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You can combine the 6 sides of the skybox into a single texture any way you want. All you need to do is set the texture coordinates of each side of the skybox to the coresponding section of the image. If you make you skybox image TopBottomLeftRightFrontBack all in a row (6:1 aspect ratio) then all you need to do is set the top face as {0.0,0.0} ...


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You are correct, key operations is being called in the wrong place. Where it is now is called once then never again. It needs to go in your update code where you update the rotation of the planet. That way it is called at least once per frame.


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I ran your code under gDebugger, and it made it plain: GL.matrixMode $= GL.Projection GL.loadIdentity GL.ortho2D 0 (realToFrac w) (realToFrac h) 0 This leftover piece of code was triggering an error state: Error-Code: GL_INVALID_OPERATION Error-Description: The specified operation is not allowed in the current state. The offending function is ...


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Workin' fine here: #include <GL/glew.h> #include <GL/freeglut.h> #include <iostream> #include <cstdarg> struct Program { static GLuint Load( const char* shader, ... ) { GLuint prog = glCreateProgram(); va_list args; va_start( args, shader ); while( shader ) { const ...


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The alpha function discards fragments based on their alpha. It's part of the fixed pipeline. In the programmable pipeline you'd just compare your alpha as appropriate and call discard if necessary. Alternatively, if you prefer and your blend mode is suitable, just push the alpha down to 0.0. If you're not using the programmable pipeline then you should use ...


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I've run into issues (failed renders) in WebGL when changing FBO attachments (i.e. from Float to 8 bit or changing configuration by dropping/adding a depth buffer). So in this case I'd recommend separate FBOs. However, I'm pretty sure these were bugs in the implementation. I don't really see any significant performance difference with regular desktop GL, ...


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For Future reference, the issue was here: GL.Enable(EnableCap.Texture2D); videoTexture5 = TexUtil.CreateTextureFromBitmap(cam); GL.BindTexture(TextureTarget.Texture2D, videoTexture5); GL.Begin(BeginMode.Quads); I was not deleting the textures from the video memory. This then caused the video memory to fill up with the video ...


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I don't think you want to call gl-free-array. You are not using VBOs, so OpenGL needs the CPU-side memory to render the triangles. You should put the triangle array in a global variable.


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You are trying to use OpenGL window hints for anti-aliasing but this only works when you create a window with a OpenGL context, which would disable all SDL renderering. The SDL2/SDL2_gfxPrimitives.h library you are using to draw a filled ellipse has several anti-aliasing functions but not for a filled eclipse, a work around could be to draw a not filled ...


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It is normal that your lightning gets darkers when you combine Decay + Diffuse. As they are not 1.0 (but some value between 0.0,1.0) if you multiply both you get a darker result. You should increase the strength of the light. You can do lightStrength / (ConstantDecay + distance*LinearDecay + distance*distance*CuadraticDecay). It would give you a softer ...


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You really can't draw in the core profile without having a VAO, vertex data in a VBO, etc. And a shader program, of course. Well, technically speaking, you can draw without VAO/VBO by hardwiring vertices in the vertex shader code. But that's really not very practical, IMHO. If you frequently have the need to draw a few lines for debugging, I would write a ...


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As long as the ellipsoid is axis-aligned, it's not much more difficult than the sphere. The code you have calculates vertices on a unit sphere. For a sphere with radius r, you multiply those unit sphere points (vx, vy, vz) with the radius: sx = r * vx sy = r * vy sz = r * vz The ellipsoid is a generalization, where the radii in the 3 coordinate directions ...


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OpenGL on Mac OS X is single-thread safe; to enable it: #include <OpenGL/OpenGL.h> CGLError err = 0; CGLContextObj ctx = CGLGetCurrentContext(); // Enable the multi-threading err = CGLEnable( ctx, kCGLCEMPEngine); if (err != kCGLNoError ) { // Multi-threaded execution is possibly not available // Insert your code to take appropriate ...


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The amount of raw space depends on a number of things. What is the color model? What is the data type of the sample model? Using an image type of TYPE_4BYTE_ABGR would lead to a minimum size of 256MB (8K * 8K * 4). Using a data type of int (instead of byte) could increase that 4x. And this is just the first line of reading into a BufferedImage.


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So basically you would like to have a ball that is bouncing from the edges of your window. (For this answer I will ignore the slider, finding collision with the slider is very similar to finding collision with the walls). templx and temply pair is position of your ball. I don't know what is the 3rd argument of DrawCircle function so I will assume that it is ...


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Disclaimer: This is new territory for me, but since no one else seems to be answering, I will make an attempt since this question seems kind of interesting to me. I haven't thoroughly tested these code modifications, so there may be bugs/side-effects I am unaware of. Use at your own risk. :-) The org.newdawn.slick.Font implementation classes (and ...


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I don't think you can nest an interior "anti-scissor" region inside a scissor region. So you cannot, as far as I know, use the basic Libgdx/OpenGL primitives to accomplish this. You can accomplish something similar by re-drawing the inner-most "------" region after drawing your actors (the "***" stuff). Alternatively, you can probably use a Stencil Buffer ...


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The simple way is just commenting the two lines of codes. Then you can get the glui32.lib file after building the solution. It works for me.


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glVertexAttribDivisor() is not a necessity for instancing. It adds the possibility to advance vertex attributes per instance. Without it, all attributes will advance per vertex as usual. This means that you will get the same vertex attribute values for all instances in your vertex shader. Everything you want to do differently per instance has to key off the ...


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Your GL implementation might support the ARB_instanced_arrays extension instead.


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The OpenGL Core Profile requires the use of Vertex Array Objects (VAOs). This is in the "Deprecated and Removed Features" of the spec: Client vertex and index arrays - all vertex array attribute and element array index pointers must refer to buffer objects. The default vertex array object (the name zero) is also deprecated. Calling VertexAttribPointer ...


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I FIGURED IT OUT. Basically... rotating an ortho matrix, as entertaining as that is, is not the correct method. The correct method looks more like this: Matrix4 view = Matrix4.LookAt(new Vector3(0, 0, 0), new Vector3(0, 1, 0), new Vector3(0, 0, -1)); ortho = view * Matrix4.CreateOrthographicOffCenter(-500f / side_zoom + ...


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I found the solution to the problem using this site here. The issue is that I was not using device coordinates as said in the link. Instead I was Using the cartesian coordinate system. The fix. FloatBuffer vertexBufferVAO = BufferUtils.createFloatBuffer(9); **vertexBufferVAO.put(new float[]{{-0.95f,-0.95f,0, -0.5f,-0.95f,0, -0.95f,-0.5f,0}); ...


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MFC is doing nothing. Why do you think it is? MFC is simply a C++ wrapper around the Win32 API. You might ask what the Win32 API is doing. But, are you trying to paint in WM_CREATE (OnCreate() in MFC)? I want to ask, why? Normally, views are created invisible and then made visible. Drawing in an invisible window does nothing useful. When a part of a ...


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I am not an objective c expert, but I have tooled around with it a little bit. I seem to recall that if you use automatic reference counting but you have left some release statements in your code, it can cause objects to be de-allocated unexpectedly.


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I found the answer scouring through examples, so I'll post it just in case anyone else is having similar problems. the draw function needs to be added after each window, in the style of // window one glutInitWindowPosition(50, 50); WindowOne = glutCreateWindow("orthogonal projection"); glutDisplayFunc(drawWindowOne); // window two ...


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I just found the solution: run your program with --graphicssystem native. Or if you can alter the sources you can use QApplication::setGraphicsSystem("native");.


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You could use the distance formula to conclude whether the mouse is touching the ball. Convert the click location from window coordinates to world coordinates. Calculate the distance between the center of the ball and the mouse. If the distance is less than the balls radius, the mouse is touching. Converting mouse position from window to world ...


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As i understand your explanation when snake is moving you compare two squares: square of new head and food. So to get it work correctly you should detect collisions of squares and not full equality. bool rectHitTest(const Square head, const Square food){ if ((head.x2 < food.x1 || head.y2 < food.y1) || (head.x1 > food.x2 || head.y1 > ...


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Kd x lightColour is a component-wise multiplication: a d a*d [ b ] x [ e ] = [ b*e ] c f c*f In the formula for specular illumination (assuming you are talking about the phong or blinn-phong illumination model), there is no power operation on vectors. specular = ks x lightcolor x (R · V)^a The result of R · V is a float, ...


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My current best guess is to subclass QWindow to handle events and possibly install an application event filter. QWindow only works on X11 with native child widgets right now If you're using QGL, try testing QOpenGL as QGL is deprecated and may be an issue. QWidget::effectiveWinId() is preferred even though you are creating an immediate child window. Bug ...


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You need to create a QWidnow, initialize it and integrate into application with QWidget::createWindowContainer class MyNativeWindow : QWindow { MyNativeWindow() : QWindow { setSurfaceType(QWindow::OpenGLSurface); } }; MyNativeWindow *nativeW = new MyNativeWindow(); QWidget *w = QWidget::createWindowContainer( nativeW ); // Use w as a simple ...


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I try out some other methods for implementation.I directly convert quaternions to X Y Z axis angles. I hope it will be useful for others also: float q0 = q0Buffer.at(i); float q1 = q1Buffer.at(i); float q2 = q2Buffer.at(i); float q3 = q3Buffer.at(i); float angle_rad = acos(q0) * 2; float angle_deg = angle_rad * 180 / PI; float x ...


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Ok, so after a lot of reading and some experiments i figured it out! In the DesktopLauncher class that libGDX is using, the programmer is asked to create a config object for the lwjgl init process. Something like this: public static void main(String[] args) { LwjglApplicationConfiguration config = new LwjglApplicationConfiguration(); config.width ...


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The TextureUnit is a local shader id and the TextureObject is a global texture id. I wasn't binding my TextureObject again before setting the active texture, so it was just using the latest one bound.


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Display#isActive Returns: true if window is active, that is, the foreground display of the operating system. Or if you are using LWJGL 3 and GLFW the equivalent is glfwGetWindowAttrib with GLFW_FOCUSED.


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The most portable and framework agnostic method is to use the platform specific WSI functions to query the drawable and OpenGL context. Using a few typedefs you can make portable wrappers which you can then use to query the context and drawable. #if defined(_WIN32) typedef HGLRC GLContext; typedef HDC GLDrawable; typedef HWND GLWindow; GLContext ...


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Use glfwWindowHint for the ContextAttribs: glfwWindowHint(GLFW_CONTEXT_VERSION_MAJOR, 3); glfwWindowHint(GLFW_CONTEXT_VERSION_MINOR, 2); glfwWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_PROFILE, GLFW_OPENGL_CORE_PROFILE); glfwWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_FORWARD_COMPAT, GL_TRUE); Then glfwCreateWindow(width, height, title, 0, 0) glfwWindowHint can also change the options found in ...


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better pre-resize vector and use iterator to sweep through it something like this: std::vector <GLfloat> vertices; vertices.resize(count * 3); ... std::vector <GLfloat>::iterator v = vertices.begin(); for( U32 r = 0; r < m_prec/2; ++r ) //широта { float const theta1 = -F_PI_BY_TWO + pi2p * r; float const theta2 = ...


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you ended list but never started it - that was error.. probably someone had in mind to create display list this can be improved by using glDrawArrays and generate array of vertices, texture cords and indices


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I don't know D so I will only comment on your assimp usage. How about using more preprocessing options: aiProcess_SortByPType | aiProcess_RemoveRedundantMaterials | aiProcess_PreTransformVertices | aiProcess_GenUVCoords | aiProcess_OptimizeMeshes | aiProcess_OptimizeGraph This may be not as useful with .obj files, but will become later if you want to ...


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The fixed-function alpha test (GL_ALPHA_TEST) you are trying to duplicate was a per-fragment test. It used to occur after the fragment shader finished, and you can implement it yourself using discard. However, your current solution is using the interpolated per-vertex alpha value, and that has nothing to do with the texture you are trying to use as a mask. ...


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There are plenty of options for using libraries on Linux. It's usually fairly easy, but you seem to have stumbled on some of the common gotchas. Rule #1: Don't touch /usr or /usr/local yourself. The /usr directory is for packages installed by the system (e.g. apt-get on Debian, Ubuntu, or Mint), so you should almost never touch it at all. The /usr/local ...


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In order to add a new library, you should copy the files inside lib and include directories to the appropriate places in usr folder. Otherwise compiler cannot find where your library is. I'm not sure directory name but it should be placed inside these folders : for headers : usr/local/include for libs : usr/local/lib


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What you're looking to do is called volume rendering. There are various techniques to achieve it, and ultimately it depends on what you want it to look like. There is no simple way to do this either. You can't just draw 3d pixels. You can draw using GL_POINTS and have each transformed point raster to 1 pixel, but this is probably completely unsatisfactory ...


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with camera.unproject(Vector3); you can translate screen coordinates to game world coordinates. Vector3 tmpCoords = new Vector3(Gdx.input.getX(), Gdx.input.getY(), 0); camera.unproject(tmpCoords); tmpCoords.x //is now the touched X coordinate in the game world coordinate system tmpCoords.y //is now the touched Y coordinate in the game world coordinate ...


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This function draws a solid cube using the old fixed function pipeline, modify it for your needs. I've written the variable declarations inside the function for brevity but you should move them out of the function if you want more performance. I would also recommend rewriting the function to use GL.DrawElements() instead. private void DrawBox(float ...


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your render() method is a bit weird. I don't know whether this contributes to the crazy cpu timings the following code is unnecessary because LibGDX itself handles the 16.6ms wait time (for 60Hz) itself. It might make some troubles if your timer doesn't match LibGDX timer. Therefore you might wait too long and thus reducing cpu load significantly. When ...


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It looks like the size you're passing to glBufferData() is much bigger than the actual size of the data. For example in this one: std::vector<float> vertex[MAX_VBO]; ... glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, vertex[vboPosition].size() * sizeof(float)*4, &vertex[vboPosition][0], GL_STATIC_DRAW); Since vertex[vboPosition] is an vector ...


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You have several options: Store your data in vertex buffer object and specify the vertex attribute format in vertex array. Store your data in an 1D texture. But this way is subject to the texture size limit depending on your graphics card. Check it using glGetInteger(GL_MAX_TEXTURE_SIZE, &size); My GT750M returns 16384 (in texels) If you want to store ...



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