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PROBLEM HAS SOLVED : white OBJ = new Model("C:/Users/username/Desktop/OBJ.obj"); into initializeGL() instead of constructor. Thanks to datenwolf !!


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After lots of reading the only way I found to accomplish what I was trying to do was erasing code and putting my simulate method inside of the display function. Here is how the code finally worked: glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_DOUBLE | GLUT_RGB | GLUT_DEPTH); glutInitWindowSize(1280,720); glutCreateWindow("Network initial state"); glutDisplayFunc(display); ...


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To be able to remove hidden superficies, you need to enable the Depth Test. To do that, first you must ask, at the context creation time, a buffer to store the relative z positional value of a vertex, in relation to the camera. If you are using GLFW library, this creation is done automatically. The second step is to enable the depth test itself. To do ...


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This is the problem of skinny triangles in general. For example, in adaptive subdivision when you have skinny T-junctions, it happens all the time. One solution is to retriangulate tiny triangles by dividing two long edges into smaller edges and then connect them together to avoid such an artifact. However, the problem may still persist as you may have ...


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(Posting the solutions from the comments to make this question answered.) You are missing a semicolons on the end of these two lines: layout(location = 1) in vec3 color out vec3 Color In the future, use glGetShader with GL_COMPILE_STATUS after compiling your shader to check if compilation succeeded, and glGetShaderInfoLog to retrieve the exact errors and ...


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If you are about to design an API, I would go on exposing those camera parameters directly rather than giving a set of functions to change those indirectly. The formulas will frequently be easier to understand than some obscure names, no matter how good you may think they are. Going one step further, parametrize your camera with view and projection ...


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I think you created a bit of confusion by putting this question under the "opengl" tag. The problem is that in computer graphics, the term projection is not understood in a strictly mathematical sense. In maths, a projection is defined (and the following is not the exact mathematical definiton, but just my own paraphrasing) as something which doesn't ...


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Projection matrix must be at (0,0,0) and viewing in Z+ or Z- direction this is a must because many things in OpenGL depends on it like FOG,lighting ... so if your direction or position is different then you need to move this to camera matrix let assume your focal point is (0,0,0) as you stated and the normal vector is (0,0,+/-1) Z near is the distance ...


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Regarding MinGW you already have everything in place. GLEW is a independently developed third party library which you have to install manually. A pretty new project is Win-Builds (http://win-builds.org/doku.php) which gives you a package manager for the installation of MinGW and an assortment of libraries. You could use that. Or, if you want easier creation ...


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In Visual Studio Express Desktop 2013 , with freeglut installed, the following code : const GLubyte *Vstr; Vstr = glGetString(GL_VERSION); fprintf(stderr, "Your OpenGL version is %s\n", Vstr); results in Your OpenGL version is 4.2.0 - Build 10.18.10.3621. Version 4.2 is from 2011. See https://www.opengl.org/wiki/History_of_OpenGL. Note ...


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I've solved this problem in a really simple way. Since when I draw using OpenGL it's working, I've just created the matrices in OpenGL and then retrieved them with glGet(). Using those matrices everything is ok.


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Yes, absolutely. After the glBufferData() call returns, you can do anything you want with the data. Overwrite it, delete it, etc. The consequence is that the OpenGL implementation either has to update the buffer immediately during the call (which is somewhat against the asynchronous way that OpenGL likes to operate in), or create a temporary copy of the ...


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According to https://www.opengl.org/sdk/docs/man/html/glBufferData.xhtml this function creates "a new data store" and "the data store is initialized with data from this pointer". This means that the data is copied to a new location and it is safe to delete this original data (nothing you do to the original data after calling glBufferData will affect this gl ...


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Rather than debugging your own code, you can use transform feedback to compute the projections of your lines using the OpenGL pipeline. Rather than rasterizing them on the screen you can capture them in a memory buffer and save directly to the SVG afterwards. Setting this up is a bit involved and depends on the exact setup of your OpenGL codepath, but it ...


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One aspect to watch out for is the order of transformations. When you specify transformations using the legacy OpenGL matrix stack, they are applied to the vertices in reverse order of the order they are specified in. For example, if you have this sequence: glTranslatef(...); glRotatef(...); This means that vertices are first rotated, then translated. ...


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Well, the lookAt code provided by that library is just this (I'm leaving the actual source code out and only keep the comments, as they nicely explain the steps which are done): public final static void lookAt(Vector3f position, Vector3f centre, Vector3f up, Matrix4f dest) { // Compute direction from position to lookAt // Normalize direction ...


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The issue appeared to be linked to the chosen texture types. The texture with handle viewPosTexture needed to explicitly be defined as a float texture format GL_RGB16F or GL_RGBA32F, instead of just GL_RGB. Interestingly, the seperate textures were drawn fine, the issues arised in combination only. // generate screen color texture // note: GL_NEAREST ...


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Use the debug heap and call this at the very beginning in main(). _CrtSetDbgFlag(_CRTDBG_CHECK_ALWAYS_DF); It will slow down the program a lot but it should break as soon as corruption occurs. Refer to this article for details: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/974tc9t1.aspx#BKMK_Check_for_heap_integrity_and_memory_leaks


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I needed this for my research. I took littleimp's advice, but fixing the colors and flipping the image took valuable time to figure out. Here is what I ended up with. typedef Mat Image ; typedef struct { int width; int height; char* title; float field_of_view_angle; float z_near; float z_far; } glutWindow; glutWindow win; Image ...


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This is basic pseudocode for your main function in order to have an updating window. Although all of the code needed for functionality depends on your project. //#include Whatever you need from OpenGL here int main() { //Create window and variables //While loop to open window and keep program open while it is running //If loop to close window ...


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# include<GL/glut.h> void keys(unsigned char key, int x, int y) { if (key == 'a') paused = 1; if (key == 'A') paused = 0; glutPostRedisplay(); } add this function in your program for keyboard function and wherever u are using glutPostRedisplay() in program add if(paused == 0) above it


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Your problem is with coordinate systems and their ranges. Looking at the coordinates you use for drawing: glTexCoord2d(0.0, 0.0); glVertex2d(0.0, 0.0); glTexCoord2d(1.0, 0.0); glVertex2d(self->width, 0.0); glTexCoord2d(1.0, 1.0); glVertex2d(self->width, self->height); glTexCoord2d(0.0, 1.0); glVertex2d(0.0, self->height); The OpenGL ...


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From the linked code, we have opengl.cpp with glfwOpenWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_PROFILE, 0); // 0 lets the system choose the profile glfwOpenWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_VERSION_MAJOR, OPENGL_VERSION_MAJOR); glfwOpenWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_VERSION_MINOR, OPENGL_VERSION_MINOR); glfwOpenWindowHint(GLFW_FSAA_SAMPLES, fsaa); ...


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The simplest solution, is to use texture, that contain needed noise. If the displacement is kept in the texture, then it is possible to apply the displacement in the vertex shader, so there would be no need to modify vertex buffer. To make the waves moving, your may add some animated offset. There are plenty of ways to fake, as you say, the "random" effect. ...


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EGL is explicitly thread-safe. This means that through an extension of Vulkan you could bind a EGLSurface as a rendertarget in a pipeline or use it as a parameter for a bufferswap. This EGLSurface would be created through the normal way and the eglQueryString(display, EGL_CLIENT_APIS) of the creating EGLDisplay must then include "Vulkan". The context bit ...


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So far only very little is known about Vulkan and except for those directly involved in its development most of it remains guesswork. However there are few things we know. First and foremost Vulkan will finally do the right thing and decouple GPU access from the windowing system. There will be a loader which provides an interface to enumerate all the ...


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It's really hard to tell what's going on here. But since you mentioned that this happens under high load we can conjecture a bit. What's probably going on here is, that you're simply running out of available system resources. Creating a window triggers a cascade of allocations and if too much of that happens in a short timeframe these allocations may fail or ...


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Make sure you set the texture sampling mode. Especially min filter: glTexParameteri ( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR). The default setting is mip mapped (GL_NEAREST_MIPMAP_LINEAR) so unless you upload mip maps you will get a white read result. So either set the texture to no mip or generate them. One way to do that is to call ...


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May be you should take a look here http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/OpenGL_Programming/Scientific_OpenGL_Tutorial_01 There is good information to start drawing curves. Because you have a parametrized curve, just store your x,y in a vertex buffer object (VBO) with a size of the number of points you want on your curve and draw that VBO like that : ...


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for square spiral if needed: import java.awt.*; public class Spiral { public static void main(String[] args) { DrawingPanel panel = new DrawingPanel(170, 170); Graphics g = panel.getGraphics(); for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) { g.drawLine( 10*i, 10 + 10*i, 160 - 10*i, 10 + 10*i); // top g.drawLine(160 - 10*i, ...


1

You can use these functions before drawing: glEnable( GL_LINE_SMOOTH ); glEnable( GL_POLYGON_SMOOTH ); glHint( GL_LINE_SMOOTH_HINT, GL_NICEST ); glHint( GL_POLYGON_SMOOTH_HINT, GL_NICEST ); or you can use this before drawing: Gl.glShadeModel(Gl.GL_SMOOTH); Gl.glEnable(Gl.GL_LINE_SMOOTH); Gl.glEnable(Gl.GL_BLEND); Gl.glBlendFunc(Gl.GL_SRC_ALPHA, ...


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ETC2 and ETC formats are not commonly used by desktop applications. As such, they might not be natively supported by the desktop GPU and/or its driver. However, they are required for GLES 3.0 compatibility, so if your desktop OpenGL driver reports GL_ARB_ES3_compatibility, then it must also support the ETC2 format. Because many developers want to develop ...


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As stated in a comment, the framebuffer works without the depth and stencil renderbuffers bound. This is a common problem with GL[ES], because there is no method of querying supported combinations and/or formats. You've just got to try it and see if it works - and if it doesn't, the actual problem is not always clear. From the GLES 2.0 spec: 4.1 ...


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For me my own initial question is invalid and it has a bug!!! I – original parametric surface with domain as cartesian product of [0,1] and range of it as euclidean space II - normal to original surface III - modified original surface with heightmap IV - normal map which we want to receive with even ignoring geometric modification of the ...


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I also followed the article you presented but I generated my own recursive function as follows Drawtriangle(vecta, vectb, vectb, int max, depth) { If(Depth <= max) Add a add b add c vecd = midlepoint(veca,vecb) vece = middlepoint(vecb,vecc) Vecf = midlepoint(vecc,veca) depth++ Drawtriangle(veca,vecb,vecc,max,depth); drawtriangle(veca,vecd,vecf... ...


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If you want to know what renderers are available on your system, you can use code like this: NSOpenGLPixelFormatAttribute attrs[] = { NSOpenGLPFAOpenGLProfile, NSOpenGLProfileVersion3_2Core, // optional 0 }; NSOpenGLPixelFormat* pf = [[NSOpenGLPixelFormat alloc] initWithAttributes:attrs]; for (int i = 0; i < pf.numberOfVirtualScreens; i++) { ...


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Mix and matching header files is not a problem, because ultimately headers are just dictionaries of available symbols, used only for the compilation of the .c or .c{c,pp,xx} file currently processed by the compiler. The real trouble starts upon link time. And with OpenGL at runtime, depending on which OpenGL version profile the context has been created ...


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First and foremost the biggest CPU hog with OpenGL is immediate mode… and you're using it (glBegin, glEnd). The problem with IM is, that every single vertex requires a whole couple of OpenGL calls being made; and because OpenGL uses a thread local state this means that each and every OpenGL call must go through some indirection. So the first step would be ...


0

Unfortunately an OpenGL frameworks / driver engineer at Apple is probably the only person who can answer this question for sure but here is some information I've been able to collect. As you mention, the relevant part of the CGL documentation implies that any of the following can be used to select a software renderer (depending on your OS version): ...


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Ok, I found the answer to my conundrum and I hope it will help anyone else using CUDA-OGL together. The problem was that I was calling: checkCudaErrors(cudaGraphicsGLRegisterBuffer(&_cgr, pbo_id, cudaGraphicsRegisterFlagsNone)); everytime. This actually needs to be called only once and then I just need to call map/unmap on the _cgr ...


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You are missing the creation of the VAO; GTK+ will create GL core profile contexts, which means you need to create and select the VAO yourself, otherwise your vertex buffer objects won't be used. When initializing the GL state, add this: /* we need to create a VAO to store the other buffers */ GLuint vao; glGenVertexArrays (1, &vao); ...


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You have not set the glViewport, this may give you problems. Another possibility is that you have the matrix set to something other than identity. Ensure that you have reset the model-view and projection matrices to identity (or what you want them to be) before glBegin(GL_POLYGON) in UpdateScoreTexture() (You may wish to push the matrices to the stack before ...


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Ok so this post is old I know but I just happened to find it while looking for something else. Answering anyway since it may help other people in the future. GLUT actually supports the events of ALT... being pressed. GLUT_ACTIVE_SHIFT – Set if either you press the SHIFT key, or Caps Lock is on. Note that if they are both on then the constant is not ...


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... this suggestion is absolutely not true The contrary: it is absolutely true. The meaning of the word "heightmap" assumes that it is a function z(x,y) that thus describes a surface (x, y, z(x,y)). The rest follows. You cannot represent arbitrary bijection from SxT to R3 with a heightmap. How do you represent a punctured sphere with a heightmap? You ...


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//no real explanation of what this is..... #include <common/shader.hpp> Probably something the author of that tutorial wrote himself and simply dumped into the project sources, without telling anything more. The most annoying part about this lines is the use of wedge brackets (<…>) instead of quotes ("…") because this misleadingly suggests ...


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The function LoadShaders() is not part of OpenGL, and it is not part of any of the libraries you are using (I see GLEW and GLFW). In short, LoadShaders() is missing. My guess is that LoadShaders() is a function that the author of the tutorial wrote, but the formatting for the tutorial is a bit frustrating (to say the least!) so I'm not sure.


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The effect you see is called Aliasing, and can be resolved using an antialiasing techneque.The are multiple antialiasing tecneques possible but by far the most common at the moment is MSAA (multisample antialiasing) https://www.opengl.org/wiki/Multisampling. MSAA is quick and easy from a developer's point of view as support is provided in modern drivers and ...


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WebGL shaders follow the GLSL ES 1.017 spec https://www.khronos.org/registry/gles/specs/2.0/GLSL_ES_Specification_1.0.17.pdf That's different than Desktop OpenGL in several ways. One it's the 1.0 version of GLSL ES where as desktop GL at version 4.2. One big difference between WebGL GLSL and many articles found about shaders on the internet is there's no ...


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Either option will work if you apply it correctly. You have control over row padding/size with a set of GL_UNPACK_* parameters you can set with glPixelStorei(). From the question, and the format used in the code, it looks like you have a 1 byte/pixel format. Most of my answer should apply to other formats as well, but I'll use that for the calculation. The ...


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Many thanks to Svante for leading me in the right direction. Here is what worked: (setf mystream (open rgb-file-name :direction :input :element-type '(unsigned-byte 8))) (setf data (make-array (file-length mystream) :element-type '(unsigned-byte 8))) (read-sequence data mystream) (close mystream)



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