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73

Should I just start with a few gen_servers with a supervisor and incrementally build on that? You're missing one key component in Erlang architectures here: applications! (That is, the concept of OTP applications, not software applications). Think of applications as components. A component in your system solves a particular problem, is responsible for a ...


34

Learn and play with pure Erlang. Build systems in Erlang/OTP.


32

can it be done with pure Erlang? Yes, it can, subject to the analogue of Greenspun's Tenth Rule: your system will contain an ad hoc, informally-specified, bug-ridden, slow implementation of half of OTP.


24

Use timer:send_interval/2. E.g.: -behavior(gen_server). interval_milliseconds()-> 15000. init()-> timer:send_interval(interval_milliseconds(), interval), {ok, FascinatingStateData}. %% this clause will be called every 15 seconds handle_info(interval, StateData)-> State2 = do_some_work(StateData) {noreply, State2}.


22

This works fine for me: 1> application:start(inets). ok 2> application:start(ssl). ok 3> http:request(head, {"https://example.com", []}, [{ssl,[{verify,0}]}], []). {ok,{{"HTTP/1.1",200,"OK"}, [{"cache-control","max-age=0, proxy-revalidate"}, {"date","Sun, 23 May 2010 00:38:33 GMT"}, {"server","BAIDA/1.0.0"}, ...


21

Check out rebar: https://github.com/basho/rebar used for packaging, templating and managing releases of Erlang/OTP applications. You will find there an entire tutorial on how to use it.Check out this tutorial on OTP first, before you can switch to this one which shows you releases and how they are handled in Erlang. Use this entire book as reference as you ...


19

This is actually a kind of race condition. As you might know, the Erlang shell itself is a normal Erlang process. When you start your supervisor from the shell, the supervisor is linked to the shell (because you use supervisor:start_link/3). When you call your gen_server process, that process crashes (and is correctly restarted by the supervisor, as you ...


15

Yes, you should Generate a unique random reset password. See e.g. this answer. Store it in the database (possibly with an expiry time) Send e-mail to the user with the reset password. User visits the reset password page with the reset password in the query string. Check the database to see the user associated with the reset password and if the expiry time ...


15

No, a process never inherits any state set by a previous process. A supervisor will only restart the process with the same arguments used to start it in the first place. If you want to recover state, you should make sure that such state is saved in a persistent manner (ETS tables, file on disk, database etc).


14

Q1 > What an Erlang/OTP beginner should know about behaviours? Is it possible to describe and understand the notion of OTP behaviour in a nutshell? Ans :: A behaviour is usually used in code so that the compiler can generate more intuitive error messages depending upon its behaviour i.e application/supervisor/gen_server/gen_event/gen_fsm. It enables the ...


14

OTP is a battle-hardened set of design elements and idioms used in the creation of, as Jonas said, fault-tolerant systems among other things (like flexibility, live updates, etc.). In brief you want to use it for these environments, or environments that may grow into these, because a lot of the blood, sweat and tears of creating reliable, stable systems in ...


14

Let M be an Erlang term() which is a message we send around in the system. One obvious way to handle M is to build a pipeline of processes and queues. M is processed by the first worker in the pipeline and then sent on to the next queue. It is then picked up by the next worker process, processed again and put into a queue. And so on until the message has ...


14

According to "Programming Erlang", ~n outputs the platform-specific new line sequence (\n on Unix, \r\n on Windows, etc.). I think \n just writes the \n character, but am not sure.


13

OTP is written in Erlang so it definitely can be done in pure Erlang. That being said OTP provides you with a lot of useful functionality which you would otherwise need to write yourself. @Alexey is right than you will end up implementing a portion of OTP along the way. The problem is that the framework you need for building fault-tolerant systems, which OTP ...


13

The problem testing supervisors from the shell is that the supervisor process is linked to the shell process. When gen_server process crashes the exit signal is propagated up to the shell which crashes and get restarted. To avoid the problem add something like this to the supervisor: start_in_shell_for_testing() -> {ok, Pid} = ...


13

See modules pg2 and pool. pg2 implements quite simple distributed process pool. pg2:get_closest_pid/1 returns "closest" pid, i.e. random local process if available, otherwise random remote process. pool implements load balancing between nodes started with module slave.


12

Fault-tolerance and scalability is the main advantages of using processes vs. threads. A system that relies on shared memory or some other kind of technology only available when using threads, will be useless you want to run the system on multiple machines. Sooner or later you need to communicate between different processes. Using processes you are forced ...


12

Rather than try to address your specific questions as other answers have already done, I'll try to explain in simple terms the basics behind behaviors, and let you answer your own questions based on understanding those basics. A behavior is basically a message handling framework, where by "framework" I mean the classical definition of a partial solution to ...


11

There's a pool(3) facility: pool can be used to run a set of Erlang nodes as a pool of computational processors. It is organized as a master and a set of slave nodes.. pool:start/1,2 starts a new pool. The file .hosts.erlang is read to find host names where the pool nodes can be started. The slave nodes are started with ...


11

I apologize if I got your question wrong. A couple of suggestions that I can make to guide you in a right direction (or what I consider being a right direction :) 1 (Rather minor, but still important) I suggest getting inets startup code out of that worker and putting it in application statup code (appname_app.erl). As far as I can tell you're using rebar ...


11

I dug some more and found the answer to my own question. There is an optional fourth argument in message handler "Result"s that you can use which is a timeout. so: some_fsm_state({set, Val}, State) -> NewState = do(Val, State), {next_state, another_fsm_state, NewState, 5000}; another_fsm_state(timeout, State) -> handle_timeout(State). ...


11

The data is hidden in the process dictionary (of any process spawned with proc_lib) under the entry '$ancestors': 1> proc_lib:spawn(fun() -> timer:sleep(infinity) end). <0.33.0> 2> i(0,33,0). [{current_function,{timer,sleep,1}}, {initial_call,{proc_lib,init_p,3}}, {status,waiting}, {message_queue_len,0}, {messages,[]}, {links,[]}, ...


10

I did some research, and below is what I have. First, this is a sample callback module of a supervisor: -module(root_sup). -behaviour(supervisor). -export([start_link/0]). -export([init/1]). start_link() -> {ok, Pid} = supervisor:start_link({local, ?MODULE}, ?MODULE, []), {ok, Pid}. init(_Args) -> RestartStrategy = ...


10

The current state of an Erlang behavior is not saved anywhere. You would have to take care of that yourself. Either you save the state regurlarly somewhere externally (in another process, in an ETS table, a database etc.) or you make sure that your init/1 function is sufficiently smart and dynamic to be able to recreate the state upon starting (recover ...


9

Root supervisor -module(root_sup). -behaviour(supervisor). -export([start_link/0]). -export([init/1, shutdown/0]). start_link() -> supervisor:start_link({local,?MODULE}, ?MODULE, []). init(_Args) -> RestartStrategy = {one_for_one, 10, 60}, ListenerSup = {popd_listener_sup, {popd_listener_sup, start_link, []}, ...


9

A bit more low level that pool is the slave(3) module. Pool builds upon the functionality in slave. Use slave:start to start a new slave. You should probably also specify -rsh ssh on the command-line. So use pool if you need the kind of functionality it offers, if you need something different you can build it yourself out of slave.


9

You use OTP/gen_servers for processes which are under a restart strategy - that is the restart of them is in your control. That is not the case with processes representing connections to web browsers. If that process dies there is no way for the server to restart it - therefore running it under OTP is pointless. Mochiweb (and Yaws) both use gen_servers to ...


9

I guess according to Occam's razor there is no need for this gen_server to exist, especially since there is absolutely no state stored in it. Such process could be needed in situations when you need access to the table (or any other resource) to be strictly sequential (for example you might want to avoid any aborted transactions at cost of a bottleneck). ...


9

As already mentioned Yaws or Mochiweb are a great way to go but if you'd like a dead simple way to get your RESTful API done quickly and correctly then use Webmachine. It's a layer on top of Mochiweb that implements proper HTTP behavior based on Alan Dean's amazing HTTP flow diagram and makes it easy to get REST done right. I'm using it right now to expose ...


9

I've recently used gproc to implement pubsub. The example from the readme does the trick. subscribe(EventType) -> %% Gproc notation: {p, l, Name} means {(p)roperty, (l)ocal, Name} gproc:reg({p, l, {?MODULE, EventType}}). notify(EventType, Msg) -> Key = {?MODULE, EventType}, gproc:send({p, l, Key}, {self(), Key, Msg}).



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