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17

When your library allocates memory from the OS, the OS will just reserve an address range in the process's virtual address space. There's no reason for the OS to actually provide this memory until you use it - as you demonstrated. If you look at e.g. /proc/self/maps you'll see the address range. If you look at top's memory use you won't see it - you're not ...


8

Please look up for overcommit. Linux by default doesn't reserve memory until it is accessed. And if you end up by needing more memory than available, you don't get an error but a random process is killed. You can control this behavior with /proc/sys/vm/*. IMO, overcommit should be a per process setting, not a global one. And the default should be no ...


2

About the second half of your question: The language standard doesn't allow any delays in throwing a bad_alloc. That must happen as an alternative to new[] returning a pointer. It cannot happen later! Some OSs might try to overcommit memory allocations, and fail later. That is not conforming to the C++ language standard.


2

No, it's not possible. Somewhat related, for a realtime process you probably want to use the mlock or mlockall functions to pin your address space to RAM.


1

You can set max memory size, data seg size, stack size and virtual memory with the ulimit (a bash builtin command). Some limits may not be honoured, it's system specific.


1

Generally No. Many programs depend on allocating huge amounts of memory that is not really used. E.g. Java doesn't work very well with overcommit disabled. In some cases, e.g. with dedicated PostgreSQL server it is better that the kernel refuses allocations in time instead of OOM killing the server later and stopping the service. Use strict overcommit mode ...


1

If you're not using the page (reading or writing to it), it won't be commited to your address space (only reserved). But your address space is limited, so you can't play as you want/like with it. See for example ElectricFence which may fail for large number of allocations, because of insertion of "nul page/guard page" (anonymous memory with no access). ...


1

On Linux, assuming overcommit has not been disabled, you can use the MAP_NORESERVE flag to mmap, which will ensure that the page in question will not be accounted as allocated memory prior to being accessed. If overcommit has been completely disabled, see below about multiple-mapping pages. Note that Linux's behavior for zero pages has changed at times in ...



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