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227

In the expression (i, ++i, 1), the comma used is the comma operator the comma operator (represented by the token ,) is a binary operator that evaluates its first operand and discards the result, and then evaluates the second operand and returns this value (and type). Because it discards its first operand, it is generally only useful where the first ...


175

To be pedantic, the C specification does not specify how addition is implemented. But to be realistic, the + operator on integer types smaller than or equal to the word size of your CPU get translated directly into an addition instruction for the CPU, and larger integer types get translated into multiple addition instructions with some extra bits to handle ...


71

When you add two bits, following is the result: (truth table) a | b | sum (a^b) | carry bit (a&b) (goes to next) --+---+-----------+-------------------------------- 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 0 | 1 | 1 | 0 1 | 0 | 1 | 0 1 | 1 | 0 | 1 So if you do bitwise xor, you can get the sum without carry. And if you do bitwise and you can get ...


61

<=> Spaceship Operator Added in PHP 7 The spaceship operator <=> is the latest comparison operator added in PHP 7. It is a non-associative binary operator with the same precedence as equality operators (==, !=, ===, !==). This operator allows for simpler three-way comparison between left-hand and right-hand operands. The operator results in an ...


55

Quoting from C11, chapter 6.5.17, Comma operator The left operand of a comma operator is evaluated as a void expression; there is a sequence point between its evaluation and that of the right operand. Then the right operand is evaluated; the result has its type and value. So, in your case, (i, ++i, 1) is evaluated as i, gets evaluated as a ...


48

This <=> operator will offer combined comparison in that it will : Return 0 if values on either side are equal Return 1 if value on the left is greater Return -1 if the value on the right is greater The rules used by the combined comparison operator are same as the currently used comparison operators by PHP viz. <, <=, ==, >= and >. ...


48

Just use a variable: var relative = BigObjectThing.Uncle.PreferredInputStream.NthRelative(5); return relative == x || relative == y || relative == z; Or if you want to get fancy with a larger set of things: var relatives = new HashSet<thing>(new[] { x, y, z }); return relatives.Contains(BigObjectThing.Uncle.PreferredInputStream.NthRelative(5));


43

It's a form of tuple unpacking. With parentheses: (plot1,) = ax01.plot(t,yp1,'b-') ax01.plot() returns a tuple containing one element, and this element is assigned to plot1. Without that comma (and possibly the parentheses), plot1 would have been assigned the whole tuple. Observe the difference between a and b in the following example: >>> def ...


42

+ is implemented in java compilers. The compiler replaces String + String with either compile time constants or StringBuilder code. Note that this applies to primitives too. i.e, int i=1+2 could get directly replaced to int i=3 during compilation itself.


32

I would say No because if self.getData() changes something during its operation, then the first statement has the possibility of returning a different result since it will make a 2nd call to it.


30

Here, && acts as a short-circuit operator (see also the code example here). If $autoClean evaluates to true, $this->unsetErrorMessages() will be executed. If $autoClean evaluates to false, $this->unsetErrorMessages() will not be executed. Using || instead of && would reverse this behavior. The same behavior can obviously also be ...


29

i = (i, ++i, 1) + 1; Let's analyse it step by step. (i, // is evaluated but ignored, there are other expressions after comma ++i, // i is updated but the resulting value is ignored too 1) // this value is finally used + 1 // 1 is added to the previous value 1 So we obtain 2. And the final assignment now: i = 2; Whatever was in i before it's ...


26

An extension method would simulate this: public static bool EqualsAny(this Thing thing, params object[] compare) { return compare.Contains(thing); } bool result = BigObjectThing.Uncle.PreferredInputStream.NthRelative(5).EqualsAny(x, y, z); C# doesn't have a default syntax for such an OR-like comparison afaik.


23

You can check with specification. The compiler have the implementation of it, not the Java source code. Java Language Specification- 15.18.1. String Concatenation Operator + An implementation may choose to perform conversion and concatenation in one step to avoid creating and then discarding an intermediate String object. To increase the performance of ...


22

An operator for a conditional expression in Python was added in 2006 as part of Python Enhancement Proposal 308. Its form differ from common ?: operator and it's: <expression1> if <condition> else <expression2> which is equivalent to: if <condition>: <expression1> else: <expression2> Here is example: result = x if a ...


22

Python, should I implement __ne__() operator based on __eq__? Short Answer: No. Instead, define the __ne__ in terms of == instead of the __eq__. E.G. class A: def __eq__(self, other): return self.value == other.value def __ne__(self, other): return not self == other # NOT `return not self.__eq__(other)` See proof that ...


22

Maybe, but only if self.getData() is a pure function and has no side effects. More importantly the object that self.getData() returns must also be free of any side effects and consistently return a boolean value. In the simplest case if f() is defined as: def f(): return ["Hello World!"] Then the following: x = f() if f() else "" is logically ...


22

It's to enable access to properties which would be invalid syntax as bare literals. Meaning: $dbObject->mysql-5.4[0]->credentials This is invalid/ambiguous syntax. To make clear to PHP that mysql-5.4 is a property and not a property minus a float, you need to use the {'..'} syntax. To be exact, ->{..} enables you to use any expression as the ...


21

Javascript execution flow diagram for strict equality / Comparison '===' Javascript execution flow diagram for non strict equality / comparison '=='


20

GCC provides this as an extension. This is not in the C++ standard. The semantics are that if the condition is nonzero, the value of the expression is that of the condition. The implicit requirement is that the condition must be type-compatible with the third operand, i.e. one can be converted to the other following the usual conditional operator rules. ...


20

Seems that this function demonstrates how + actually works in the background No. This is translated to the native add machine instruction, which is actually using the hardware adder, in the ALU. If you're wondering how does the computer add, here is a basic adder. Everything in the computer is done using logic gates, which are mostly made of ...


17

This program has indeterminate behavior: the compiler is not required to evaluate i[0] and i[2] in a left-to-right order (the C++ language gives this freedom to compilers in order to allow for optimizations). For instance, Clang does it in this instance, while GCC does not. The order of evaluation is unspecified, so you cannot expect a consistent output, ...


17

The outcome of (i, ++i, 1) is 1 For (i,++i,1) the evaluation happens such that the , operator discards the evaluated value and will retain just the right most value which is 1 So i = 1 + 1 = 2


16

A simple example is 2 == '2' -> true, values are SAME because of type conversion. 2 === '2' -> false, values are NOT SAME because of no type conversion.


16

Python allows you to put tuples on the left hand side of the assignment. The code in the question is an example of this, it might look like it's a special case of an operator but it's really just a case tuple assignment going on here. Some examples might help: a, b = (1, 2) which gives you a = 1 and b = 2. Now there's the concept of the one element tuple ...


15

These are called Pre and Post Increment / Decrement Operators. x++; is the same as x = x + 1; x--; is the same as x = x - 1; Putting the operator before the variable ++x; means, first increment x by 1, and then use this new value of x int x = 0; int z = ++x; // produce x is 1, z is 1 int x = 0; int z = x++; // produce x is 1, but z is 0 , ...


15

As others have pointed out a collection is one way you could do this. If you wanted to have a little more flexibility than using Contains (which only really lets you test x.Equals(y)), and even support chaining by &= in additon to |=, I'd suggest the Any or All extension methods built into .NET. var compares = new[] { x, y, z }; var relative = ...


15

Because s * 3 is one operation, whereas s + s + s is two operations; it's really (s + s) + s, creating an additional string object that then gets discarded. You can see the difference by using dis to look at the bytecode each generates: s + s + s: 3 0 LOAD_FAST 0 (s) 3 LOAD_FAST 0 (s) ...


15

This is all about operator precedence and their associativity http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.precedence.php or has lower precendence than = that is why it will be executed first so $asdf = 1 OR true ? "asdf" : "fdsa"; will be someting like ($asdf = 1) or true ? :"asdf" : "fdsa" that is why it will print 1. $a or $b check whether $a or $b ...


15

Here, && acts as a short-circuit operator as told by @robby. If you call getErrors(), $autoclean will be true, $this->unsetErrorMessages() will be executed. If you call getErrors(false), $autoclean will be false, $this->unsetErrorMessages() will not be executed. The line provides us a behaviour to prevent default execution of any code and also ...



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