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16

A query's projection can only have one instance of a given name. As your WHERE clause shows, you have several tables with a column called ID. Because you are selecting * your projection will have several columns called ID. Or it would have were it not for the compiler hurling ORA-00918. The solution is quite simple: you will have to expand the projection ...


15

SELECT * FROM ( SELECT t.*, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY station_id, obs_year ORDER BY entity_id) AS rn FROM mytable t ) WHERE rn > 1


13

Searched Oracle Support and found this: Bug 5368296 - ANSI join SQL may not report ORA-918 for ambiguous column [ID 5368296.8] Versions confirmed as being affected: 10.2.0.3 10.2.0.4 This issue is fixed in 10.2.0.4 Patch 2 on Windows Platforms 10.2.0.5 (Server Patch Set) 11.1.0.6 (Base Release) Not posting more than that since you need an Oracle ...


11

The error message is actually (surprise!) telling you exactly what the problem is. Once you use the USING clause for a particular column, you cannot use a column qualifier/table alias for that column name in any other part of your query. The only way to resolve this is to not use the USING clause anywhere in your query, since you have to have the qualifier ...


8

Can't say when it was fixed, but here's my results: Connected to: Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.1.0 - 64bit Production With the Partitioning, Real Application Clusters, Automatic Storage Management, OLAP, Data Mining and Real Application Testing options SQL> SELECT * 2 FROM USER_TABLES TAB 3 JOIN USER_TRIGGERS TRG ON ...


7

My preference is never to use USING; always use ON. I like to my SQL to be very explicit and the USING clause feels one step removed in my opinion. In this case, the error is coming about because you have account_no in mc_current_view, account_master, and ml_client_account so the actual join can't be resolved. Hope this helps.


6

You have multiple columns named the same thing in your inner query, so the error is raised in the outer query. If you get rid of the outer query, it should run, although still be confusing: SELECT DISTINCT coaches.id, people.*, users.*, coaches.* FROM "COACHES" INNER JOIN people ON people.id = coaches.person_id INNER JOIN users ON ...


6

Have you tried to do a binary search? e.g. If your original query looks like Select col1 ,col2 ,col3 ,col4 from MyTable you can start with commenting the 2nd half Select col1 ,col2 /*,col3 ,col4 */ from MyTable If you still get the error, run the query again commenting some column from the other half: Select ...


5

Hibernate Criteria API supports a special {alias} placeholder for this case: crit.add( Restrictions.sqlRestriction( "translate(upper({alias}.nombre), 'ÁÉÍÓÚ', 'AEIOU') like translate(upper(?),'ÁÉÍÓÚ', 'AEIOU')", param+"%", Hibernate.STRING));


4

Because you do a select * at the top. user_id firstname lastname DEPARTMENT are present in both subqueries, and with select *it would get two columns with the same name. If you want to merge the two subqueries (such that the resulting set of columns would be user_id, firstname, lastname, DEPARTMENT, jc_name, ug_name) you should do a natural join: SELECT ...


3

I think you have to specify aliasses for (at least one of) table1.id and table2.id. And possibly for any other corresponding columnnames as well. So instead of SELECT t1.*, t2.* FROM table1 t1, table2 use something like: SELECT t1.id t1id, t2.id t2id [rest of columns] FROM table1 t1, table2 t2 I'm not familiar with Oracle syntax, but I think you'll get ...


3

You can try this SELECT COL_A, COL_B, COL_C FROM Table1 UNION SELECT COL_A, COL_B, 0 As COL_C FROM Table2


3

You certainly cannot apply "Union" to your tables. It can be applied only if both queries return same number (and of similar type) of columns. You can join the two tables but would have to use "table alias" while joining since "record_num" field is common in both the tables. Here is the query that would work for you select table1.record_num, ...


3

SELECT entity_id, station_id, obs_year FROM mytable t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 from mytable t2 Where t1.station_id = t2.station_id AND t1.obs_year = t2.obs_year AND t1.RowId <> t2.RowId)


3

I re-wrote your query as: SELECT TO_CHAR(SYSDATE,'DD MONTH,YYYY'), a.appl_no, a.assigned_to, b.co_name, b.co_name2, a.credit_acct_no, a.credit_bank_no, a.credit_branch_no, a.service_id FROM newappl a JOIN newappl_hq b ON b.appl_no = a.appl_no WHERE a.appl_no = ? AND rownum = 1 AND ...


3

The ambiguous column error message indicates that you have joined two (or more) columns in your query which share the same column name. The proper way to solve this is to give each table in the query an alias and then prefix all column references with the appropriate alias. I agree that won't be fun for such a large query but I'm afraid you will have to ...


2

You are using ANSI SQL. I'm guessing that it associates the STATUS in the where clause with the driving table. When you use "oracle" syntax you'll see the expected behaviour. SELECT * FROM USER_TABLES TAB, USER_TRIGGERS TRG, USER_CONSTRAINTS CON WHERE TRG.TABLE_NAME = TAB.TABLE_NAME AND CON.TABLE_NAME = TAB.TABLE_NAME AND STATUS = 'DISABLED'


2

Re-write of your query SELECT t1.entity_id, t1.station_id, t1.obs_year FROM mytable t1 INNER JOIN ( SELECT entity_id, station_id, obs_year FROM mytable GROUP BY entity_id, station_id, obs_year HAVING COUNT(*) > 1) dupes ON t1.station_id = dupes.station_id AND t1.obs_year = dupes.obs_year I think the ambiguous column error (ORA-00918) was because you ...


2

Change the 3 fields in the initial select to be SELECT t1.entity_id, t1.station_id, t1.obs_year


2

You're selecting main_contact.cont_role_desc twice. Also, you have two columns called 'cont_name' and two columns called 'cont_id', which also might not make it happy. If dropping the extra cont_name doesn't work, maybe try aliasing those? SELECT main_contact.cont_name, sub_contact.cont_name AS sub_cont_name, main_contact.cont_role_desc, ...


2

Probably right here MV_K(TEKLIF_NO1,TEKLIF_NO2, :S_TARIH_B) AS KV. It should be something like MV_K(A.TEKLIF_NO1,A.TEKLIF_NO2, :S_TARIH_B) AS KV since that column exists in A,B and C


2

I don't have oracle with me, but it appears that it's the inline query (SELECT FROM DUAL) that's the issue. I recommend aliasing all the fields in that inline query and trying again. INSERT WHEN 1=1 THEN INTO TEST1 (COL1, COL2, COL3) SELECT 1 AS c1, 0 AS c2, 0 AS c3 FROM DUAL;


2

Use aliases : SQL> CREATE TABLE TEST1(COL1 INTEGER, COL2 INTEGER, COL3 INTEGER); Table created. SQL> INSERT WHEN 1=1 2 THEN INTO TEST1 (COL1, COL2, COL3) 3 SELECT 1 "1", 0 "2", 0 "3" FROM DUAL; 1 row created. The reason you get this ambiguous column error is because when you don't provide an alias, Oracle will use a set of rules to name ...


2

It is always a good idea to add the table name/alias to the column like this select c.customer_id, c.customer_name, c.customer_address, o.order_id, o.order_date, o.amount from customers c inner join orders o on c.customer_id = o.customer_id If you don't then the DB don't know which column to take and both tables have ...


2

Documentation to the rescue: Apply a constraint expressed in SQL. Any occurrences of {alias} will be replaced by the table alias. (emphasis mine)


2

I was searching for an answer to something similar. I was referencing an aliased sub-query that had a couple of NULL columns. I had to alias the NULL columns because I had more than one; select a.*, t2.column, t2.column, t2.column (select t1.column, t1.column, NULL, NULL, t1.column from t1 where t1='VALUE') a left outer join t2 on t2.column=t1.column; Once ...


1

If you could modify the query syntactically (or get the users to do so) to use explicit JOIN syntax with the USING clause, this would automatically fix the problem at hand: SELECT t1.*, t2.* FROM table1 t1 JOIN table2 t2 USING (id) The USING clause does the same as ON t1.id = t2.id (or the implicit JOIN you have in the question), except that only one ...


1

More confirmed bug about this here: http://oracledoug.com/serendipity/index.php?/archives/1555-Bug-Hunting.html Latest update is that it's fixed in 11.2.0.2


1

SELECT COL_A,COL_B,COL_C FROM TABLE_1 UNION SELECT COL_A,COL_B,'0' AS COL_C FROM TABLE_2 You may also be able to get away with SELECT COL_A,COL_B,COL_C FROM TABLE_1 UNION SELECT COL_A,COL_B,'0' FROM TABLE_2 The basic idea is that both must have same number of columns of the same corresponding data types.


1

What happens you use use this? INSERT WHEN 1=1 THEN INTO TEST1 (COL1, COL2, COL3) SELECT 1 as col1, 0 as col2, 0 as col3 FROM DUAL;



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