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4

You can efficiently use np.einsum(). See a testing version below: def func2(X, y): num_examples, num_features = np.shape(X) weights = np.random.uniform(-1./(2*num_examples), 1./(2*num_examples), num_features) K = (np.dot(X, weights) - y) return weights - alpha/num_examples*np.einsum('i,ij->j', K, X)


2

You can get new_weights directly using matrix-multiplication with np.dot like so - new_weights = self.weights- ((self.alpha / num_examples) * np.dot(K[None],X))


0

Create a unique index on Conn (IDConn, connNum). This should remove the last live off the query plan as the index can satisfy all needed columns.


0

As I commented, you should be able to get a pretty substantial improvement by changing your algorithm, without messing with cython at all. Your current code is O(len(list1)*len(list2)), but you can reduce this to O(len(list1)+len(list2)) by using a set. You can also simplify the code by using the builtin any function: def conflicts(list1,list2): numIt = ...


1

It depends Insertion/deletion at the beginning of the array cost O(n), if array is not full due to shifting of the elements. For arraylist its O(n) Insertion at the end cost O(1) if array is not full. For arraylist O(1) if array is not full and O(n) if array is full deletion at the end cost O(1). For arraylist O(n) Insertion/deletion at the middle cost ...


-2

Indexing, as @RippeR suggests, is my first guess too. My second guess is something like this: switch(theChar){ break; case 0: result[0] = 0; ... result[7] = 0; break; case 1: result[0] = 0; ... result[7] = 1; ... break; case 255: result[0] = 1; ... result[7] = 1; } It's wordy code, but you could get the preprocessor to help you write it. The ...


1

But 5 Threads Supposed to increase the performance..? That's what >>you<< suppose. But in fact, there are no guarantees that adding threads will increase performance. But according to what I have studied 2*(no of cores) of threads should give optimal result ... If you read that somewhere, then you either misread it or it is plain wrong. ...


0

I have found this amazing example #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <chrono> std::vector<double> f_val(std::size_t i, std::size_t n) { auto v = std::vector<double>( n ); for (std::size_t k = 0; k < v.size(); ++k) { v[k] = static_cast<double>(k + i); } return v; } void ...


3

Wouldn't preprocessing be faster? 2^8 possibilities is pretty much, but then again, just split it into two parts, and it's only 2^4 = 16 variables. Make array consiting of 16 "values", where each value is array filled with 4 floats with right values. Then your cost would be only 2 * (copy data from preprocessed array to new array). I'm not too deep into ...


0

Loops, conditions, and going through an actual array in memory are of course not the vector way. So here's an other idea, though it's a bit annoying in only AVX. Since without AVX2 you can do almost nothing with an ymm register (nothing useful anyway), just use two xmm registers and then in the end vinsertf128 the high part to form the whole thing. Mixing ...


0

void byteToFloat(const uint8_t byteIn, float *const restrict floatOut) { floatOut[0]=(byteIn&0x01)?1.0f:0.0f; floatOut[1]=(byteIn&0x02)?1.0f:0.0f; floatOut[2]=(byteIn&0x04)?1.0f:0.0f; floatOut[3]=(byteIn&0x08)?1.0f:0.0f; floatOut[4]=(byteIn&0x10)?1.0f:0.0f; ...


0

Along with the Performance aspect, you also need to be careful whenever you include the <script> tag inside the <head> tag. Let's consider the following example: <head> <script>document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML="hello";</script> </head> <body> <p id="demo">The content of the document......</p> ...


1

You could go for a caching solution, but first numpy arrays are not hashable, and second you only need to cache a few values depending on whether the algorithm goes back and forth a lot on x. If the algorithm only moves from one point to the next, you can cache only the last computed point in this way, with your f_hes and f_jac being just lambda interfaces ...


0

I think the least number of steps could be 21, which you could perform with a handheld calculator or pencil and paper (or just in your head if you're a good multiplier), although I would not expect someone to think this through during a job interview. Let's call our palindrome xyzzyx and our two numbers a1a2a3 and b1b2b3. If we make the lucky assumption ...


0

"i" and "j" could be declared for optimize your code. First optimization with cython is accomplished using explicit declaration. You can use cython -a yourcode.py and see some automatic suggestion of possible changes for optimize your python code with cython (yellow lines). You can work with c module generated (work perfect!). Some handwrite cython ...


1

It was very useful to know if IDConn_FK and connNum were unique on their table because this changes lots of things. If they're both unique on their tables, you wouldn't need to group results because there wouldn't be multiple occurrences of the same value for connNum. So, in this case, one optimizations would be to not group by because there is only a ...


1

For your size of data, there is no real optimization possible. For larger data, Oracle should choose other execution paths. You might try this: select c.connNum, (select min(i.walkingDistanceMinutes from inter i where i.IDConn_FK = c.idConn ) as minimalWalkingDistance from conn c ; I'm not 100% sure this is exactly the same ...


1

You just want a basic aggregate per group. select fk, min(price) from your_table group by fk;


3

Your question is a little vague and will likely attract downvotes as being "too broad". That said, here's my take on this... The biggest issue I see is that your application structure is very different from the recommended L5 structure - or even the standard MVC structure - that it's no wonder you're getting confused. Let's talk about your "Logic" section: ...


1

Sort by startpoint, count the number of inversions in the list of endpoints using the mergesort-derived O(n log n)-time algorithm.


2

Upgrade comment. I don't think you can vectorise your code due to the optimize() function ... a previous question. However, as an alternative, you can use the Vectorize() function. Rather than a true vectorised solution (in terms of vector in / vector out at a low(ish) level) it is a wrapper for various other functions. (To see the code of Vectorize just ...


0

You could always use a build task runner to automate your development process. Using web performance plugins such as the ones listed here would allow you to develop and automate your CSS/JS minification, image optimization, etc. A great tool to use is Grunt which allows you to work with your existing Wordpress development workflow. This means that you only ...


0

The simplest solution I can think of is pasted below. The logic is to record which row and column to set zero while iterating. import java.util.HashSet; import java.util.Set; public class MatrixExamples { public static void zeroOut(int[][] myArray) { Set<Integer> rowsToZero = new HashSet<>(); Set<Integer> columnsToZero ...


1

Where should we learn about this short-circuit evaluation? The specification is handy, as is MDN. But the short version is: The left-hand operand to && or || is always evaluated, giving us the left-hand value. With &&, if the left-hand value is falsey, the right-hand operand is not evaluated; the expression's value is the left-hand ...


1

The best optimization which I would do is to substitute your stringDate as a normal date (timestamp or date). If you really want to optimize your myproduct/module, you can push it to application layer implementing the logic. If there is no module, than take myProduct thus storing it only if it is different. Keep in mind that it is important to know what ...


1

Do it in the DBMS, and wrap it in a transaction. To explain: Load your data into a temporary table in MySQL in the fastest way possible. Bulk load, insert, do whatever works. Look at "load data infile". Outer-join the temporary table to the target table, and INSERT those rows where the PK column of the target table is NULL. Outer-join the temporary table ...


1

There are many possible 'answers' to your questions. 13/second -- a lot that can be done... INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE ... ('IODKU') is usually the best way to do "update, else insert" (unless I don't know what you mean by it). Batched inserts is much faster than inserting one row at a time. Optimal is around 100 rows giving 10x speedup. IODKU ...


0

uncss: { dist: { // files: { // '<%= config.dist %>/styles/main.css': ['<%= config.dist %>/index.html'], // '<%= config.dist %>/styles/blog.css': ['<%= config.dist %>/blog.html'] // } files: [ { src: ['<%= config.dist %>/index.html'], dest: '<%= config.dist ...


0

in Sum_Square_error.m you dont declare an anonymous function make it a regular function so change f = @(c) Sum_Square_error(c,input_weight,X_test,Y_test); to function f = Sum_Square_error(c,input_weight,X_test,Y_test) now in your main, when you say @fun you actually need to pass in the paremeters explicitly ...


2

GCC's -flto emits a serialized form of GCC's internal representation, as you discovered. Then, at link time, the linker reinvokes GCC and passes it the objects that need final compilation. GCC reads the internal representation and does the work. I think the actual work is done in collect2, which is part of GCC that is used when invoking the linker (I'm a ...


2

From https://gcc.gnu.org/wiki/LinkTimeOptimization: Despite the "link time" name, LTO does not need to use any special linker features. The basic mechanism needed is the detection of GIMPLE sections inside object files. This is currently implemented in collect2 [which is called by gcc; -ps]. Therefore, LTO will work on any linker already supported ...


1

Your proposed solution is very close. In words, you're defining fp as a function of two arguments, and would like CEQ_DA to be a function of w, which solves fp for CEQ, with that given w. The only issue is that fzero doesn't know which parameter of fp to solve over, because it can't match anonymous function parameters and fp parameters by name. The answer ...


3

In addition to @David H's answer, which provides the solution of naming the interval argument, here is an explanation: This is a consequence of partial matching of arguments. See the language definition section 4.3.2 for details. In brief, the matching works in three steps: 1.) Exact name matches are searched for between the supplied arguments and ...


4

Naming all your arguments is usually a good idea, especially when working with the ... argument. It fixes the problem in this case: xmin <- optimize(f = gg, interval = c(0,1), tol = 0.0001, Price = 1000, Strike = 1000, texp = 1, int = 0.02, PutPrice = 69.4) Not sure why interval is matched by int, but that's the problem here.


0

You may need multiple structures. Each 9 digit mobile number requires slightly less than 30 bits of memory. When the number of those number is small, simply a (sorted) array, or a dynamic hash table of 32-bit integers should be adequate. When the amount of those numbers increases, a bit vector of size 10^9 bits or ~119 MB associating one bit for each ...


2

Preliminaries reading on the database documentation I can't find which is the best answer Database documentation informs you about how to use the product, it doesn't inform you about how to design a database. For that, you need education. The platform is not defined yet...so we are flexible in this stage Well, the most important advice is, get a ...


1

@Sandathrion, in answer to your additional question in the comments "Could you create an answer with how to do that with the toy example above?" it's quite hard, as the toy example doesn't do anything, but if a nearly-as-simple example is used to change a class attribute from 0 to 1 over 1,000 objects: import timeit ### values held externally in numpy ...


3

If you only wish to call all the functions in the list, the for loop should be the most efficient since it does not create a new list (it actually is the most efficient on my machine). Note also, that in Python 3 the map solutions wouldn't work, because it creates generator that is evaluated later on.


1

Using larger arrays (of 1000 ooks), the plain loop is faster (in my tests), followed by the list comprehension, and then (60 % slower) the map method. The reason for the plain loop beeing fastest is (probably) that it doesn't have to collect the return values to a new list. The reason for map beeing so slow is that it needs an extra function call (the ...


0

Not sure if about how you are using a presenter or a view directly, but from a model perspective, you should be able to do it chaining the activerecord associations (which it sounds like you already have in mind). For example current_contractor.assignment.steps.projects.where(:status=>'active').count You could refine this a little by making an ...


2

If you ignore all of the calculations, and just look at the loop counters… for ( int i = 0; i < n; i++ ) { for ( int j = 0; j < n; j++ ) printf("%d\n", n * i + j); } You'll see that ri + j, which is n * i + j, counts up from 0 (inclusive) to n2 (exclusive). Therefore, a[ri + j] is just walking along the array one element at a time. You can ...


2

The code goes through an array of n*n elements. In the first one it is indexed like by row and column, which are calculated separately and then added together. But since the data is in one array without gaps, there is no need to calculate the indexes this way for sequential access. If you think about the indexer in the first: i*n + j, it means that after i ...


1

Interestingly, using -fdata-sections can make the literal pools of your functions, and thus your functions themselves larger. I've noticed this on ARM in particular, but it's likely to be true elsewhere. The binary I was testing only grew by a quarter of a percent, but it did grow. Looking at the disassembly of the changed functions it was clear why. If ...


5

I don't think the programs are equivalent. In the second version (using algorithms) a new vector of doubles is being populated and an extra iteration is also involved. You could try this (c++11 version), it is equivalent of the first version. I haven't tried running it, it should work with some minor changes. MeanAndSigma getMeanAndSigma2(const ...


1

I don't have the StringUtil library available (I have no choice over that) so using standard Java I came up with this .. If you're confident that your set data won't include any commas, you could use: mySet.toString().replaceAll("\\[|\\]","").replaceAll(","," "); A set of "a", "b", "c" converts via .toString() to string "[a,b,c]". Then replace the ...


1

One useful mechanism to prune the search tree is to notice that the highest digit of the product a * b doesn't change often. E.g. a = 111; b = 112 a*b = 12432 ; b = 113 a*b = 12543 ; b = 114 a*b = 12654 ; ... ; b = 180 a*b = 19980 ; b = 181 a*b = 20091 = (19980 + a) Thus, for all the values in ...


2

Your code has no side effects: it doesn't send anything over network, not writing files, so gcc elides that code. Modern gcc version have -fdump-* options that allow to log every phase of compiler: $ gcc -O2 -fdump-tree-all elide.c After that gcc will generate a bunch of output files: $ ls -1 | head a.out elide.c elide.c.001t.tu elide.c.003t.original ...


2

Your code doesn't actually do anything. GCC and most compilers are very smart. It can look at that, determine it has no visible effects and remove it entirely.


7

Not more true with your edited question: Your code is declaring a single-element array int x[1]; and is accessing it with an out of bounds index (the index should be less than 1 but non negative, so can only be 0) as x[1]; this is typical undefined behavior and the compiler can legally optimize it by emitting any kind of code. BTW, GCC 4.9 (on my ...


3

How do you set optimizations? For me, it works (big_num = 1000): $ gcc -o x -O0 x.c && time ./x ./x 2.08s user 0.00s system 99% cpu 2.086 total $ gcc -o x -O1 x.c && time ./x ./x 0.31s user 0.00s system 99% cpu 0.309 total $ gcc -o x -O2 x.c && time ./x ./x 0.00s user 0.00s system 0% cpu 0.000 total



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