otherwise.


2

-m32, when used with a x86-64 compiler does not mean "compile this program for i386", but actually means "create a program for x86-64 CPUs using only instructions that operate on 32 bit registers". What you have there is some binary that has been compiled for native i386 and now try to combine it with a program that's compile for x86-64 with just 32 bit ...


2

This must mean that you cannot connect through ssh. Do the following to install it: sudo apt-get install ssh Then follow instructions. Then to be sure you can test locally if ssh works properly: ssh me@localhost ju@ju-HP-Compaq-dc7900-Small-Form-Factor:~$ ssh ju@localhost The authenticity of host 'localhost (127.0.0.1)' can't be established. ECDSA ...


1

Looks like extenal/lib is full of 32 bit precompiled archives. You could track each one down and recompile (or use shared libraries), but that'll be a massive PITA. Just because your OS supports i386 doesn't mean you've got the libraries installed. In this case of that program, it's enough to install libc6-dev-i386 and freeglut3-dev:i386 packages. PS: No ...


1

Attach a R32F or R16F texture to a FBO and render to it. Then extract the pixels with glGetTexImage2D() like you would do with glReadPixels().


1

Using stencil flipping should be the most efficient raster-based method to do this. Do one pass to populate the stencil buffer ( e.g. glStencilOp(GL_KEEP, GL_KEEP,GL_INVERT)) and a second pass with a full-screen quad that sets the color depending on the stencil buffer's values (e.g. glStencilFunc(GL_EQUAL, 1 ,1))


0

If raster is OK for you, calculate all cross points of edges vs line (list of intersections per line). Put horizontal lines between raster lines, so [for square] line above has no edge intersections, line under has two intersections. Now go for every line from left to right per intersection, you start "outside", and every intersection you invert the current ...


1

Among other problems stated in answers and comments, your position and texcoord attribute locations are wrong: glVertexAttribPointer(0, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, vertices); glVertexAttribPointer(2, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, coordTexture); The first parameter is the location. It's assigned by the driver and you're just assuming that those locations are ...


1

program->setUniformValue("tex", tex); The tex variable is a handle to a texture, while you need to set the texture unit. Change it into glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0); program->setUniformValue("tex", 0);


3

According to this document there is no built-in access for the fragment color in the fragment shader. What you could do is render your previous passes in another textures, send those textures to the GPU (as uniforms) and do the blending in your last pass.


0

GL_LUMINANCE16UI is no depth buffer format and will most likely not work. A list of available depth buffer formats is here. also, you probably shouldn't bind the texture itself but instead attach it to the framebuffer with glFrameBufferTexture2D and GL_DEPTH_ATTACHMENT.


0

FYI this was filed as a radar issue and marked fixed in the next major OS version - 10.12 Sierra. A coworker validated the fix.


1

As far as i know, you cannot bind textures with any of the depth formats as images, and thus cannot write to depth format textures in compute shaders. See glBindImageTexture documentation, it lists the formats that your texture format must be compatible to. Depth formats are not among them and the specification says the depth formats are not compatible to ...


0

I realize this is not a new question, but I thought I would share some information for anyone else who makes it to this question/answer without knowing much about rendering in OpenGL (Knowing these terms helps a lot so you aren't just guessing mix-and-matching) Note that this site is how I learned most of this myself, so more complete information can be ...


2

Your shaders shouldn't compile: glShaderSource(VertexShader, 1, VertexShaderSource, NULL); This tells the GL that it should expect an array of 1 GLchar pointers. However, your GLSL code is actually split into several individual strings (note the commas); static const GLchar *VertexShaderSource[] = { "...GLSL-code..." "...GLSL-code..." "......


0

I used instanced rendering a while ago when rendering particles, so we'll see if this can point you in the right direction. Before your game loop you will call a function where you render your scene. In the function you can setup the model matrices like this, so you can have each cube at a different position in the world: //matrices for the cubes //set ...


0

The question, as asked, seems to be saying "How do I create a text file parser and use the data I just loaded to create an array of values to pass to GPU", which is not trivial. 1st. You need to have all of your point data in a text file and in a format you are able to access (it could be anything, one point per line, defined by 4 floating point values ...


1

So, my question is, whether it is possible to use GPU for off-screen rendering in order to make rendering process faster. In principle yes, but so far no standard API on how to do it was settled down for. If you're using NVidia GPUs you can use headless EGL with the Nvidia proprietary drivers: https://devblogs.nvidia.com/parallelforall/egl-eye-opengl-...


1

This is most likely due to floating-point imprecisions created during rasterization (interpolation, perspective correction) and worsened by the normalization in the fragment shader to fetch the correct texels. But this is also a problem with mipmaps : to calculate which level to use, the UV of adjacent pixels are retrieved to know if the texture is ...


1

There are a few changes needed, which are all quite simple. Texture target Where you currently use TextureTarget.Texture2D, you will use TextureTarget.TextureCubeMap instead. For example, assuming that you already have a given cube map texture: GL.BindTexture(TextureTarget.TextureCubeMap, textureID); Sampler type in shader code In your fragment shader, ...


1

two ideas: you have to use float textures, otherwise your values are clamped to the [0;1] range, or in case of your normals, you can scale and bias them to that range (and use smaller formats than 32F/16F) unless you are changing the light's position on CPU side to be in view coordinates, you're calculating with view positions (from your position g-buffer),...



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