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12

I just recently attacked this problem and have scripted the process of getting everything working based on the official instructions. The script will download everything into ~/code for easy maintenance and will append the correct environment variables to your ~/.profile file. For advanced users, pick a nice location you want the lib, bin and include ...


9

Analysis First, it is pure luck that your program seems to work like this. You do indeed have a data race, that causes invalid results on my machine. Consider the following test harness for this post: ::std::cout << ::xtd::target_info() << "\n\n"; // [target os] [target architecture] with [compiler] static const int count = 30000; auto gen = ...


7

Your problem is due to a race condition on the inner loop variable j. It needs to be made private. For C89 I would do something like this: #pragma omp parallel { int i, j, k; #pragma omp for for(i=0; ... For C++ or C99 use mixed declarations #pragma omp parallel for for(int i=0; ... Doing this you don't have to explicitly declare ...


7

If you never intend to scale your application beyond a single shared-memory node, then OpenMP parallelisation might be relatively easier to implement in comparison to MPI parallelisation. Relatively, because the apparent simplicity of OpenMP is very misleading. In order to utilise the full ability of modern shared-memory machines, one should maximise data ...


7

The reason your code gets the wrong result is you have the syntax in your assembly backwards. You're using Intel syntax in which the destination should come before the source. So in your original .asm code you should change vaddpd ymm0, ymm2, ymm3 to vaddpd ymm3, ymm2, ymm0 One way to see this is to use intrinsics and then look at the disassembly. ...


6

The problem is likely due to the clock() function. It does not return the wall time on Linux. You should use the function omp_get_wtime(). It's more accurate than clock and works on GCC, ICC, and MSVC. In fact I use it for timing code even when I'm not using OpenMP. I tested your code with it here http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/26f4e8c9fdae5cc2 ...


6

Ensure that gap is a shared variable and enclose it in an OpenMP single directive, something like #pragma omp single { gap = (DEFAULT_HEIGHT / nthreads); } Only one thread will execute the code enclosed in the single directive, the other threads will wait at the end of the enclosed block of code. An alternative would be to make gap private and let ...


6

You don't need to implement a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code if it is only for sharing a chunk of data. What you actually have to do is: 1) Split the world communicator into groups that span the same host/node. That is really easy if your MPI library implements MPI-3.0 - all you need to do is call MPI_COMM_SPLIT_TYPE with split_type set to MPI_COMM_TYPE_SHARED: ...


6

There's a few things going on here, that come down to: You have to work fairly hard to get every last bit of performance out of the memory subsystem; and Different benchmarks measure different things. The first helps explain why you need multiple threads to saturate the available memory bandwidth. There is a lot of concurrency in the memory system, and ...


6

The sparse matrix vector multiplication is memory bound (see here) and it could be shown with a simple roofline model. Memory bound problems benefit from higher memory bandwidth of multisocket NUMA systems but only if the data initialisation is done in such a way that the data is distributed among the two NUMA domains. I have some reasons to believe that you ...


5

Try running the IPCM (Intel Performance Counter Monitor). You can watch memory bandwidth, and see if it maxes out with more cores. My gut feeling is that you are memory bandwidth limited. As a quick back of the envelope calculation, I find that uncached read bandwidth is about 10 GB/s on a Xeon. If your clock is 2.5 GHz, that's one 32 bit word per clock ...


5

C11 _Generic is not a direct solution, but it does allow you to achieve the desired result if you are patient to code all types as in: #define typename(x) _Generic((x), \ int: "int", \ float: "float", \ default: "other") int i; float f; void* v; assert(strcmp(typename(i), "int") == 0); assert(strcmp(typename(f), "float") == 0); ...


5

With your current approach and data structures you're going to struggle to get good speedup with OpenMP. Consider the loop nest !$omp parallel do private(i, j) shared(bodyArray, n) default(none) do i = 1, n do j = i, n if ( i /= j .and. j > i) then bodyArray(i)%acc = bodyArray(i)%acc + bodyArray(i)%accTo(bodyArray(j)) ...


5

You could do something like this: start_critical.h: #ifdef MYCOND #pragma omp critical{ #endif end_critical.h #ifdef MYCOND } #endif And then use it like this: #include "start_critical.h" //sometimes critical code here #include "end_critical.h" Since there are no header guards in start_critical.h or end_critical.h you can use them as many times as ...


5

As Michael Dussere points out, you're getting 64 as an answer because your implementation is only launching 64 threads. It may be using an internal default value to limit the max number of threads (try varying the environment variable OMP_THREAD_LIMIT, or calling omp_get_thread_limit() to see if that is the case.) The reason for such a limit is that ...


5

Packing You appear to be packing the block of the A matrix too often. You do rpack(locA, A + ii*n + kk, kc, mc, mr, n); But this only depends on ii and kk and not on jj but it's inside the inner loop on jj so you repack the same thing for each iteration of jj. I don't think that's necessary. In my code I do the packing before the matrix ...


5

On the one side, the OpenMP specification intentionally omits any specifications concerning interoperability with other programming paradigms and any mixing of C++11 threading with OpenMP is non-standard and vendor-specific. On the other side, compilers (at least GCC) tend to use the same underlying TLS mechanism to implement OpenMP's #pragma omp ...


5

Enabling OpenMP inhibits certain compiler optimisations, e.g. it could prevent loops from being vectorised or shared variables from being kept in registers. Therefore OpenMP-enabled code is usually slower than the serial and one has to utilise the available parallelism to offset this. That being said, your code contains a parallel region nested inside the ...


5

Your code contains a race condition. The conflicting statements are the assignment a[i+1] = b[i]; that writes to the array a and the statement totalA += a[i]; that reads from a. In your code there is no guarantee that the iteration that is responsible for writing to a particular location in the array is executed before the iteration that reads from that ...


4

You probably don't use any compiler optimizations. Enable them by -O2 -O3, -O5 or -Ofast. You will see that the program takes 0 seconds because the compiler optimizes everything out. You also have a race condition, more threads are writing in the same l. Thus the program is invalid, l should be private. It also leads to a slowdown because the threads ...


4

The value in using a distributed-memory programming model like MPI or Charm++ even on nominally uniform shared-memory hardware is that it engenders a much more locality-conscious design of the algorithms and implementation. Even for a single core, memory access costs are non-uniform - assumptions of spatial and temporal locality are baked deeply into the ...


4

There tends to be substantial overheard in thread creation and scheduling. In general you want to give each thread enough work that the overhead from creating a new thread is a absorbed by the "win" of introducing multithreading. Additionally, assuming you have sufficiently many pixels, it's a good idea to make sure each thread accesses pixels ...


4

Your goal is to distribute the data evenly over the available processors. You should split the image up (outer loop) evenly with one thread per processor core. Experiment with fine and coarse grain parallelism to see what gives the best results. Once your number of threads exceed the number of cores available you will start to see performance degradation.


4

Your problem is much simpler than you think and does not involve GIL in any way. You are running in an out-of-bound access to out[] when you access it via ind2 since j easily becomes larger than n. The reason is simply that you have not applied any data sharing clause to your parallel region and all variables except i remain shared (as per default in OpenMP) ...


4

To your exact question: !$ whatever_statement will use that statement only when compiled with OpenMP. Otherwise, in your specific case, can't you just use: !$OMP parallel do schedule(DYNAMIC, 4) reduction(min:min_val) .... min_val = min(min_val, some_expression(i)) .... !$OMP end parallel do result = sqrt(min_val) ? I'm using this normally ...


4

If you are willing to use pre-processed FORTRAN source file, you can always rely on the macro _OPENMP to be defined when using OpenMP. The simplest example is: program pippo #ifdef _OPENMP print *, "OpenMP program" #else print *, "Non-OpenMP program" #endif end program pippo Compiled with: gfortran -fopenmp main.F90 the program will give the ...


4

Abstracting somewhat from your code you seem to want to write something like #pramga omp parallel for for(unsigned int i=0;i<N;i++){ v[i] = foo(i) } but you are concerned that, because the computational effort of calls to foo(i) varies greatly, this simple approach will be poorly balanced if each thread simply gets a range of values of ...


4

There is nothing wrong with OpenMP in your case. What is wrong is the way you measure the elapsed time. Using clock() to measure the performance of multithreaded applications on Linux (and most other Unix-like OSes) is a mistake since it does not return the wall-clock (real) time but instead the accumulated CPU time for all process threads (and on some Unix ...


4

OS provides threads (syscalls to create new threads; scheduling services). Unix libc has wrapper around OS threads with lot useful functions (like mutexes, cond vars, etc). Usually external interface of such system libraries is "POSIX threads" (functions named pthread_*): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/POSIX_Threads Windows has its own hard-to-use threading ...


4

Take a look at the example openssl/crypto/threads/mttest.c in the OpenSSL source code tree. Basically, you have to provide two callback functions: one that implements locking and unlocking and one that returns a unique thread ID. Both are easily implemented using OpenMP: omp_lock_t *locks; // Locking callback void openmp_locking_callback(int mode, ...



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