Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Lately the momentum seems to be with the "perf" tool, distributed as part of the kernel source package since 2.6.30 or thereabouts. In some sense it's a bit more convenient than oprofile in that you don't need root access to use it, but unfortunately documentation is lacking. See https://perf.wiki.kernel.org/


5

Check out gprof - it should do what you want.


5

without seeing the code in question is really hard to suggest where the problem lies, but the _fini time suggests destructors for global variables (or static function variables which also exist for the duration of the program). I would suggest - that you inspect the classes of all your global+static variables and see what their destructors are doing - ...


5

Extending another answer, I use the 'callgrind' option of valgrind (http://valgrind.org). Then install kcachegrind from KDE for a nice GUI interface. As a dummy's tutorial, do: 1) Compile your application with debugging information. It's a good idea to try profiling with optimisation both on and off, with optimisation off you will get more information, but ...


5

Glad you asked. I believe OProfile can be made to do what I consider the right thing, which is to take stack samples on wall-clock time when the program is being slow and, if it won't let you examine individual stack samples, at least summarize for each line of code that appears on samples, the percent of samples the line appears on. That is a direct measure ...


5

gprof2dot is the most amazing visualization tool for profile data. opcontrol --shutdown opcontrol --callgraph=7 opcontrol --image=<abs/path/to/your/execuable> opcontrol --start ... time passes ... opcontrol --dump opreport -c > profile_info.txt gprof2dot.py -f oprofile --strip profile_info.txt | dot -Tsvg > profile_graph.svg inkscape ...


4

A bit late to answer this one, but the closest answer is Zoom. Some of the Shark team worked on it.


4

Oprofile takes stack samples. What you need to do is not look at summaries of them, but actually examine the raw samples. If you are spending, say, 30% of time in the kernel, then if you can see 10 stack samples chosen at random, you can expect 3 of them, more or less, to show you the full reason of how you got into the kernel. That way you will see things ...


4

Maynard Johnson explains this warning in a message to a mailinglist: There have been cases reported where samples recorded by the oprofile kernel driver appear to be attributed to the wrong binary, in particular if the sample rate is very high or when doing callgraph profiling (since callgraph profiling, like a high sample rate, also results in ...


3

Actually, there is another choice called perf which is integrated in kernel source. I think it is a better replacement for OProfile. See perf wiki for more details. here


3

Following https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=582570 I was able to get oprofile to run on EC2: opcontrol --deinit modprobe oprofile timer=1 opcontrol --reset opcontrol --no-vmlinux opcontrol --start


3

You can observe voluntary_ctxt_switches and nonvoluntary_ctxt_switches values from the /proc/self/status file.


3

Try Zoom - I believe it will let you profile all processes - it would be interesting to know if it highlights your problem in this case.


3

Look at the KCachegrind - it's a profile data visualization tool. KCachegrind visualize data files generated by Callgrind profiler tool. But with conversion scripts, KCachegrind is able to visualize output of other profilers like OProfile. When you install KCachegrind using a package manager (yum, apt-get, etc.) you get a tool called op2calltree which ...


2

In oprofile when used with option --seperate=kernel, it seperates the kernel and kernel modules per application. --seperate='library' seperates the samples for the dynamically linked object per application basis. kernel, dynamically linked object are just not specific to the application we want to profile alone. But at the same time our application spends ...


2

Unless you have an in circuit emulator or break-out box around your CPU, there's no such thing as timing a single-loop or single-instruction. You need to bulk up your test runs to something that takes at least several seconds each in order to reduce error due to other things going on in the CPU, OS, etc. If you're wanting to find out exactly how much time ...


2

OProfile is a tool that does sampling-based profiling of both your application and the system calls it makes. This allows for seeing detailed information about where it's spending time. It doesn't have a GUI, but there are several front-ends that will let you process the information from the runs. I've used it extensively, both for desktop applications ...


2

When profiling optimized code you really cannot rely on accurate source code lines. The compiler moves stuff around far too much. For an accurate picture you will need to look at the code disassembler output.


2

I think gperftools works well for profiling. The runtime performance penalty for CPU profile data is very small.


2

I know you want to do your profiling on an ARM cortex-A8 but if you're interested in call-graphs, why not compile for x86 and run valgrind's callgrind tool and examine the results with kcachegrind? The call graphs should be the same between the two architectures, even if they compile the functions slightly differently, the relationship between functions ...


2

NMI (Non maskable interrupt) watchdog is a hardware watchdog timer that detects if software has crashed in order to force an automatic hardware reset of the system.


2

oprofile is more accurate; it uses CPU performance monitoring (built in hardware monitoring with 100s of performance events); and google-perftools libprofiler.so uses setitimer - intreval timer of OS kernel: $ nm -D libprofiler.so | grep timer U getitimer U setitimer Interval timer is emulated by OS and it can't be more than HZ, as I know (100 ...


2

Turns out you need to actually kill and restart the oprofile daemon with sudo opcontrol --stop sudo opcontrol --reset sudo opcontrol --shutdown sudo opcontrol --start-daemon sudo opcontrol --start when changing sampled events. Simply stopping and starting the profile isn't enough. Not that this is documented anywhere.


2

I agree with Mike's answer: a callgraph is not the right way to inspect the source of the problem. What you really want is to look at the callchains of the hottest samples. If you don't want to inspect "by hand" the raw samples collected by oprofile, you could rerun your application with the record command of perf using the -g option in order to collect ...


2

If the C_FLAGS during compilation contain the -g parameter, then all the paths of individual source files are included in the .debug_info section in the resulting binary executable. The following command will dump to the console, a complete list of all the paths to various .c source files that are present in the binary built with debug-info. $ readelf ...


1

This failure indicates that a stat of the file in question failed. Do an strace -e stat to see the specific failure mode. time_t op_get_mtime(char const * file) { struct stat st; if (stat(file, &st)) return 0; return st.st_mtime; } ... if (!header.mtime) { // FIXME: header.mtime for JIT sample files is 0. The problem ...


1

I'm not familiar with the named profilers but there are two major approaches to profiling: Instrumentation, this method usually requires recompiling (not always, for example java and .Net applications can be instrumented dynamically). With this method it is possible to measure exactly how often a routine is called, or how many iterations a certain loop ...


1

Check if opcontrol --status does not have Call-graph depth: 0 in its output. If it does, stop profiling, do opcontrol --callgraph=<desired call stack depth>, and restart profiling.


1

Please check in the kernel source code that, in linux/arch/your_machine_architecture/kernel/cputable.c file, whether the .num_pmcs is defined for your machine's architecture. Eg. For PPC970MP architecture, you can find this in linux/arch/powerpc/kernel/cputable.c --> Line No.272(Kernel Version 2.6.32). Because some of the older kernel versions does not have ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible