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28

You have missed out the field name id in the second NOT LIKE. Try: SELECT * FROM transactions WHERE id NOT LIKE '1%' AND id NOT LIKE '2%' The AND in the where clause joins 2 full condition expressions such as id NOT LIKE '1%' and can't be used to list multiple values that the id is 'not like'.


13

INSERT INTO NEW_TABLE ( No_COUNT ) SELECT COUNT(*) FROM TABLE2;


8

Try this: EXEC sp_executesql @sql, N'@id int', @id More info at this great article: http://www.sommarskog.se/dynamic_sql.html As for the output, your SELECT needs to look something like this: SELECT @countVal = COUNT(id) FROM owner.myTable WHERE id = @id I'm selecting 'id' instead of '*' to avoid pulling unnecessary data... Then your dynamic sql ...


7

Actually, it's easy to solve the original problem. You just have to qualify the *. select is_parent, animals.* from animals; should work just fine. Aliases for the table names also work.


5

Try "COMMENT" instead of [COMMENT]. This is alternate syntax commonly accepted by various DBMSes. I have used this syntax to refer to columns having dots or UTF8 characters in their names in SQLite.


5

You can create a trigger in Oracle that will log all errors (or pretty much all - NO_DATA_FOUND is not considered an error). In the example below, any error in the schema is recorded in the TRACK_DETAIL table (error in one row, failed SQL in the next). You can make it more sophisticated with a sequence number, date/time etc. create table track_detail (val ...


5

I'm not sure about the oracle (now that the answer got upvoted and commented I'm relatively sure ;-) ), but I'd expect it to be either INSERT INTO table VALUES … or INSERT INTO table SELECT … (with no VALUES keyword). I failed, of course, to read the whole query ;-)


5

You need to specify the column in both expressions. SELECT * FROM transactions WHERE id NOT LIKE '1%' AND id NOT LIKE '2%'


4

You've missed the id out before the NOT; it needs to be specified. SELECT * FROM transactions WHERE id NOT LIKE '1%' AND id NOT LIKE '2%'


4

SELECT * FROM ALL_TAB_COLS WHERE UPPER(COLUMN_NAME) = 'NAME'; will show you all columns called NAME EDIT: Based on your comment, aren't you missing the operators in your WHERE clause? ie = select name, id from "TEST" where id :2 -- Surely you mean: id = :2 AND name :1 -- Surely you mean: name = :2 order by id desc EDIT 2: Based on ...


4

In a complex outer join expression you would put the (+) operator on all relevant columns, as in: AND D.IFSC_CODE=UPPER(substr(B.BANK_CODE (+),1,4)) For example: SQL> WITH table_a AS ( 2 SELECT '0001' ID FROM dual 3 UNION ALL SELECT '0002' FROM dual 4 UNION ALL SELECT '0003' FROM dual 5 ), table_b AS ( 6 SELECT '0001a' ID ...


4

I think that you need to put the (+) operator immediately after the column name that it applies to. trunc(CT1,'Mi')=trunc(CT2 (+),'Mi') "The (+) operator can be applied only to a column, not to an arbitrary expression. However, an arbitrary expression can contain one or more columns marked with the (+) operator." (from ...


4

Yes, there is something wrong with the SQL, and it is that you wrote a comma before FROM dual. This causes Oracle's SQL parser to complain.


3

The intuitive version is almost correct. I needed only to alias the table for it to work... select count(1) from table_of_my_messages m where m.user_data.relatedid = 'abcdefgh';


3

The problem was that the client was running the wrong client driver version, 9.2.0.1, and there are known problems with that version.


3

date isn't a function in Oracle, so to_char(date('2014-10-11 00:00:00'), 'MMYYYY') means nothing. However, there is a to_date function which works like the inverse of to_char. Instead of date('2014-10-11 00:00:00'), something like this should work: TO_DATE('2014-10-11 00:00:00', 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS')


2

There is no merit in doing this in production code. We should explicitly name the columns we want rather than using the SELECT * construct. As for ad hoc querying, get yourself an IDE - SQL Developer, TOAD, PL/SQL Developer, etc - which allows us to manipulate queries and result sets without needing extensions to SQL.


2

Good question, I've often wondered this myself but have then accepted it as one of those things... Similar problem is this: sql>select geometrie.SDO_GTYPE from ngg_basiscomponent ORA-00904: "GEOMETRIE"."SDO_GTYPE": invalid identifier where geometrie is a column of type mdsys.sdo_geometry. Add an alias and the thing works. sql>select ...


2

Lots of good answers so far on why select * shouldn't be used and they're all perfectly correct. However, don't think any of them answer the original question on why the particular syntax fails. Sadly, I think the reason is... "because it doesn't". I don't think it's anything to do with single-table vs. multi-table queries: This works fine: select * from ...


2

If you can enable sql tracing from the application code somehow (alter session set sql_trace=true), the statements will show up in the trace files on the database host.


2

Try using ANSI syntax: T1 LEFT OUTER JOIN T2 ON TRUNC(CT1,'Mi')=TRUNC(CT2,'Mi') The (+) outer join syntax has some limitations, this could be one of them. Of course, if you change this join, you'll have to change them all - you can't mix the two.


2

Definetely not an issue with the oracle database and not an issue with Oracle SQL Developer either. If this is the actual query, you have an extra comma after the second column. SQL> CREATE TABLE T1 ( c1 VARCHAR2 (50), c2 VARCHAR2 (50) ); Table created. SQL> SELECT C1, C2 FROM t1; no rows selected SQL> SELECT c1, c2, FROM t1; SELECT c1, c2, ...


2

It's a good idea not to surround column and table names with double-quotation marks unless you are know what you are doing and confident you need that. In Oracle, database object names (including table and columns) are not case-sensitive and assumed upper-case unless you include them into double-quotes. E.g, if a table created as TEST, it can be referred ...


2

In a SQL statement, the CASE statement would need to be something like SELECT CASE WHEN math BETWEEN 90 AND 100 THEN 'A' WHEN math BETWEEN 80 AND 90 THEN 'B' WHEN math BETWEEN 0 AND 80 THEN 'C' ELSE 'Invalid Score' END FROM score The CASE variable WHEN syntax is valid in ...


2

The SQL statement you posted has an extra comma. If you run the statement in SQL*Plus, it will throw the ORA-00936: missing expression and show you exactly where the error occurs SQL> ed Wrote file afiedt.buf 1 INSERT INTO Services (service_id, service_name, service_facility) 2 SELECT 06, 'Rooms', 3 (SELECT facility_id, FROM Facilities WHERE ...


2

Your insert statement should be: INSERT INTO Services ( service_id, service_name, service_facility ) SELECT 06, 'Rooms', facility_id FROM Facilities WHERE facility_name = 'Hotel' In it's current state the query i provided will add a service record for rooms for each facility with the name ...


2

Remove the comma? select /*+USE_HASH( a b ) */ to_char(date, 'MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS') as LABEL, ltrim(rtrim(substr(oled, 9, 16))) as VALUE from rrfh a, rrf b where ltrim(rtrim(substr(oled, 1, 9))) = 'stata kish' and a.xyz = b.xyz Have a look at FROM SELECTING from multiple tables You can include multiple tables in the FROM clause by listing the ...


2

You have your count and select clauses mixed up; this: CASE WHEN COUNT(SELECT DISTINCT v_date should be CASE WHEN (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT v_date) Some of your aliases are reserved words, but I assume you've changed those for posting, as you'd get an ORA-00923 with exactly what is in the question. As an aside, if your a_year field is a number then ...


1

Instead of using the condition I would do this: select CASE WHEN math BETWEEN 90 AND 100 THEN 'A' WHEN math BETWEEN 80 AND 90 THEN 'B' WHEN math BETWEEN 0 AND 80 THEN 'C' ELSE 'Invalid score' END from score I don't think Oracle likes the BETWEEN function without a preceding ...


1

A few ideas to try: Before Set oRSPaymodes = connADO.execute(sSql), put in a MsbBox and see what SQL is being executed. Is it valid? Will it run in a Oracle query analyzer(if there is one)? Hard code a valid value in place of sRequestPaymodeKey. Does it work then?



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