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3

This should work provided you don't have an input that looks like %ABC#%ABC# SELECT REGEXP_REPLACE( '%ABC#abc\%ABC#', '((^|[^\])(\\\\)*)%ABC#', '\1XXX' ) FROM DUAL; This will either match: The start of the string ^ or a non-slash character [^\] followed by any number of pairs of slash characters then, finally, the characters %ABC#. This will match ...


3

Probably the only way to achieve this is to create a view and have the application insert into the view. An instead-of trigger on the view can then handle the insert statements on the view and decide to actually insert into the table or not.


3

First of all, 6M records is not very much, so in these days it should not be a problem for any mainstream DBMS. However, I see two aspects: 1) Space assessment - approximate how much space will be needed. For this you can insert in a table several records that will be similar to yours and extrapolate this to 6M records. E.g. (I have used SQL Server, but ...


2

You could do it using: CASE LAG() For example, SQL> WITH sample_data AS( 2 SELECT 1 row_id, 'P1' Fname, 'xxxx' Lname FROM dual UNION ALL 3 SELECT 1 row_id, 'P1' Fname, 'xxxx' Lname FROM dual UNION ALL 4 SELECT 1 row_id, 'P2' Fname, 'xxxx' Lname FROM dual UNION ALL 5 SELECT 1 row_id, 'P2' Fname, 'xxxy' Lname FROM dual UNION ALL 6 ...


2

You have to concatenate the '%' literals: AND APP_FRAMES.APP_EXT_CODE LIKE '%' || :IN_APP_EXT_CODE || '%'; The whole query would be: QUERY_STR := 'select * from APP_FRAME_PROPERTIES,APP_FRAMES Where APP_FRAME_PROPERTIES.APP_EXT_CODE = APP_FRAMES.APP_EXT_CODE AND APP_FRAMES.APP_EXT_CODE LIKE ''%'' || :IN_APP_EXT_CODE || ''%'' ';


2

Your syntax appears to be for SQL Server, but you tagged the question for Oracle. In any case, a correct UPDATE query in Oracle should look something like this: UPDATE ORDERS SET ORDERDATE = ORDERDATE + INTERVAL '7' DAY WHERE ORDERDATE > SYSDATE - INTERVAL '7' DAY Here SYSDATE is a DATE object representing the current date and time.


2

Add this ORDER BY at the query's end: order by case name when 'Yaksha' then 1 when 'Arun' then 2 when 'Naveen' then 3 end (There's no other way to get that order. You need an ORDER BY to get a specific result set order.)


2

That isn't allowed. Per the documentation a using_index_clause can only be specified for unique or primary constraints. Best of luck.


2

I like a simpler approach: select replace( regexp_replace( replace('%ABC# \%ABC#','\%','~~') ,'%ABC#', 'XXX') ,'~~','\%') from dual; Note, however, that a regular expression is not needed in this particular case - this works just as well: select replace( replace( replace('%ABC# ...


2

REGEXP_COUNT() returns an integer, not a boolean. So, you need a comparison: select employee_name, LTRIM(street) from employee where regexp_count( street, '[[:digit:]]' ) > 1; If the comparison is just > 0, then you don't need to count the number of patterns. Just use regexp_like(). If you want to remove leading digits, use regexp_substr(): ...


2

If I understood your question correctly, the following should do what you want: select person_id, event_desc, event_type from ( select person_id, event_desc, event_type, row_number() over (partition by person_id order by idx desc) as rn from person_event_data ) t where rn = 1;


2

This is perfectly fine. Your transaction is in fact at redo. But since you didn't commit it the recover process rolled it back after reapplying it because it couldn't find a commit statement at the end of the redo stream. This is by design. The opposite would be a problem, if you had committed a statement, no matter what happened with the server (power loss, ...


1

You can do this using explicit string operations: select substr(col, 1, n) || string || substr(col, n+1) As a side note: This functionality is available in other databases: stuff() (in SQL Server) insert() (MySQL)


1

You need a subquery to remove the duplicates, something like; select id, listagg(name, ',') within group (order by name) as names from ( select id, name1 as name from your_table union select id, name2 as name from your_table union select id, name3 as name from your_table ) group by id The union will automatically remove duplicates from the ...


1

There may be an easier way to do it than this, but I think this would accomplish the end goal: with counts as ( select user_id, extract (year from time_read) as year_id, count (*) as cnt from Recipients group by user_id, extract (year from time_read) ), max_values as ( select user_id, year_id, cnt, max (cnt) over (partition ...


1

Give this a try: SELECT user_ID, count(user_ID) as cnt, EXTRACT(YEAR FROM time_read) as year FROM RECIPIENTS GROUP BY EXTRACT(YEAR FROM time_read), user_ID ORDER BY year ASC, cnt DESC


1

You can't use bind parameter like this in an "IN". Either you do : IN ((:p1, :p2), (:p3,:p4), (:p5,:p6)) But it assumes you know exactly how many items you have (in this case 3) or you "materialize" your parameters in the SQL string: String query = "select * from MYTABLE where (field1, field2) IN (('A', '1'), ('B', '2'), ('C', '3'))";


1

Just select them with the opposite aliases: SELECT "To" AS "From", "From" AS "To" FROM my_table BTW - "from" is a reserved word in SQL. Although it's possible to work around this (e.g., by using quotes), it's a poor choice for a column's name, and you should probably find a different one.


1

You're looking for this instead (.*[ae]){3,} The .* accepts differents chars between those wanted So your query becomes: select manager_name from manages where regexp_like(employee_name, '(.*[ae]){3,}', 'i'); The i flag is for insensitive match, so capital AE are taken into account to... If ommitted, sensitive match is performed... You can ...


1

If the list of values is dynamic or you just don't want to repeat the values you could use (or abuse, depending on your point of view) a table collection, and join your real table to a table collection expression instead of using IN: select your_table.name from table(sys.odcivarchar2list('Yaksha','Arun','Naveen')) t join your_table on your_table.name = ...


1

You can try with something like the following: SELECT * FROM test WHERE name IN ( 'Yaksha', 'Arun', 'Naveen' ) ORDER BY instr ( q'['Yaksha', 'Arun', 'Naveen']', name ) ASC This way could be useful if your IN list is somehow dynamic.


1

It may be a bit clunky, but you can create a custom ordering with a case expression: SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE name IN ('Yaksha', 'Arun','Naveen') ORDER BY CASE name WHEN 'Yaksha' THEN 1 WHEN 'Arun' THEN 2 WHEN 'Naveen' THEN 3 END ASC A slightly longer option, but one that prevents duplication ...


1

ORA-00904 tells you that name of a column is not valid. here are the rules: it can't be reserved oracle word; must begin with a letter; be less than or equal to thirty characters; consist only of alphanumeric and the special characters; as your column name start's with a number but not letter, you get this error


1

You need to split your string literal into two or more lines, to avoid the SQL*Plus command line limit (which is nothing to do with spooling). You can then concatenate the separate string literals together to get the output on a single line: select 'Field1,Field2,.........Field99' || 'Field101,Field102,.........Field199' || ...


1

You can create a Job using DBMS_SCHEDULER: BEGIN -- Job defined entirely by the CREATE JOB procedure. DBMS_SCHEDULER.create_job ( job_name => 'YourJobName', job_type => 'PLSQL_BLOCK', job_action => 'BEGIN NULL; /* Your code here*/ END;', start_date => SYSTIMESTAMP, // run the job as soon as possible ...


1

Best guess: By using individual SQL statements instead of PreparedStatement you force the driver to send all your statements (> 400k of character data) to the DB and the DB to parse all of that 400k characters which will hit a limit at some time and breaks things (Exception is not clear on where or what broke as it hides the causing Exception). How to fix: ...


1

You can maybe try with Update ORDERS SET ORDERDATE = ORDERDATE + 7 WHERE SYSDATE - ORDERDATE <= 7;


1

Hi You can use between e.g. truncate table DROPME_DATES_NAMES; drop table DROPME_DATES_NAMES; create table DROPME_DATES_NAMES (date_from date, date_to date, atr_name varchar2(30)); insert into DROPME_DATES_NAMES values (to_date('01-FEB-16','DD-MON-YYYY'), to_date('03-FEB-16','DD-MON-YYYY'), 'AAA '); insert into DROPME_DATES_NAMES values ...


1

You just have to use BETWEEN AND to check whether your date falls between one of those pair of dates. WITH your_table AS ( SELECT TO_DATE('01-FEB-16','DD-MON-RR') start_date, TO_DATE('03-FEB-16','DD-MON-RR') end_date, 'AAA' names FROM DUAL UNION SELECT TO_DATE('01-FEB-16','DD-MON-RR') start_date, TO_DATE('02-FEB-16','DD-MON-RR') end_date, 'BBB' names ...



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