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0

So the answer is simple - don't multiply matrix x vector, multiple vector x matrix in the shader.


0

This one is quite obvious, isn't it? vec4 textureColor = ... [...] if (textureColor == 0) You can't compare a vec4 to a scalar. You could use somehting like if (textureColor == vec4(0) ). However, comparing floating point values for equality is a bad idea in most cases. I really would recommend you use a different approach, like testing for ...


1

glPerspective() is better approach for 3D rendering instead of glOrtho(). Use glPerspective() to create the viewing volume. When I replaced glOrtho() expression by gluPerspective(45f, (float) WIDTH / (float) HEIGHT, 0.1f, 100f); I got the perfect cube.


3

Your cube is clipped by the front and near planes. Your cube has an extent of of 1.5, and its center is 1 units away from your "camera", but your clipping range is just [-1,1] (relative to the camera), so that the farther edges will be out of the viewing frustum.


2

When you call functions like glTranslate*() or glRotate*() in your camera class (or a function is called which uses them, like gluLookAt()), the functions will NOT set your view matrix to a specific state, but just transform them. That means when this functions are called over and over by your display function without calling glLoadIdentity() between every ...


0

I dont' know how your camera.lookAt() is exactly implemented, but I'm making the educated guess that it uses something like gluLookAt(). Now gluLookAt() (like all of GL matrix functions except glLoad*()) multiplies the current matrix of the currently selected matrix mode by the LookAt matrix it creates internally. In most cases, you want that current matrix ...


4

This is very easy to do. Where you currently use texture coordinates in the range [0.0, 1.0], you simply use a bigger range. For example, to repeat the texture twice, as shown in your example, you specify texture coordinates in the range [0.0, 2.0]. This works in combination with using GL_REPEAT for the texture wrap mode: glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, ...


1

You're very close. The only thing I see missing is that you do not bind the correct buffer before calling glVertexAttribPointer(). When you call glVertexAttribPointer(), you specify that the data for the attribute will be pulled from the buffer that is currently bound to GL_ARRAY_BUFFER. Your LoadAttributeVariables() method should therefore be: GLuint ...


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If you execute glfwSetCursorPos() inside your mouse callback, you can get to the situation that this creates a new mouse event, and after your callback exited, glfwPollEvents() will loop over the remaining events, so you effectively enter some endless loop here. You should just delay such actions after the input callbacks have been handled. However, even ...


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Put in few words: You can't create arbitrary OpenGL contexts for MemDCs. At least no kind of OpenGL context you'd actually want to use. If your goal is off-screen rendering either create a PBuffer-DC; which requires to create a OpenGL context first which in turn required to create a window and setting its pixel format. Or you can just create a window and a ...


4

This can't be done in a useful way. You can in principle render to a bitmap by using the PFD_DRAW_TO_BITMAP flag instead of PFD_DRAW_TO_WINDOW in the PIXELFORMATDESCRIPTOR. However, doing so will disable all hardware accelearated rendering. This will fall back to Microsofts default OpenGL 1.1 implementation. If you want hw-accleration and/or modern GL, ...


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I had to define SFML_STATIC as a preprocessor instead of inside the code.


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The sampler data types in GLSL reference the texture unit, not a texture object. By default, uniforms will be initialized to 0, so if you don't set the sampler uniforms, they will sample from texture unit 0 (which is also the default unit). In your ProgramManager::LoadTexture() method, you bind the newly created texture, and very likely you are still using ...


3

Because it needs to be constant expression, which is not in your case.


1

I think this is because sunPosition is not a constant. Looking at this page https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=25830, it seems that when you initialize a constant, you can't base it on something that could vary. "Initializers for const declarations must be constant expressions"


4

your code works only for first octant so I hope you are testing only there you have forgot to mix the background color and line color so add transparency or read the background pixel directly and mix colors on your own the a,a0 coefficients would be the alpha for transparency color mixing in that case you should not change the r,g,b values but the ...


1

To fix this, I need to do the snapping in light space, not world space: viewMat[3][0] -= glm::mod(viewMat[3][0], 2.f * split / texSize); viewMat[3][1] -= glm::mod(viewMat[3][1], 2.f * split / texSize); viewMat[3][2] -= glm::mod(viewMat[3][2], 2.f * split / texSize); Old (Wrong) answer: So, I revisited this today and managed to solve it in about 10 ...


1

But how does it work at sample level.? and how does it determine which samples to cover out of 8? This is completely up to the implementation. If the aplha is 0.5, then GL_SAMPLE_ALPHA_TO_COVERAGE will just create a coverage mask with half of the available bits set (think of dithering). What the GL spec actually requires is just (quoting section ...


0

I am reading image and binding textures like this: ilEnable(IL_ORIGIN_SET); ilOriginFunc(IL_ORIGIN_LOWER_LEFT); // set [0,0] of texture to bottom left corner ilImage image; GLuint ind; glGenTextures(1, &ind); glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, ind); image.Load(L"<path>");// or just name.format be sure to have image in correct folder. When ...


1

For anything beyond GL 1.1 (and glActiveTexture is beyond that), you have to use OpenGL's extension mechanism. Qt can do that for you all under the hood, have a look at the QAbstractOpenGLFunctions class hierarchy You can get the context the widget has created via QOpenGLWidget::context and the QAbstractOpenGLFunctions of the context via ...


1

On OSX, OpenGL is part of the Operating System API. As a result, the OpenGL version is limited by the OSX version no matter what the GPU is capable of. Currenly (as of mid 2015), OSX 10.10 will support at most GL 4.1. There is no support for OpenGL compute shaders at all, on this platform. Have a look at Apple's OpenGL capabilities tabe for more details. ...


0

sphere-sphere collision is quite easy. Just take the distance between the two sphere centers and then add the two radii of the spheres and compare them with the distance. if d < (r1+r2) then they collided. To get a top-down look with gluLookAt you can do this if I'm not mistaken gluLookAt(0.0, 5.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0); basically sets ...


0

I spot some issues with your code: float diffuse_intensity = max(dot(N, L), 100); This one does not make sense at all. As N and L are normalized, the dot product will be in [0,1], and that max will always yield 100. You want max(..., 0) there to just clamp negative values to 0. This one vec4 diffuse_final = diffuse_intensity*vec4(0.0, 0.0, 2.8, 2.0); ...


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For those using SDL2, it needs to be right after SDL_CreateRenderer.


0

What you see here is the GL_LINEAR texture magnification mode (aka "bilinear filtering", which your code explicitely requests) in combination with the default GL_REPEAT texture coordinate repetition at the borders. I'm not 100% which of the two things you don't want. You might try changing glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D,GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER,GL_LINEAR); ...


2

Not sure if this would help you, but i implmented ray-picking (calculating ray's direction) this way: glm::vec3 CFreeCamera::CreateRay() { // these positions must be in range [-1, 1] (!!!), not [0, width] and [0, height] float mouseX = getMousePositionX() / (getWindowWidth() * 0.5f) - 1.0f; float mouseY = getMousePositionY() / ...


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There are NShader builds available for VS2013 (though not official i guess) - i'm using it myself. Don't want to steal someone's work - you can find them at the bottom of this thread (IssamK's post).


0

You are using the "matrix * vector" multiplication order in your shader. You must build your matrices following this convention. OpenGL will use column major order for matrices, so your setPosition function creates a matrix where it put the x and y translation parts into the last row instead of the last column. Now this has no effect at all, because in your ...


0

glBufferDataARB() and glBufferData() serve the same purpose. The ARB in the first form indicates that the entry point is part of an extension approved by the OpenGL ARB (Architecture Review Board). The second form is part of the standard OpenGL specification. The common process is that new OpenGL features are first provided as extensions. They can then go ...


1

Given that the interop does not work for examples provided with the CUDA installation (can be found in ProgramData/Nvidia Corporation/Examples), the problem is not the code, but rather the computer's configuration. I did, for good measure, first unistall all of my old CUDA versions and reinstalled CUDA 7.0. That didn't fix anything, so I moved on. The ...


0

This answer mainly focuses on the OP's comment on Cagkan Toptas answer: Thanx for the answer, but my question is: why does it give better results? Does it at all? If yes, what is the explanation?" It depends on how you define "better" results. From an image qualioty perspective, it does not change much, as long as the primitves are not specifically ...


1

It seems like you have the GL_DEPTH_TEST enabled. I don't know what projection matrix and z values you use for drawing your foreground objects, but gl_Position = vec4(a_vertex.xy, 0.0 ,1); is setting clip space z of the background to 0. Assuming a perspecitve projection, this is redicolously close to the front plane. Assuming some prthographic ...


1

Maybe this is not the answer to your problem, but I try to answer your question from ray tracing perspective. In ray tracing, you can get color of every single points in the scene. But since we have a limited amount of pixel, you need to downsample to your image to your screen pixels. In ray tracing, if you use 1 ray per pixel, we generally choose center ...


0

Before reading the answers of question, I suggest you to read how translate/rotate/scale is done with model matrix When you need to transform your object, you simply perform operation for each vertex that your object has. P = [x,y,z,1] -- your point in 3D M = [..] -- your 4x4 rotation matrix M * P -- your rotation operation In the light of ...


0

The "Could not create GLFW window!" message makes very clear what is going on. You did not get a GLFW window, but you don't abort the program in this case, and go further on with your render() function, feeding NULL to glfWindowShouldClose(). You really should remove the glfwWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_FORWARD_COMPAT, GL_TRUE); if you are not going to request ...


0

Right, after a long night's work at this problem and trawling through GLFW's documentation again I noticed that the problem lay with the macro GLFWCALL. C++ was treating it as a method in it's own right and as a result ignoring the actual method. GLFW's documentation explained why: The GLFWCALL macro, which made callback functions use __stdcall on ...


0

To correct the error, you just have to invert the rotation of the quaternion you get by conjugating it like this: using namespace glm; quat orientation = conjugate(toQuat(lookAt(vecA, vecB, up))); My best guess for the cause would be, that glm makes it a rotation the camera has to rotate the world with, which is opposite of the viewers rotation.


0

I figured I'll post the maya code I'm using. Apparently there's orthographic attribute in maya that helps calculate this called "Orthographic Width" based off derhass's answer. # Get view matrix. view = OpenMayaUI.M3dView.active3dView() mayaProjMatrix = OpenMaya.MMatrix() view.projectionMatrix(mayaProjMatrix) # Get camera MFnDagPath. dagCam = ...


4

In computer graphics, a projection matrix just defines an affine or projective transformation of some volume into a defined standard volume, typically a cube. I don't know maya's conventions here, so I'm using GL's. The principles are the same in any case. In GL, the viewing volume is represented by the unit cube [-1,1] along all 3 dimensions in normalized ...


1

There is no known loader for .mb files I believe. That's because those files aren't meant to be loaded by any other applications except Maya. Try to export your scene to a different file format such as .obj or .fbx. I recommend you go with the .obj format as those are a lot easier to parse than .fbx files. For more information see here (.obj) and here ...


0

I think your problem is with matrices. When you call glTranslatef, you are transforming the OpenGL ModelView matrix. However, since OpenGL is a state-based machine, this transformation is preserved for further drawing events. The second rectangle will be translated twice. What you want to do is use the OpenGL matrix stack. I'll rewrite one of the draw ...


1

This seems related to looking through what's called "participating media". On the less extreme end, you'd have light fog, or smoky haze. In the middle could be, say, dirty water. And the extreme case would be your head-in-the-wall example. Doing this in a physically accurate way isn't trivial, because the darkening effect is more pronounced when the ...


0

There is a missing statement after else which is causing the error: if(glfwButton == GLFW_MOUSE_BUTTON_RIGHT) computeMatricesFromInputs(); else // ^ no statement here You can add a semicolon as Intellisense suggests or an empty compound statement {}: if(glfwButton == GLFW_MOUSE_BUTTON_RIGHT) { ...


2

Like so often with OpenGL it depends on the implementation (=driver) in question. For example early NVidia drivers were prone for complete shader recompilation when Uniform values changed (so changing a uniform could be much more expensive than switching a texture or shader). Later this bottleneck was removed and changing a uniform value became a rather ...


1

You must create a OpenGL context before CUDA will recognize OpenGL capable devices. glutCreateWindows is what creates a OpenGL context when using GLUT.


0

Most OpenGL calls only work when you have setup GL context and bind that to either physical window or window-less frame buffer. The method setSize is called in general messaging loop and does not guarantee GL context is set up. In fact, it might be setup and bound to different window, so you will be tampering with some other view. Propagate your desired ...


1

There are also AMD extensions which might be of some relevance to this qeustion: WGL_AMD_gpu_association and GLX_AMD_gpu_association: While this extension's focus is assigning GL context to specific GPUs and efficiently copying data between GPUs, it might also be useful for two contexts on the same GPU: To provide an accelerated path for blitting data ...


1

The program has its own normalize function. Each triangular face is recursively divided into four equal sized smaller triangles, by finding the midpoint of each edge. These midpoints are in the wrong position to sit on the surface of a sphere, so the normalize function is used to equalize the radius of each interpolated point from the centre of the sphere ...


1

The question is very old but the answer could help others. You need to use true pixel coordinates if you use sampler2DRect. I assume you copy the incoming texture coordinates in the vertex shader to your varying_texcoord. If you do so, you need to compute the coordinates: vec2 coords = varying_texcoord * imageSize(image); Then pass the coordinates: ...


0

I found one bug in your code, you need to call glNormal3f and glTexCoord2f before glVertex3f. Also obj can contains different settings for material, it is not simple texture only. The current texture coordinates are part of the data that is associated with each vertex and with the current raster position. (About glTexCoord) From ...



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