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You can make use of computeIfAbsent method in Map interface provided in Java 8. final Map<String,AtomicLong> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<>(); map.computeIfAbsent("A", k->new AtomicLong(0)).incrementAndGet(); map.computeIfAbsent("B", k->new AtomicLong(0)).incrementAndGet(); map.computeIfAbsent("A", k->new ...


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I know you said these are lists, but is there any reason to not temporarily convert them to numpy arrays? This can be straight forward (in case you don't know how to do the conversion): s = np.array(s) l = np.array(l) From there, you can make use of the "searchsorted" function. My test run took just under 1.5 s. from __future__ import division, ...


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I found out, that one could do the following as well: x_j \in {1,2,3} for j \in {1,2,3} b_i_j \in {0,1} for i,j \in {1,2,3} \sum_{i=1}^{3} i * b_i_j = x_j for j \in {1,2,3} \sum_{i=1}^{3} b_i_j = 1 for j \in {1,2,3} Well, obviously there is j^2 new binary variables now. But you have your x_j variables as well as your b_i_j variables thus you are much ...


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With the assumption, that you use a classical Branch and Bound MIP-Solver, it will help the solver up to a certain amount, if u supply heuristic solutions (for example by the corresponding callback). Not only one, you can supply even more to the solution pool. The Problem is, that in most cases MIP-Solvers try to prove optimality. Even if the found the ...


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You could divide the problem in z=0 and z>=0. For the second subproblem, you could set up and solve the problem like this: library(lpSolveAPI) # create object lprec <- make.lp(0,3) invisible(lp.control(lprec, sense="max")) # sense defaults to "min" # add objective and constraints set.objfn(lprec, obj=c(150,92,41.1), indices=c(1,2,3)) ...


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There is no "magic" syntax to achieves this. If the class has no virtual table, you could use memset(this, 0, sizeof(* this)), but it is not recommended. You could try to play with offsetof to pinpoint the address of the first member, and erase from there on. This is a bit better than simply memseting the whole thing, but it is still making me ...


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Note how the bar for the load of the page is color coded. First gray, then green, then blue. The gray part is DNS lookups and initiating the request to the server. The green part represents the amount of time it takes the server to start responding to the request. The blue part is the time spent downloading the HTML. @batz's comment may not have been ...



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