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10

I suppose you meant to overload operator== with c-style string, then the answer is No. The operator overloading is supposed to be used for customizing operators for operands of user-defined types. From the standard, $13.5/6 Overloaded operators [over.oper] (emphasis mine) An operator function shall either be a non-static member function or be a ...


8

An operator function cannot have default arguments (8.3.6), except where explicitly stated below. (C++14 standard, [over.oper]/8; an identical sentence appears in the C++03 standard). The specific case where default arguments are allowed is the case of the function call operator (operator(); see [over.call]/1). In all other cases they are disallowed.


3

Isn't it already overloaded? #include<iostream> #include<cstring> int main() { std::string a = "Ala"; std::string b = "Ala"; if(a==b) std::cout<<"same\n"; else std::cout<<"but different\n"; } The code above worked for me (CodeBlocks)


3

Of course it doesn't change. You don't change it in your assignment operator. Instead you return a pointer to a new value allocated on the heap...and ignore that result.


2

Using the unaryPlus operator (+Component) is harder in this context since, as the unary implies, it's a single operand operator (single input). There's a sort of hacky solution though: class ExtOf<out T : MarkupContainer>(val self: T) { companion object { private val lastConfiguredContainer = ...


2

Let's look at the subroutine vsum. The work that is done in that subroutine depends on the definition of the components of all three objects ta, tb and tc. For your summation to proceed as you expect it is necessary for all the allocatable components to be allocated and for the match of ta%kn with 'Real32'. There's no complete working example, but as you ...


1

I would change to the following, in order for sequencing of operator<< (e.g., term << "hello" << std::endl; ) to work: namespace foo { class terminal { std::ostream &strm; public: terminal(std::ostream &strm_) : strm(strm_) {} terminal() : strm(std::cout) {} template <typename T> friend std::ostream& ...


1

The problem is that your operator << takes its argument by reference to non-const, which means it can only bind to lvalues. So things like non-string literals are out. If you do not need to modify the argument, take it by const & instead. The language has a special rule which allows lvalue references to const to bind to rvalues as well. ...


1

double *cor=new double[num]; You're declaring a local variable named cor, not initializing the member cor. It should be: cor = new double[num]; However in real code, you would use an unique_ptr to a double array, which deletes the array automatically (with no additional overhead): #include <iostream> #include <memory> // for unique_ptr ...


1

The operator you defined is a prefix operator, so you should call it like this: ++it; If you need the postfix one, declare it as follows: SetIterator<TElement> operator ++ (int);



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