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7

The problem is the concatenation character. However, I want to suggest a slightly different approach: select (upper(substr(last_name, 1, 1)) || substr(last_name, 2, len(last_name) - 2) || upper(substr(last_name, -1, 1)) ) In other words, avoid initcap(). The issue is unexpected side-effects. initcap() capitalizes the first letter ...


7

The ORDER BY in this context is in effect Oracle's proprietary syntax for generating an "ordered" row number on a (logically) unordered set of rows. This is a poorly designed feature in my opinion but the equivalent ISO standard SQL ROW_NUMBER() function (also valid in Oracle) may make it clearer what is happening: select * from ( select ROW_NUMBER() OVER ...


7

You can use a 'trick' with XML and XPath evaluation to do this without manually tokenising the string: select * from xmltable('3 + 6 + 13 + 0 + 1' columns result number path '.'); RESULT ---------- 23 Or: select to_number(xmlquery('3 + 6 + 13 + 0 + 1' returning content).getStringVal()) as result from dual; RESULT ---------- 23 ...


7

null is not a value, it's a lack thereof. You could think of it as an "unknown" value. So when adding any real value to an unknown value, the result would be unknown - or, in database terms, null. If you want to treat it as a zero, you'd have to do so explicitly, e.g., by using the coalesce function: SELECT (COALESCE(TBL5.FIELD1,0) + ...


6

I think you are looking for row_number(): select A.*, (case when a.count = 1 and row_number() over (partition by a.count, regid order by login desc) = 1 then 'rank1' else 'rank2' end) as rank from table A;


5

You are very close, you just need a little push in the right direction: SELECT COALESCE(a.ID, B.ID) As ID, a.Value1, b.Value2 FROM TableA a FULL OUTER JOIN TableB b ON a.ID=b.ID The COALESCE function returns the first parameter it gets that is not null. since this is a full outer join, a.id will be null on one row and b.id would be null on a different ...


5

The code you've shown doesn't get ORA-00933, but it still isn't valid: create type ids_t is table of number / create table test_table (client_id number, benefit_id number) / insert into test_table values (1, 1) / declare str_sql varchar2(4000); in_tbl_nme varchar2(30) := 'TEST_TABLE'; in_ids ids_t := ids_t(1, 2, 3); begin str_sql := 'CREATE TABLE ...


5

*Cause: A REFERENCES clause in a CREATE/ALTER TABLE statement gives a column-list for which there is no matching unique or primary key constraint in the referenced table. The problem is that EMP_ID (by itself) isn't a primary or unique key of table Employees, instead, you have a compound primary key (EMP_ID, EXPERT_ID). To fix the issue either make ...


5

The predicates look way more complicated than they need to be. Why wouldn't this return the result you are looking to return? WHERE CREATEDATE >= TRUNC(SYSDATE-1) AND CREATEDATE < TRUNC(SYSDATE) To explain that in "plain english", all three of the expressions returned by this SELECT statement: SELECT SYSDATE , TRUNC(SYSDATE) ...


5

If you look at the execution plans for the two queries, particularly the predicate information, you'll see that the first one does: --------------------------------------------------------------------------- | Id | Operation | Name | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time | ...


5

Just include the other characters within double quotes: select to_timestamp('2015/06/20T00:00:00','yyyy/mm/dd"T"hh24:mi.ss.ff') from dual


4

You can try with some dynamic SQL, by building a SQL statement based on sysdate: declare vSQL varchar2(32767); vPartitions varchar2(32767); begin select listagg('PARTITION TABLE_NAME_' || to_char(sysdate + level/24, 'yyyymmddhh24') || ' VALUES LESS THAN (TIMESTAMP''' || to_char(sysdate + (level+1)/24, ...


4

Maybe you need something like this: ... DECLARE vVersion varchar2(100); BEGIN /* get the version */ SELECT DISTINCT version into vVersion from PRODUCT_COMPONENT_VERSION; -- /* loop through users */ for i in ( select * from DBA_USERS_WITH_DEFPWD) loop /* print a different statement, based on vVersion, for the ...


4

In Oracle 11gR2 you can use LISTAGG to aggregate strings. WMSYS.WM_CONCAT is an undocumented feature that is not available in all Oracle installations (and is not available at all in Oracle 12c).


4

You can ORDER BY a group sum first, like this ORDER BY MAX(AMOUNT) OVER (PARTITION BY VOUCHER_NO) DESC, -- voucher with highest amount first VOUCHER_NO, -- all rows of that voucher CASE WHEN JOURNAL_TYPE = 'CREDIT' THEN 0 ELSE 1 END, -- credit first AMOUNT DESC


4

According to the documentation, Number(*,0) means you are working with very large integers, ie up to 38 digits and no decimal places: column_name NUMBER (precision, scale) ... precision (total number of digits) and scale (number of digits to the right of the decimal point): column_name NUMBER (*, scale) In this case, the precision is ...


4

You should be using declarative constraints for something like this, rather than triggers. I haven't worked with Oracle in a few years, but in SQL Server triggers can have big performance impacts, not to mention being more likely to cause bugs or let things slip through. For this particular case you could simply use: CONSTRAINT CHK_Reviews_rating CHECK ...


4

I am guessing that you are using Oracle and not MySQL, because it is case senstive by default. Just use the upper() or lower() functions: Select * from Account where lower(name) like '%chmidt%'; I would add an s if you want names like "Schmidt": Select a.* from Account a where lower(a.name) like '%schmidt%'; Note: This will find hammerschmidt and ...


4

In static SQL defined in an procedure, the identifiers (table names, column names) must be defined and available at compile time. To achieve what it looks like you are trying to achieve... dynamically specifying the table name in a SQL statement, you would have to use some form of "dynamic SQL". The old-school way of doing that in an Oracle procedure is to ...


4

You should avoid using the names of columns for your variables. Here is your code rewritten to do that. I also like aliases for tables as I feel it keeps queries with lots of joins shorter. DECLARE vRESTORE_ID NUMBER; vcounts NUMBER; BEGIN vRESTORE_ID := 100014; SELECT COUNT(te.UPDATE_ID) INTO vcounts FROM TB_ENT te WHERE te.UPDATE_ID = vRESTORE_ID; ...


4

In Oracle, quotes ('s) are used to denote string literals. Object names (such as tables) should not be surrounded by them. Lose the quotes and you should be OK: pst = (OraclePreparedStatement) con.prepareStatement ("select count(*) as num from " + tableName);


4

You should fix your data format. You are trying to store lists in a column, and that is a bad idea. You should be using a junction table rather than delimited values. Sometimes, we are stuck with other people's bad design decisions. Oracle does have powerful regular expression operators. This does allow: select name, job from table1 where ...


4

You're treating the PL/SQL variables as string literals; this: general_data_c like '%i_sub_no%' should be: general_data_c like '%' || i_sub_no || '%' I'm not sure quite what you're trying to do with: PART_DEP_ENT like 'CUSTOMER=i_cust_id' as there are no wild cards and the construct looks odd anyway; you might want: PART_DEP_ENT = 'CUSTOMER=' || ...


4

For your examples, you can just use replace(): replace(recp_co_nm_clean, '''', '')


4

You need to set the Connection property on your OracleCommand to use your obj_Conn connection, or use the relevant constructor. _commandInvoice.Connection = obj_Conn;


4

The rules for name resolution are described in the documentation. When you run your query against sys.dba_objects you are directly accessing the SYS-owned view called dba_objects. When you run your query against the unqualified dba_objects then you may access a table or view that you own, or an object you or someone else owns, through a private synonym ...


4

You can use listagg() if you are using Oracle 11G or higher like SELECT COLUMN_1, LISTAGG(COLUMN_2, '|') WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY COLUMN_2) "ListValues" FROM table1 GROUP BY COLUMN_1 Else, see this link for an alternative for lower versions Oracle equivalent of MySQL group_concat


4

One approach is to do a left outer join to your filter-subquery, and then select all the rows where the join either failed (meaning that the subquery returned no rows) or succeeded and had the right value: SELECT personTbl.* FROM personTbl LEFT OUTER JOIN ( SELECT DISTINCT filterValue FROM filterTable WHERE filterType = 'name' ...


4

The error you're getting is being thrown by the PL/SQL compiler when it tries to compile the statement insert into foobaz select 1 from dual because of course the foobaz table doesn't exist. In-line SQL statements have to be valid at compile time, and thus the compiler throws an exception. To get around this you'll have to use dynamic SQL, as in: ...


4

There is a cost associated to having an index: it takes up disk space it slows down updates (index needs to be updated as well) it makes query planning more complex (slightly slower, but more importantly increased potential for bad decisions) These costs are supposed to be offset by the benefit of more efficient query processing (faster, fewer I/O). If ...



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