New answers tagged

0

as I can see here glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, this->indices.size(), GL_UNSIGNED_INT, 0); you draw all vertexes as triangles. And that is how you load indices from assimp for (GLuint i = 0; i < mesh->mNumFaces; i++) { aiFace face = mesh->mFaces[i]; for (GLuint j = 0; j < face.mNumIndices; j++) ...


0

sf::Sprite is not a texture manipulator, which means that the texture returned by sf::Sprite::getTexture() will not be modified. That's why the Sprite's ctor takes a reference to a const texture instance. If you're solely interested in image manipulation, I'd recommend using something else than SFML as you might get better features/performance for specific ...


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Before answering the main question, let's cover some misinformation: I know that you're supposed to only call OpenGL functions in the thread that created the OpenGL context. This is not true. You must call OpenGL functions only on the thread where the context is current. You can make an OpenGL context current in a different thread (which will ...


0

I switched back to matrices for my solution, because for me they are easier to work with at the moment. There are few things i need to understand about quarternions then I can fix my old problem. glm::mat4 rotationMatrix = glm::translate(cameraPosition_ - glm::vec3(1.0)); rotationMatrix *= glm::rotate(mouseDelta.x, glm::vec3(0, 1, 0)); ...


-1

sf::Sprite::getTexture returns a pointer to a texture, but you're trying to assign it to a texture object (which is distinct from a pointer to a texture object). You can either declare a pointer to a texture variable: sf::Texture* spriteTexture = sprite.getTexture(); spriteTexture->copyToImage().saveToFile("Something/Place/img.png"); or you can do it ...


3

The coordinates you use do not span a equilateral triangle. Equilateral triangles always have three sides with the same length. In your example, the bottom side has a length of 0.9, but the other two have a length of sqrt(0.45^2 + 1.0^2) = 1.097. Even when assuming that you took 0.45 instead of 0.5, this is still not equilateral. (Bottom = 1.0, Other sides = ...


0

So I found what the problem is. Within the update method, I would bind the VAO and the problem was that I assumed this also bound the VBO for editing which apparently never happened. So when I called glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeOfVertices(), &vertices[0], GL_STATIC_DRAW); I thought I was modifying the VBO within the VAO, but I was actually ...


1

Notice that the original Bresenham's circle algorithm works only with integers. Since your update is x_{n+1}=x_n+eps you can modify your y update to y_{n+1}^2 = y_n^2 - 2*eps*n-eps*eps The derivation is the same as the one given at the wiki page. public void display(GLAutoDrawable drawable) { final GL2 gl = drawable.getGL().getGL2(); gl.glBegin ...


0

Try this. I don't have java on the computer I am on right now, so let's see if it works. Make sure to work with integers since what you are normalizing are the block sizes! Edit: Added integers. public void display(GLAutoDrawable drawable) { final GL2 gl = drawable.getGL().getGL2(); gl.glBegin (GL2.GL_POINTS); double radius = ...


3

I believe the problem is with the way you bind your output buffer. The critical line is here: layout (location = 3) out float out_shadow; You seem to assume that the value 3 is needed to match the index of the color attachment of the FBO you render to: glFramebufferTexture2D ( GL_FRAMEBUFFER, GL_COLOR_ATTACHMENT0 + ...


0

Finally! Enlightenment! You are right, peppe. The timer does work, I was putting it in the wrong place. The place I didn't think of was putting it in the main functions after calling window.show(). Here is what I was doing, and what worked: class mainWindow(QtWidgets.QMainWindow): def __init__(self): super().__init__() #Window stuff here ...


0

The code will crash because you are accessing data outside of the buffers. In the constructor, you create buffers with size NULL: glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, NULL, NULL, GL_STATIC_DRAW) Note that the pointer type NULL is totally invalide for the size argument of that call, but that is not the issue here. When you call the addVertex method, you append ...


0

I found at least one mistake. This: float _x = x - x_pos; float _z = z - z_pos; Should be this: float _x = (x / lato) - x_pos; float _z = (z / lato) - z_pos; Thats why it works at lato = 1.


3

You need to compile your shader in order to get an errorlog. Pseudo Code: glCompileShader(shader); GLint status; glGetShaderiv(shader, GL_COMPILE_STATUS, &status); if(status == GL_FALSE) { GLint infolog_length; glGetShaderiv(shader, GL_INFO_LOG_LENGTH, &infolog_length); GLchar[] infolog = new GLchar[infolog_length+1]; ...


2

If your OpenGL usage is OpenGL ES 2.0 compatible (you're not using non ES 2.0 features) then you can compile the C++ into JavaScript with emscripten. Once you've done that you can use your C++ code in the browser. At that point you can either render in WebGL from JavaScript as well and combine by using the same WebGLRenderingContext as emscripten OR by ...


8

Did you set the canvas to be non-premultilied? gl = someCanvas.getContext("webgl", { premultipliedAlpha: false }); The default for WebGL is true. The default for most OpenGL apps is false On top of that WebGL is composited with the rest of the page. At a minimum that's the background color of the canvas or whatever it's inside (the body of your ...


2

Updating and drawing your scene are two very different things. You need to understand how each framework treats these two app events. In some cases, OpenGL runs in its own thread, calling any "gl" method from another thread would break the call. But I digress. Here's my $.02 on the matter of your conflict: Order, structure and form are important! ...


0

Apparently everything works if I use: glTexImage3D(GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY, 0, eFormat, uiWidth, uiHeight, uiNumTextures, 0, eFormat, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, NULL); instead of: glTexStorage3D(GL_TEXTURE_2D_ARRAY, 1, // ...


0

I have figured out the problem, posting for info in case anyone runs into similar problems in future. While building up the model, view and projection matrices I introduced a mix of row major and column major matrices. These were introduced because numpy and OpenGL require the matrices in different formats. When operating alone these matrices worked because ...


2

Since you said you are working from glm::perspective, let's analyze your code compared to it. There is a critical incongruency: glm::perspective assert(aspect != valType(0)); assert(zFar != zNear); #ifdef GLM_FORCE_RADIANS valType const rad = fovy; #else valType const rad = glm::radians(fovy); #endif valType tanHalfFovy = tan(rad / ...


2

When you press CTRL+D key doesn't equal 'd' or 'D' it equals to EOT End of transmission and equal to this key == 0x04 (more info here) so you need add to your if expression else if (key == 'd' || key == 'D' || key == 0x04) next when you press ALT and CTRL simultaneously glutGetModifiers() will return you combination of any of the following symbolic ...


0

I'm intentionally posting this as a second answer, since it's almost entirely different. This one does not use geometry shaders, but uses instanced rendering instead. It might be somewhat unconventional, but I can't think of a reason why it couldn't work. The very first part is the same. You create a single 4-component vertex attribute that contains the ...


0

A geometry shader should be able to handle this. Since it's a little simpler, I'll illustrate it with drawing lines. If you read up more on geometry shaders, I'm sure you can figure out how to pass in the width, and generate triangles instead. The basic idea is that you pass the [x1, y1, x2, y2] values as a single vec4 attribute into the vertex shader. ...


0

You can make use of Unity UI system to render sprites according to your needs. Here is an article from Oculus describing how to tweak Unity UI system for VR : https://developer.oculus.com/blog/unitys-ui-system-in-vr/ Outside Unity, you would use quad layers to render on top of eyes FOV. Here is layers described in Oculus Rift documentation : ...


0

Error in code: Matrix4 _model_view_projection = _projection * _view * _model; Must be: Matrix4 _model_view_projection = _model * _view * _projection; // For OpenTK, Pencil.Gaming ... That's because OpenTK use row-major matrices (they are transposed). In C# you must multiply matrices in this way (not in the shaders).


0

Found it out myself ^^ i forgot to add this to void renderLights : cam.position.set(positionX,positionY, 0);


0

I suppose you can use GLUT_STENCIL by this you can indicate all object on you're scene by index #if defined(__APPLE__) || defined(MACOSX) #include <GLUT/glut.h> #else #include <GL\freeglut.h> #endif #include <cstdlib> #include <iostream> using namespace std; float xWorldCoordinate = 0.0f; float yWorldCoordinate = 0.0f; float r = ...


4

You need to create a projection matrix. Here's a good explanation of what it is, and here's a tutorial on how to construct one. Basically, a projection matrix divides x and y by z, so that objects further away appear smaller. It also scales z, so that the furthest distance you can see (the far clipping plane) is equivalent to -1, and the closest distance ...


1

When making cross-platform shaders, we have found that most simple shaders will work fine on both. When you need to optimise those shaders for mobile, one port of call is to reduce precision using the precision qualifiers (lowp/mediump/highp). However, these will not compile on desktop glsl without #version 130 being added at the top of the shader. ...


1

Uniforms Uniforms are part of the shader program object. Thus they keep saved even when the program object is unbound. The OpenGL 4.5 Specification says to this: 7.6 Uniform Variables Uniforms in the default uniform block, except for subroutine uniforms, are program object-specific state. They retain their values once loaded, and their values ...


1

OpenGL expects matrices to be stored in column major order. So the translation vector goes into matrix elements 12, 13, and 14: orthographicMatrix[0] = 2.0f / r_l; orthographicMatrix[1] = 0.0f; orthographicMatrix[2] = 0.0f; orthographicMatrix[3] = 0.0f; orthographicMatrix[4] = 0.0f; orthographicMatrix[5] = 2.0f / t_b; orthographicMatrix[6] = 0.0f; ...


1

Is it possible to have multiple output in a vertex shader ? No, but that doesn't mean you can't get the effect of what you want. Well, you didn't describe in any real detail what you wanted, but this is as close as OpenGL can provide. What you want seems rather like layered rendering. It is the ability of a Geometry Shader to generate primitives that ...


0

Set orthographicMatrix[10] = -2.0f / f_n; You can get detailed information about calculation projection matrix. http://www.songho.ca/opengl/gl_projectionmatrix.html#ortho


2

Unfortunately, you posted too much code (~570 lines, wow!) so I can't read it all. But you are solving a very common problem, and I can give you the general solution. The problem is, "I want to draw different models using one shared VAO." This is actually a lot easier than it sounds. You can simply concatenate all of your models into the same VBOs, and ...


2

GLSL does not have pointers, so a uniform cannot be NULL. Every uniform has a value. If a shader attempts to read from a buffer (uniform, SSBO, atomic counter) which does not have an object bound to the corresponding binding point, then... well, the specification is kinda unclear on this. The 4.5 specification says: When executing shaders that access ...


3

For "normal" uniform variables I don't see any possibility how they could cause a runtime error. Since they are all of primitive types, a value like NULL is not possible. All of these variables are initialized at link time. The specification tells: 2.15.3.1 All uniform variables are read-only and are initialized externally either at link time or ...


0

do you know glulookat ? It is useful for 3D version. In this case you does not need the atan function, I suppose mouse_x and mouse_y are the deltas between your subject and the mouse, If you normalize it you get the cosine and the sine of the desired angle, from them you can create a rotation matrix and do glMultMatrix. I hope to help, Regards.


0

You need to subtract the position of your character from the position of your mouse (I assume they are in the same space). So if you show your character at e_x, e_y then you get the angle with atan2(mouse_y - e_y, mouse_x - e_x).


2

Adjust your texture coordinates based on your aspect ratio. For instance, if your tile has a 2:1 (width:height) aspect, your texture coordinates will range from 0-2 on X rather than 0-1. This will cause the texture to tile twice in X. You'll need to check to see if X is greater than Y or visa-versa. If the former, scale your X by quadWidth / quadHeight. ...


-1

The association of buffer, generic vertex attribute and shader attribute variable are quite subtle. glVertexAttribPointer establishes this association. See OpenGL-Terminology for a pretty good explanation. A section of it is copied here for easy reference. Initialize the shader. The program has attribute variables which process the vertex data to produce ...


0

I think you should look at this to get the right numbers: self.hOffset = (self.wOffset / (16.0 / 9.0)); self.xOffset = ((int)ceil((_backingWidth / 2.0) - ((_backingWidth + self.wOffset) / 2.0))); self.yOffset = ((int)ceil((_backingHeight / 2.0) - ((_backingHeight + self.hOffset) / 2.0))); glViewport(self.xOffset, self.yOffset, _backingWidth + ...


2

Xamarin.Forms has a OpenGLView View and it can be used within a Xamarin.Forms page amongst other controls. There is some examples, using Xamarin.Forms with this here. Do note, however that this is only available in iOS and Android however. Along with MonoGame, you have Urho which is mentioned on the Xamarin website that you may want to look into, link ...


0

After some reading about Hammersley Points on the Hemisphere and understanding them I managed to use the code provided in Real Shading in Unreal Engine 4 and sample the cube map, thus giving a much better result. Things are going pretty slow but I am getting there eventually and hopefully I am doing the right thing so far with implementation. This is how ...


0

Yes. You can read the vertex shader output with transform feedback. You can read the fragment shader output with glReadPixels().


2

Sticking with the GLU call, the one you're looking for is, quite intuitively, gluPartialDisk(). For a quarter circle: gluPartialDisk(myobject, 0.0, 40.0, 60, 4, 0.0, 90.0); The last two arguments specify the starting angle and the sweep angle, both in degrees. Note that GLU is very deprecated, and only works with legacy versions of OpenGL. For sample ...


0

void gluDisk( GLUquadric* quad, GLdouble inner, GLdouble outer, GLint slices, GLint loops); The disk is subdivided around the z axis into slices (like pizza slices) Try playing with the slice, 2 means half circle i think. [edit] dont forget with the loops too."and also about the z axis into rings (as specified by slices and loops, ...


3

Question 1 glFrontFace determines wind order Wind order means, what order a set of vertexes should appear for a normal to be considered positive. Consider the triangle below. It's vertexes are defined clockwise. If we told OpenGL glFrontFace(GL_CW) (That clockwise means front face) then the normal would essentially be sticking right out of the screen ...


0

On most hardware, it's the graphic rendering chip that clips the triangles at the frame buffer borders (or the clipping region). The geometry and fragments outside the frame buffer are discarded as early as possible while rendering. The fragment shader is not called for these fragments outside the buffer.


0

The UVs that you provide to your geometry define what pieces of your texture are drawn. It is entirely up to the hardware to define how that texture gets plastered on to your geometry, which is why I won't comment on: is it discarded or is it actually drawn outside of the triangle to elsewhere but not made visible? However, you can assume that the ...


0

I think it is fine: The 2nd glDisable and glEnable is written into the list and will be executed later, when the list is displayed. Putting it in the list, does not immediately change the state.



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