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14

Only the X4 column update depends on previous values, so the loop can be mostly 'vectorized' (with a little bit of optimization, avoiding addition of 1 to rind in each iteration) as rind1 <- rind + 1L for (i in seq_len(N)) x$X4[rind1[i]] <- x$X4[rind1[i]] + x$X4[rind[i]] x$X5[rind1] <- x$X4[rind1] * x$X3[rind1] x$X5[rind1] <- ...


10

(This page became the p6doc Performance page.) Dealing with Perl 6 speed issues I don't know why the statement modifier form of if is slower. But I can share things that can help folk deal with Perl 6 speed issues in general so I'll write about those, listed easiest first. (I mean easiest things for users and potential users to do, not easiest for compiler ...


9

You've got an O(n2) algorithm for no obvious reason. It's easy to make this O(n1/2)... Loop from 1 to the square root of n/2 (for variable i) - because when i is greater than sqrt(n/2) then i*i + j*j will be greater than n for any j greater than i. (Only to the square root of n, because Subtract the square of i Take the square root of the result, and ...


9

There is a number of concepts here. For a tail-recursive function, the compiler can optimize it into a loop and so it does not need any stack or heap space. You can rewrite your count function into a simple tail-recursive function by writing: let rec count acc n = if n = 0 then acc else count (acc + 1) (n - 1) This will be compiled into ...


9

This usually won't cause a huge performance issue. This is due to branch predicting. Refer to this famous question. Branch predicting is basically assembly's way of guessing which way the if-statement will evaluate to. If it guesses right, it will take almost no time. If it guesses wrong, it will backtrack and cause performance issues. The branch predictor ...


8

I find this problem interesting. GCC is known for producing less than optimal code, but I find it fascinating to find ways to "encourage" it to produce better code (for hottest/bottleneck code only, of course), without micro-managing too heavily. In this particular case, I looked at three "tools" I use for such situations: volatile: If it is important ...


7

you only can have a solution of 2 if you have 2 more +1 than -1 so for n==24 a_solution = [-1,]*11 + [1,]*13 now you can just use itertools.permutations to get every permutation of this for L in itertools.permutations(a_solution): print L it would probably be faster to use itertools.combinations to eliminate duplicates for indices in ...


6

You can improve the runtime a lot by observing that map sum (produceContiguous d n) (which has runtime Ω(m^2), m the length of drop n d -- possibly O(m^3) time because you're appending to the end of acc on each iteration) can be collapsed to scanl (+) 0 (drop n d) (which has runtime O(m)). There are plenty of other stylistic changes I would make as well, but ...


5

As per the documentation of the Tree Map (emphasis my own): The map is sorted according to the natural ordering of its keys, or by a Comparator provided at map creation time, depending on which constructor is used. In your case, you state that the items have no particular order and it does not seem that you are after any particular order, but ...


5

The problem at hand boils down to finding (an approximate) reciprocal square root. SSE and AVX include an approximate reciprocal square root machine instruction, rsqrt, that is particularly well suited for this. Per the original AMD64 Architecture Programmer's Manual, volume 1, the maximum relative error of the reciprocal square root variants is at most ...


5

Changing the structure from that of a set (sieve) - one bit per candidate - to storing primes (e.g. in a list, vector or tree structure) actually increases storage requirements. Example: there are 203.280.221 primes below 2^32. An array of uint32_t of that size requires about 775 MiB whereas the corresponding bitmap (a.k.a. set representation) occupies ...


5

It cannot be optimized when compiling Java source to .class-files. It can be optimized in runtime by JIT compiler if both saveState() and resetToSavedState() are called from the same method and both are inlined there during the JIT compilation (or some deeper call-chain is fully inlined). Inlining is quite possible here as saveState() and resetToSavedState() ...


5

If it were a simple matter of a list of do's and don'ts we could simply write a program to optimize memory usage. The first step is to write correct, well-designed, maintainable, and easy-to-read code. Next, using Go's testing package, benchmark critical functions. For example. a real case, BenchmarkOriginal 30000 44349 ns/op 52792 B/op ...


5

I would definitely generate the off-diagonal elements of the adjacency matrices with binary encoding: n = 4; %// number of nodes m = n*(n-1)/2; offdiags = dec2bin(0:2^m-1,m)-48; %//every 2^m-1 possible configurations If you have the Statistics and Machine Learning Toolbox, then squareform will easily create the matrices for you, one by one: %// this is ...


4

Isn't that just giving away memory? Because until the time the for is called, there are 4 bytes in memory which are not used. I don't think so. In the common platforms that I have worked in, Linux and Windows, the size of the stack frame is same regardless of whether you declare the variables at the top of the function or declare them as you go. The ...


4

Here's a proof that, in the absence of the anomalous jumps mentioned by harold in the comments, the "start small" algorithm is optimal: First, let's establish that "start small" always produces a feasible solution -- that is, one that doesn't contain any short encoding of a too-long jump. The algorithm essentially amounts to repeatedly asking the question ...


4

You should (almost) never store calculated data in a database. It ends up creating maintenance and application nightmares when the calculated values end up out of sync with the values from which they are calculated. At this point you're probably saying to yourself, "Well, I'll do a really good job keeping them in sync." It doesn't matter, because down the ...


4

Why is it "much less likely" for properties to be optimized by the compiler in this manner, and when can one expect for a particular property to be or not to be optimized? Properties are not always just wrappers for a field. If there is any degree of logic in a property, it becomes significantly more difficult for a compiler to prove that it is correct ...


4

Another, possibly slightly more efficient option is to use a macro to construct the code for you: #define DO_N(name, ...) for(int i = 0; i < big; i++){name(__VA_ARGS__);/*shared code*/} if (condition1) { DO_N(do1, .../*arguments here*/) } else if (condition 2) { DO_N(do2, ...) } else { DO_N(do3, ...) } #undef DO_N Its ugly, but I think it ...


4

The order is important when a member variable depends on another member variable when using initializer lists: Imagine a class with two variable where the constructor of the second variable (varC) needs the first (varB) class A { B varB; C varC; A() : varC(varB) { } }; The order decides in which steps the constructors are ...


4

Have a look at set.intersection: >>> nlist = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] >>> mlist = [1, 3, 5, 7, 9] >>> klist = [1, 4, 7, 10] >>> set(nlist).intersection(mlist) {1, 3, 5, 9, 7} >>> set(nlist).intersection(mlist).intersection(klist) {1, 7}


4

First of all, normal people use gcc -O3 -march=native -S and then edit the .s to test small modifications to compiler output. I hope you had fun hex-editing that change. :P You could also use Agner Fog's excellent objconv to make disassembly that can be assembled back into a binary with your choice of NASM, YASM, MASM, or AT&T syntax. Using some of ...


3

You don't actually need to worry about doing the calculation twice. There is more overhead to doing an insert and update. So, you should do those calculations at the same time. MySQL extends the use of the having clause, so this is easy: CREATE temp LIKE table; ALTER TABLE temp ADD r FLOAT; INSERT INTO temp(x, y, r) SELECT x, y, x*x+y*y as r ...


3

Try the following, clang-style attribute specification: [[clang::optnone]] void blabla(void); EDIT: Clang 3.3 is pretty outdated. Use a more recent version, and your original ((optnone)) code will work.


3

Following is just a rewrite of @Martin Morgan's answer, utilizing the fast subsetting of data.table. It is around 3x faster than the data.frame approach. library(data.table) library(matrixStats) # for efficient rowAlls function g01 <- function(df) { setDT(df) ind <- df[-nrow(df), 1:3, with=FALSE] == df[-1, 1:3, with=FALSE] rind <- ...


3

Try this: def get_object_list(self, request): return super(CategoryResource, self).get_object_list(request) \ .prefetch_related('items', 'items__categories') Do not use select_related, because it return duplicate rows. prefetch_related made one query, that returns all items and Django ORM match it to proper rows. EDIT Change ...


3

If you isolate the for optimized_a and run, you see the error it throws is error 8 - this is the positive derivative error. Both BFGS and SLSQP are gradient search methods, which means they take your initial guess, and evaluate the gradient and its derivative, and look for the best direction to take a step in, always stepping downhill and stopping when the ...


3

I've created code which tests the proformance of BinarySearch, TreeMap and HashMap for the given problem. In case you are rebuilding the collection each time, HashMap is the fastest (even with standard Object's hashCode() implementation!), sort+array binary search goes second and a TreeMap is last (due to complex rebuilding procedure). proc array: 2395 ...


3

fzero indeed only works on scalars. However, you can turn your criterion into a scalar: You are interested in AOA where any of the elements in the vector becomes zero, in which case you rewrite your objective function to return two output arguments: minDifference, which is min(Difference), and Difference. The first output, minDifference is the minimum of the ...


3

Load h in a vector of strings, and loop once through h2 by comparing each string with the vector's contents. Since your test is symmetrical, you can choose h to be the smallest of the two files. That way, you'll save memory and time, especially if one of the files is much larger than the other. Using a set (std::set) instead of a vector could also help if ...



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