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78

JVM The Java Virtual machine (JVM) is the virtual machine that run the Java bytecodes. The JVM doesn't understand Java typo, that's why you compile your *.java files to obtain *.class files that contain the bytecodes understandable by the JVM. It's also the entity that allows Java to be a "portable language" (write once, run anywhere). Indeed there are ...


63

Use http://hg.openjdk.java.net/ as duncan suggested. The Mercurial interface there is quite confusing if you are not used to it, and since this is a large project, it can be hard to find what you are looking for. Here is an example: To find the JDK6 implementation java.util.List, select "jdk6", "jdk", select browse. Then browse to ...


61

This happens because Oracle dropped support for Windows XP (which doesn't have RegDeleteKeyExA used by the installer in its ADVAPI32.DLL by the way) as described in http://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/openjfx-dev/2013-July/009005.html. Yet while the official support for XP has ended, the Java binaries are still (as of Java 8u20 EA b05 at least) ...


60

What finally worked for me (grails now works smoothly) is doing almost like Steve B. has pointed out: JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/default-java This way if the user changes the default JDK for the system, JAVA_HOME still works. default-java is a symlink to the current JVM. Thanks Steve


42

In debug mode in eclipse by default, break on uncaught exceptions is checked. Since you don't have a catch method here, it's likely that an uncaught exception is being thrown and the debugger is breaking for you immediately before the exception is thrown. You can turn it off in preferences under Java->Debug.


33

Nothing crucial. The openjdk project is mostly based on hotspot source code donated by Sun. Moreover, openjdk was selected to be the reference implementation for java 7, and is maintained by Oracle engineers. There's a more detailed answer to your question here, which links to this blog post: Q: What is the difference between the source code found in ...


30

You may find OpenJDK 6 and 7 binaries for Windows in openjdk-unofficial-builds github project. Disclaimer: I've built them myself


22

If you use alternatives you can set the JAVA_HOME based on the symlinked javac like this: JAVA_HOME=$(readlink -f /usr/bin/javac | sed "s:bin/javac::")


21

JVM is Java Virtual Machine -- the JVM actually runs Java bytecode. JDK is Java Developer Kit -- the JDK is what you need to compile Java source code JRE is Java Runtime Environment -- is what you need to run a java program -- it contains a JVM, among other things. OpenJDK is a specific JDK implementation.


20

In order for it to make any sense it has to be combined with an understanding of how HashMap allocates things in to buckets. This is the trivial function by which a bucket index is chosen: static int indexFor(int h, int length) { return h & (length-1); } So you can see, that with a default table size of 16, only the 4 least significant bits of ...


20

Open $HOME/.openproj/run.conf and Change JAVA_OPTS="-Xms128m -Xmx768m" To JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.vendor=Sun -Xms128m -Xmx768m" then run it, It will work fine.


18

Technical differences are a consequence of the goal of each one (OpenJDK is meant to be the reference implementation, open to the community, while Oracle is meant to be a commercial one) They both have "almost" the same code of the classes in the Java API; but the code for the virtual machine itself is actually different, and when it comes to libraries, ...


17

I'm using JDK for working on Android and it's fine :) java -version java version "1.6.0_20" OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.9.1) (6b20-1.9.1-1ubuntu3) OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 17.0-b16, mixed mode) And eclipse plugin too :)


16

A Java virtual machine (JVM) is a virtual machine that can execute Java bytecode. It is the code execution component of the Java software platform. The Java Development Kit (JDK) is an Oracle Corporation product aimed at Java developers. Since the introduction of Java, it has been by far the most widely used Java Software Development Kit (SDK). Java ...


15

In your project's preferences, you must set the compiler --source option to 1.7 and --target option to 1.7 also. There are dedicated option boxes for that. Right-click on the project. Choose Properties. Choose Java Compiler on the left. Choose 1.7 for the Compiler Compliance level. If the 2 drop-downs below that aren't 1.7, uncheck Use default ...


14

Assuming you installed the OpenJDK6 with: sudo apt-get install openjdk-6-jdk In Ubuntu 64 bit, make sure the paths are valid for your installation (change if using 32bit version): /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk-amd64/jre/bin/java /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk-amd64/bin/javac Setup update-alternatives: sudo update-alternatives --install "/usr/bin/java" ...


14

JavaFX is part of OpenJDK The JavaFX project itself is open source and is part of the OpenJDK project. You can build an open version of OpenJDK (including JavaFX) completely from source which has no dependencies on the Oracle JDK or closed source code. There are currently no Linux distributions that already offer an OpenJFX package so users wouldn't have ...


13

JFrame jFrame = new JFrame("Test"); jFrame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE); //jFrame.setLocationRelativeTo(null); jFrame.setSize(600, 600); jFrame.pack(); jFrame.setVisible(true); jFrame.setLocationRelativeTo(null); //To center the code This will correct the problem and center the Jframe


13

It looks like there is no sign of Nashorn on OpenJDK yet. The most recent comment from Jim Laskey in Oct 2012 suggests Q4 2012: https://blogs.oracle.com/nashorn/entry/welcome_to_the_nashorn_blog#comment-1351205506968 I think it is time for a nashorn tag on SO! Update Dec 1 2012: Looks like late Dec 2012 OpenJDK may have it ...


13

Take a look here. I remember having the same problem when running IDEA, but after adding the line mentioned in the wiki the problem goes away. export _JAVA_OPTIONS='-Dawt.useSystemAAFontSettings=setting' where setting may be off or false or default – No anti-aliasing on – Full anti-aliasing gasp – Use the font's built-in hinting instructions lcd or ...


13

There is also an alternate solution for those who aren't afraid of using hex editors (e.g. XVI32) [thanks to Trevor for this]: in the installer executable (jdk-8uXX-windows-i586.exe in case of JDK) simply replace all occurrences of RegDeleteKeyExA (the name of API found in "new" ADVAPI32.DLL) with RegDeleteKeyA (legacy API name), followed by two hex '00's ...


12

I'm going to respond to my own question here to synthesize all my findings and the answers by @Agemen and @Kowser above. OpenJDK is a reference implementation and does not change unless the spec changes There is an OpenJDK update project which implements all updates in source (http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk7u/, source ...


12

No, not at all. It is just a different syntax for the same thing. It gets compiled into exactly the same piece of bytecode. So say it like a human: you are telling the compiler twice exactly the same thing what to do, in two different ways. javap proves it. Here is with the this.: { Prog(int); flags: Code: stack=2, locals=2, args_size=2 ...


11

The parallel of a bezier curve is quite ugly from a mathematical point of view. What is easy to do is compute a widening from a polygonal approximation of the bezier (that is you compute line segments from the bezier and then move the points along the normals on the two sides of the curve). This gives good results if your thickness isn't too big compared ...


11

You can simply download tar.gz archive from Maven web-site and unpack it to some directory like this (will unpack it to /opt): tar -xzvf apache-maven-3.0.4-bin.tar.gz -C /opt After it you need to set $M2_HOME variable: export M2_HOME=<path_to_maven> And add it to PATH: export PATH=$PATH:$M2_HOME/bin To check you can launch: mvn -version


11

Get the source of the JavaDoc from the OpenJDK, and build your own JAR from it with all the relevant JavaDoc classes. Write a maven plugin that relies on your JAR, and call com.sun.tools.javadoc.Main.main from it. It does not look like you need to open up your sources when using OpenJDK's classes, you should be OK to distribute the resultant plug-in without ...


10

It is unlikely that anything will go wrong with OpenJDK. It is considered 100% compatible by now. But I think it is good to know what parts had to be rewritten and therefore are not using the same code as the SunJDK. The Wikipedia entry has a good overview of this: As of May 2008, the only part of the Class library that remains proprietary and ...


10

OpenJDK is the reference implementation of Java as of version 7. OpenJDK 7 is the starting point for the version that Oracle distributes as Oracle JDK. Other vendors (e.g. RedHat for IcedTea) may also use OpenJDK as their starting point. In terms of the differences between OpenJDK and a vendor VM, there may be patches which a vendor wants to apply but ...


10

You need to recompile the OSGi source code with javac from Java 7. OSGi compiled the code with Java 6 javac using -target jsr14. Java 7 javac removed support for compiling against such class files: http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=7078419 Starting with R5, OSGi will no longer ship -target jsr14 class files. [Updated 31 Oct 2012] OSGi has ...


10

You just have to put $JAVA_HOME/bin in your $PATH variable.



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