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44

What gets returned is the return value of executing this command. What you see in while executing it directly is the output of the command in stdout. That 0 is returned means, there was no error in execution. Use popen etc for capturing the output . Some thing along this line: import subprocess as sub p = sub.Popen('your ...


36

This: from sys import platform as _platform if _platform == "linux" or _platform == "linux2": # linux elif _platform == "darwin": # OS X elif _platform == "win32": # Windows...


18

You should use the subprocess module using which you can control the stdout and stderr in a flexible fashion. os.system is deprecated. The subprocess module allows you to create an object which represents a running external process. You can read it from it's stdout/stderr, write to it's stdin, send it signals, terminate it etc. The main object in the ...


18

Avoid os.system() by all means, and use subprocess instead: with open(os.devnull, 'wb') as devnull: subprocess.check_call(['/etc/init.d/apache2', 'restart'], stdout=devnull, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT) This is the subprocess equivalent of the /etc/init.d/apache2 restart &> /dev/null.


17

If all you need is the stdout output, then take a look at subprocess.check_output() (added in Python 2.7): import subprocess batcmd="dir" result = subprocess.check_output(batcmd, shell=True) Because you were using os.system(), you'd have to set shell=True to get the same behaviour. You do want to heed the big red warning message about passing untrusted ...


10

You could consider running the program via subprocess.Popen, with subprocess.PIPE communication, and then shove that output where ever you would like, but as is, os.system just runs the command, and nothing else. from subprocess import Popen, PIPE p = Popen(['command', 'and', 'args'], stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE, stdin=PIPE) output = p.stdout.read() ...


9

I'm not sure, but I think the subprocess module with its Popen is much more flexible than os.popen. If I recall correctly it includes asynchronous process spawning, which I think is what you're looking for. Edit: It's been a while since I used the subprocess module, but if I'm not mistaken, subprocess.Popen returns immediately, and only when you try to ...


8

If you're only interested in the output from the process, it's easiest to use subprocess' check_output function: output = subprocess.check_output(["command", "arg1", "arg2"]); Then output holds the program output to stdout. Check the link above for more info.


8

Are you sure that the log file is even created? I cannot see where this name is mentionned - but maybe it is created by default. Are you asked for the password by sudo? This could tell you if sudo is really run. os.system is kind of deprecated or at least frowned upon; better use subprocess.call(), subprocess.check_call() or subprocess.Popen() (gives you an ...


8

This is because adduser and useradd are two different programs. The former asks interactive questions, the latter doesn't. If you want the interactive prompts, call adduser, and use subprocess.call() to do so.


8

If you want to have an exception thrown when the command doesn't exist, you should use subprocess: import subprocess try: subprocess.call(['wrongcommand']) except OSError: print ('wrongcommand does not exist') Come to think of it, you should probably use subprocess instead of os.system anyway ...


7

What made you think os.system would use csh? It uses standard C function system, that on Unix system will call just basic /bin/sh. This will not be csh, but most probably bash, or some simpler version of it. BTW: note that what you do with shell environment in os.system will not affect subsequent calls to os.system, because each is run in different ...


7

From Dive into Python: import urllib sock = urllib.urlopen("http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Python_(programming_language)") htmlsource = sock.read() sock.close() print htmlsource That will print out the source code for the Python Wikipedia article. I suggest you take a look at Dive into Python for more details. Example using urllib2 from the Python ...


7

You can get a pretty coarse idea of the OS you're using by checking sys.platform. Once you have that information you can use it to determine if calling something like os.uname() is appropriate to gather more specific information. You could also use something like Python System Information on unix-like OSes, or pywin32 for Windows. There's also psutil if ...


7

os.system doesn't returns the output, use subprocess.check_output for that.


6

The first thing I'd try is to use shutil.copyfile() instead of an external program to copy the file. If you have to use an external program, you should call it via subprocess.Popen(), not via os.system(). You can use the Popen.wait() to wait for the subprocess to finish.


6

os.startfile() as mentioned by Bradley (+1), but make sure to pass a Unicode string in, and not a byte string. Windows NT filenames are natively Unicode, and Python on Windows has (unlike most other scripting languages) specific support built in for passing Unicode-strings into APIs that expect filenames: os.startfile(u'Hello \u05e2\u05d5\u05dc\u05dd.xls') ...


6

There are several problems with the following line: os.system("C:\Users\Oulton\ 7z e C:\Users\Oulton\install.zip ") Since your string contains backslashes, you should use a raw string: os.system(r"C:\Users\Oulton\7z -e C:\Users\Oulton\install.zip") (note the r before the first double quote.) I've also removed the extraneous spaces. The first one ...


6

os.system ('/%s/tabix -h -f ftp://<some_url> 4:387-388 > file.out' % (path)) You need to have the format arguments at the end of the string. Not in between two strings.


6

You're not stripping trailing newlines from the lines you read from the file. As a result, you are passing to os.system a string like "whois -h whois.arin.net + a.b.c.d\n | grep Country". The shell parses the string as two commands and complains of "unexpected token |" at the beginning of the second one. This explains why there is no error when you use a ...


6

You want os.stat (specifically the st_nlink attribute). Edit: To paraphrase jwz: Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll parse the output of ls -l." Now they have two problems.


6

Don't use os.system(); subprocess is definitely the way to go. Your problem though is that you expect Python to understand that you want to interpolate args.fileread into a string. As great as Python is, it is not able to read your mind like that! Use string formatting instead: os.system("rtl2gds -rtl={args.fileread} -rtl_top={args.module_name} ...


5

On a unix system, you can redirect stderr and stdout to /dev/null as part of the command itself. os.system(cmd + "> /dev/null 2>&1")


5

depending on your os (and that's why as Noufal said, you should use subproscess instead) you can try something like os.system("/etc/init.d/apache restard > /dev/null") or (to mute also the error) os.system("/etc/init.d/apache restard > /dev/null 2>&1")


5

Instead of subprocess.call(['/usr/local/bin/growlnotify', '-n emesene', '-a emesene', '-t ""+title+"""', '-m """+text+"""""'], shell=True) use subprocess.call(['/usr/local/bin/growlnotify', '-n', 'emesene', '-a', 'emesene', '-t', title, '-m', text], shell=True) Everywhere you have an unquoted space in the shell command, split another list item. The ...


5

Normally, os.system() returns when the child process is finished. So there is indeed nothing for os.wait() to do. It is equivalent to subprocess.call(). Use subprocess.Popen() to create background processes, and then the wait() or poll() methods of the Popen objects to wait for them to quit. By default, Popen does not spawn a shell but executes the program ...


5

I am pretty certain you are doing something else different; the triple quoting isn't making a difference here at all: >>> a = r"sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/" >>> b = r"""sudo scp -i /home/backup/.ssh/id_rsa /opt/backups/*conf backup@a-hostname.local:/opt/backups/""" ...


5

os.system does wait. But there could be an error in the program called by it, so the file isn't created. You should check the return value of the called program before proceeding. In general, programs are supposed to return 0 when they finish normally, and another value when there is an error: if os.system(str(cline)): raise RuntimeError('program {} ...


5

os.system isn't doing any such thing; what is happening is that uptime itself is writing to stdout (real stdout, not Python's sys.stdout), and os.system is returning the return value of uptime, which is 0 (indicating it exited successfully). If you want to access the string uptime prints to stdout within Python, you'll have to use some other way of calling ...


5

use the source Luke: http://hg.python.org/cpython/file/2.7/Lib/shutil.py it actually does neither. if you follow the code, it ends up opening a new file descriptor and writing buffered bytes to it. like this: while 1: buf = fsrc.read(length) if not buf: break fdst.write(buf)



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