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416

ref tells the compiler that the object is initialized before entering the function, while out tells the compiler that the object will be initialized inside the function. So while ref is two-ways, out is out-only.


125

For 'out', the following seems to work for me. public interface IService { void DoIt(out string a); } [TestMethod] public void Test() { var service = new Mock<IService>(); var expectedValue = "value"; service.Setup(s => s.DoIt(out expectedValue)); string actualValue; service.Object.DoIt(out actualValue); ...


104

ref means that value is already set, method can read it and can modify it. out means that value isn't set and method must set it before return and couldn't read before setting value.


72

A much easier way to do this is with the STL copy algorithm: #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> // for copy #include <iterator> // for ostream_iterator #include <vector> int main() { /* Set up vector to hold chars a-z */ std::vector<char> path; for (int ch = 'a'; ch <= 'z'; ++ch) ...


48

Cath, Let's say Dom shows up at Peter's cubicle about the memo about the TPS reports. If Dom were a ref argument, he would have a printed copy of the memo. If Dom were an out argument, he'd make Peter print a new copy of the memo for him to take with him.


39

They each have their pros and cons. Out parameters are fast and cheap but require that you pass in a variable, and rely upon mutation. It is almost impossible to correctly use an out parameter with LINQ. Tuples make collection pressure and are un-self-documenting. "Item1" is not very descriptive. Custom structs can be slow to copy if they are large, but ...


30

Purely to answer your question, as far as I know you use an iterator: std::vector<char> path; // ... for( std::vector<char>::const_iterator i = path.begin(); i != path.end(); ++i) std::cout << *i << ' '; If you want to modify the vector's contents in the for loop, then use iterator rather than const_iterator. Note that this ...


27

It means you know what you're doing - that you're acknowledging it's an out parameter. Do you really want the utterly different behaviour to happen silently? The same is true for ref, by the way. (You can also overload based on by-value vs out/ref, but I wouldn't recommend it.) Basically, if you've got an (uncaptured) local variable and you use it as a ...


26

C# iterators are state machines internally. Every time you yield return something, the place where you left off should be saved along with the state of local variables so that you could get back and continue from there. To hold this state, C# compiler creates a class to hold local variables and the place it should continue from. It's not possible to have a ...


24

I doubt that you'll find any significant performance penalty to using an out parameter. You've got to get information back to the caller somehow or other - out is just a different way of doing it. You may find there's some penalty if you use the out parameter extensively within the method, as it may well mean an extra level of redirection for each access. ...


23

In C++11 you can now use a range-based for loop: for (auto c : path) std::cout << c << ' ';


21

I am going to try my hand at an explanation: I think we understand how the value types work right? Value types are (int, long, struct etc.). When you send them in to a function without a ref command it COPIES the data. Anything you do to that data in the function only affects the copy, not the original. The ref command sends the ACTUAL data and any ...


20

Unfortunately you are required to pass something because the method is required to set it. So you cannot send null because the method, being required to set it, would blow up. One approach to hide the ugliness would be to wrap the method in another method that does the out parameter for you like so: String Other_MakeMyCall(String inputParams) { String ...


19

List<T> is a reference type (class), so no ? is required. Just assign null to ExClass parameter in method body.


19

This is documentation from Moq site: // out arguments var outString = "ack"; // TryParse will return true, and the out argument will return "ack", lazy evaluated mock.Setup(foo => foo.TryParse("ping", out outString)).Returns(true); // ref arguments var instance = new Bar(); // Only matches if the ref argument to the invocation is the same instance ...


17

Actually Func is just a simple delegate declared in the .NET Framework. Actually there are several Func delegates declared there: delegate TResult Func<TResult>() delegate TResult Func<T, TResult>(T obj) delegate TResult Func<T1, T2, TResult>(T1 obj1, T2 obj2) delegate TResult Func<T1, T2, T3, TResult>(T1 obj1, T2 obj2, T3 obj3) ...


17

Out is good when you have a TryNNN function and it's clear that the out-parameter will always be set even if the function does not succeed. This allows you rely on the fact that the local variable you declare will be set rather than having to place checks later in your code against null. (A comment below indicates that the parameter could be set to null, so ...


17

Avner Kashtan provides an extension method in his blog which allows setting the out parameter from a callback: Moq, Callbacks and Out parameters: a particularly tricky edge case The solution is both elegant and hacky. Elegant in that it provides a fluent syntax that feels at-home with other Moq callbacks. And hacky because it relies on calling some internal ...


16

You can construct a string to contain a number of repitions of a character: std::cout << std::string(level, '-') << root->value << std::endl;


16

C doesn't support passing by reference; that's a C++ feature. You'll have to pass pointers instead. void swap(int *first, int *second){ int temp = *first; *first = *second; *second = temp; } int a=3,b=2; swap(&a,&b);


15

Pretty much, that is an aspect of what out means; firstly, note that out doesn't really exist - we only really need to consider ref (out is just ref with some "definite assignment" tweaks at the compiler). ref means "pass the address of this" - if we change the value via the address, then that shows immediately - it is, after all, updating the memory on the ...


15

Seems like it is not possible out of the box. Looks like someone attempted a solution See this forum post http://code.google.com/p/moq/issues/detail?id=176 this question http://stackoverflow.com/questions/726630/verify-value-of-reference-parameter-with-moq


14

You have to declare a variable which you will then ignore. This is most commonly the case with the TryParse (or TryWhatever) pattern, when it is used to test the validity of user input (e.g. can it be parsed as a number?) without caring about the actual parsed value. You used the word "dispose" in the question, which I suspect was just unfortunate - but if ...


14

ref is in and out. You should use out in preference wherever it suffices for your requirements.


14

You would never combine ref and out on 1 parameter. They both mean 'pass by reference'. You can of course combine ref parameters and out parameters in one method. The difference between ref and out lies mainly in intent. ref signals 2-way data transport, out means 1-way. But besides intent, the C# compiler tracks definite-assignment and that makes the ...


14

Wont changes in the callee function be reflected in the caller function? Changes to the contents of the array would be reflected in the caller method - but changes to the parameter itself wouldn't be. So for example: public void Foo(int[] x) { // The effect of this line is visible to the caller x[0] = 10; // This line is pointless x = ...


13

For ref Keyword Its already mentioned on MSDN that : Do not confuse the concept of passing by reference with the concept of reference types. The two concepts are not the same. A method parameter can be modified by ref regardless of whether it is a value type or a reference type. There is no boxing of a value type when it is passed by reference. As for ...


12

If you want to return both an iterator and an int from your method, a workaround is this: public class Bar : IFoo { public IEnumerable<int> GetItems( ref int somethingElse ) { somethingElse = 42; return GetItemsCore(); } private IEnumerable<int> GetItemsCore(); { yield return 7; } } You should ...


11

A good use of out instead of return for the result is the Try pattern that you can see in certain APIs, for example Int32.TryParse(...). In this pattern, the return value is used to signal success or failure of the operation (as opposed to an exception), and the out parameter is used to return the actual result. One of the advantages with respect to ...


10

The method is fine, but you need to do something in the case that an Exception happens, since you don't re-throw. That means you could exit the method (after an exception in ChangeType) without giving it a value. In this case, maybe: catch { parsedValue = default(T); page.Response.RedirectPermanent(RedirectUrl); }



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