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1

You are paying for the more for the conversion from full float to half float each time you change the data than you would for the 2 bytes you save per half float. So check what saves you more in the long run, less memory bandwidth or spending more time filling the VBO. If the CPU is idle often (waiting for vsync) then optimizing bandwidth at the cost of ...


0

There are two variables called cameraPos: One in global scope which is used in key_callback and a local one in main (inside the while loop) which is set to a constant value and is used to create the view-matrix. Solution: Remove the local variable in main and just use the global one.


1

You redefine cameraPos inside the while loop, this shadows the global cameraPos you update in the doMovement function. Just remove the declarations from inside the while.


-1

Ask Simon McLoughlin for the anwser


0

JOGL 2.5.1 API? I can only find version 2.2.4 JOGAMP. Now I'm also learning JOGL and practicing with code in superbible. It's OK using "#version 400 core", but there are problems when I use "#version 430 core".


0

So here is what I did to have it work perfectly. The processHits method : void processHits(GLint inHits, GLuint buffer[]) { unsigned int i, j; GLuint names, *ptr, minZ,*ptrNames, numberOfNames; ptr = (GLuint *) buffer; minZ = 0xffffffff; for (i = 0; i < inHits; i++) { names = *ptr; ptr++; if (*ptr < minZ) ...


3

It's a very old technique for drawing a shape without clearing the screen. If you want to draw a moving rectangle, the idea is to draw only the difference between the previous frame and the new one (adding the new parts, erasing the old ones, leaving the common part untouched). The XOR trick is that if you draw something with it, it sets your color to the ...


0

Try connecting with ssh -X, then running the command DISPLAY=:0 after logging in, before starting the program. I.e. $ ssh -X YOURCOMP ... $ DISPLAY=:0 $ ./[run gl program] For a view as to what happens if you omit -X, and also setting DISPLAY For an explanation of what -X does For an explanation of DISPLAY=:0 All in all, it might let you access the ...


0

There are a huge variety of ways to do most things in OpenGL. Off the top of my head I'd probably use a series of triangle strips drawn with color blending.


0

After all, this was one of those mistakes that make you want to hit your head on a wall. GL_COMPRESSED_RGBA8_ETC2_EAC was actually not supported on the board. I copied it from the headers but it did not query the device for supported formats. I can use a DXT5 format just fine with this code.


0

Why do you expect to see the left wall? It is off-screen (for any reasonable aspect ratios of your window). If we imagine some "world space", you'll have the folliwing situation: Your camera is placed at the origin and looking at almost diagonal vector. The lfet wall is placed at x=0 too, so you have almost 45 degrees between the view direction and the wall. ...


3

It's a bug in freeglut. Download the source, look at freeglut_cursor.c , wonder who cleans up the cursor cache when the X11 display is closed. The answer is, sadly, no one. You can easily fix it yourself and optionally submit a patch to freeglut maintainers, or just file a bug to them.


2

I'm using SDL's built-in function SDL_GL_GetAttribute which returns the values that SDL uses to create the context, not the actual context attributes (as I understand it). This is incorrect, I took a look at the SDL implementation of SDL_GL_GetAttribute (...) (see src/video/SDL_video.c) and it does what I described. You cannot query the values on a core ...


2

The array of draw buffers is not a global state, but rather it is stored per-framebuffer. You are probably familiar with the mechanics of Vertex Array Objects, which maintain separate sets of vertex attribute pointers; draw buffers are analogous to attribute pointers in this situation. When you make a call to glNamedFramebufferDrawBuffer (m_fbo, ...), you ...


0

Copy the PBO contents to a texture (of the same size) and then draw the texture to the full screen quad using a fragment shader that uses outputs a grayscale color based on the textures red channel input.


0

Full credit to GeirGrusom for this one. The change was as simple as setting: gl.Ortho(0.0, (double)gImage1.Width, (double)gImage1.Height, 0.0, -1.0, 1.0); to: gl.Ortho(0.0, (double)openGLControl.Width, (double)openGLControl.Height, 0.0, -1.0, 1.0);


2

On the top of my head, the best way to do that would be using framebuffers. You do your rendering on a larger FBO (FBO Documentation) than your screen resolution, then you downsample your FBO to another framebuffer that fit the size of the screen using a pixel shader. This is OpenGL-specific, so you should be able to do it on SDL. The OpenGL wiki has some ...


1

In addition to other answers ... well there can be more options what is wrong wrong matrices you have to be looking at the object actually so you need pointing Z axis of camera towards the object (+Z or -Z ... depends on projection used) if you use perspective then your object must be inside <Znear,Zfar> range you are passing 8 points of cube ...


-3

If not fail me memory, SDL_GL_DEPTH_SIZE has to be the sum of all color channels: using four color channels: SDL_GL_SetAttribute (SDL_GL_DEPTH_SIZE, 32); If you were using 3 color channels would then: SDL_GL_SetAttribute (SDL_GL_DEPTH_SIZE, 24); Already had some problems with it, this might be the problem. Sorry for my english.


1

Outputting fans in a Geometry Shader is very unnatural as you have discovered. You are currently outputting the vertices in fan-order, which is a construct that is completely foreign to GPUs after primitive assembly. Fans are useful as assembler input, but as far as output is concerned the rasterizer only understands the concept of strips. To write this ...


0

The problem is that it is hard to edit, debug and maintain GLSL shaders directly in a string. It's strange that this sentence has been totally ignored by all 'answers' so far, while the recurring theme of those answers has been, "You can't solve the problem; just deal with it." The answer to making them easier to edit, while loading them directly ...


0

To scale an object, you simply have to multiply each vertex by your scaling factor. A scaling factor of 1.0 will do nothing while a scaling factor of 2.0 will double de position of each vertex, hence scaling it AND probably translating it. If you want the object to stay in place, you'll have to first translate it to your object's center, scale, then ...


-1

I was able to find this Sobel Filter for creating a normal map from a displacement map. It isn't perfect as I still have to slew normals around the sphere, but it is pretty good. vec4 GenerateNormal(int imgWid, int imgHei, GLuint *displacementMap, int texX, int texY) { float normalStrength = 8; int xCoord = texX;// (int)(texX*(float)imgWid); int ...


0

Generally you only want to call OpenGL functions from the display callback. Modify keyPressed to increment a variable & call glutPostRedisplay() and dibujarCubo to use that variable as a glRotatef() parameter.


0

Try calling dibujarCubo() again below glRotatef() instruction


3

You have a type mismatch in your program. In this declaration: glVertexAttribPointer(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, (void*)0); you are saying to OpenGL to interpret your data as float, but your coordinates points are declared double. I suggest you to change GLdouble to GLfloat at coordinate type declaration. By the way, with those points you will not get ...


1

It seems the problem is in setting the matrix uniform. OpenGL is a state machine and doesn't remember uniform values. More importantly, glUniformMatrix4 must be called while the shader is in use. Currently, the matrix is set only at initialization (in the Game constructor), when it needs to be in render(). Shader.Object.bind(); ...


0

It seems like your camera is located inside the box so the face gets culled. Try pushing the box to a more distant z position.


0

Depending on which version of GLUT you are using there might be a function glutMainLoopEvent(), this will cause the rendering to render one frame and then continue from the point where it was called. I think this function might only exist in FreeGLUT though.


0

It looks like your matrix is row major. You need to transpose it before sending it to the shader. Note that there is a boolean parameter called transpose in glUniformMatrix4f but you can't use it in opengl es - the doc says it has to be false - you have to transpose it yourself.


0

You can always abstract this issue to your set of shapes. If each of your shapes that you are drawing is a single object you can easily do this. You can create a shape class which stores a set of points and sets up your VBO, this class can then contain a render() method. You shape class can store a GLenum drawMode which is then a handle to the draw mode ...


2

Look at the docs for gluLookAt(). What you want to do is exactly what this function does. gluLookat creates the View matrix, so it should be: glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW); glLoadIdentity(); gluLookAt(eyeX, eyeY, eyeZ, centerX, centerY, centerZ, upX, upY, upZ); The projection matrix sets the clipping planes: glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION); glLoadIdentity(); ...


2

You can't avoid this, this is a rasterization rule and later a filtering rule (rounding of UVs from fragment coordinates), what people usually do in these cases is apply a dilatation on the texture only for the blue pixels, which means copying the nearest colored pixel for every blue pixel that stands near enough a colored zone.


0

Transform feedback stores primitives. For each primitive that you render in an glBeginTransformFeedback/glEndTransformFeedback block, it will write each vertex in it to the bound feedback buffer in sequential order. It has no concept of indices, and primitives generated from more advanced draw modes (GL_LINE_STRIP, GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, etc.) are split up into ...


0

You need to draw twice. The first one with a GL_TRIANGLES primitive and the second one with GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP primitive. Something like this: glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, first, count); // do any atualization in Uniforms, if necessary to update transformations // and do it again glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP, first, count);


0

I don't know if it helps you now but i had the same problem. after installing glew with homebrew I included the header file #include <GL/glew.h> in my main.cpp after that, in the proyect configuration -> build settings -> search paths -> library search paths i added this path: /usr/local/Cellar/glew/1.11.0/lib and in the same page, ...


2

Float colors have to be in range of [0,1] and you only add something to your values and never reset it to zero, so it becomes greater than 1 in first 10 frames (=very fast), OpenGL clamps it to 1, so you see it white. I.e. that bunch of ifs in changeSize should actually be in renderScene.


0

This warning is emitted by the MSVC++ linker when a library using a different C runtime than your main executable uses is linked into your executable. It can also happen if libraries with different C runtime libraries are linked. In general this doesn't pose a showstopper problem, but if it breaks, it usually breaks in spectacular ways. The usual solution ...


0

There are a few things that looks off: The second vertex coordinate is wrong. It must be normalized in [-1,1 ] range. Either you do that when you create the array or you do transformation in your vertex shader It appears that you don't have a shader You are drawing only one point, the first one. I recommend going through this tutorial series, it is an ...


0

When it comes to matrix multiplication, I believe that coding without a naming convention is a bit like fishing in the dark. Here's how I would choose the variable names: ngl::scene::Mesh* mesh_cam = helicopter->GetMesh("Bellycam"); nglVec4 ptHeliTCamPos = nglVec4(mesh_cam->GetPositionLocal(), 1.0f); nglMat4 matWorldTHeli = ...


0

The problem with different speed is related to the way you are handling the time. The variable 'time' will contain the total time since the program start when you calculate the rotation angle. glRotatef(speed*(float)time, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f); This means that the speed difference is applied not just to the current frame but all previous frames since the ...


0

Keep track of the color your self. For example you have 4 floats holding one component each: GLfloat r,g,b,a; Whenever you want to change the alpha value, set a to desired value and call glColor4f a = 0.5f; glColor4f(r,g,b,a); You can use this exact same solution to change other components individually too


2

It is better to combine the tiles together to form one big texture atlas. Assuming that you use 32x32 pixel tiles, a 2k texture can hold up to 4096 different tiles, potentially way more than enough for a game. The reason is that you can bind this texture once and do (almost) all rendering with it, avoiding the expensive texture switching operation. Do not ...


3

Creating a new context is a fairly heavy weight operation, at least compared to most other things you would do when you use OpenGL. So unless you have a good reason why you need a new context, I would avoid it. Re-allocating the PBOs and objects is easy enough. As you already pointed out, you'll end up doing this in either case. If that alone is enough, I ...


0

It's fine to use normal tuples to store & manipulate coordinates, but you might find the named tuple a more convenient data structure. The elements of a named tuple can be accessed by name or by index, and as a named tuple is a class you can add custom methods to it. Here's a short demo that adds vector addition and subtraction methods to a 2-element ...


-1

This is more of a workaround than an answer. I found that by converting the corrupt image into a jpeg and then downgrading the quality slightly, then converted to a mipmapped DDS, seems to fix the problem.


0

In this function: def vec_add((x1, y1), (x2, y2)): return (x1 + x2, y1 + y2) Python does not support deconstruction in function argument lists. So you can write it like the following: def vec_add(p1, p2): return (p1[0] + p2[0], p1[1] + p2[1]) This is compatible with your existing call to vec_add.


0

I figured it out. I was using GL.Ortho correctly, I just wasn't resetting a value correctly in one of my loops.


2

If you want to transpose/rotate/scale an arbitrary object the template for this is something like this: save your current world matrix (you can do that using glPushMatrix) translate you object to the position you want (using glRotate/glTranslate/glScale) draw you object (the glBegin/glEnd part) retrieve your old matrix (if you pushed it to the stack use ...



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