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6

I think you want to use the Collections. unmodifiableList() method on your Stack to achieve the desired results.


3

A stack is a "last-in-first-out" data structure. Note how this is defined in terms of mutability (adding and removing items) - i.e. stack is mutable by definition. The fastest immutable collection you can get is probably ArrayList wrapped by Collections.unmodifiableList().


3

You're misunderstanding the purpose of the final keyword. It just makes a reference non-reassignable. It has nothing to do with const-correctness which you may be familair with from other languages. ­1. How to get immutable Stack data structure? Can I box it with list? As Sugerman mentioned, if you want an immutable view of your stack, wrap it using ...


3

You should throw exception in exceptional cases. i.e. when something unexpected happens. If you expect a function to regularly throw an exception that's most likely bad design. In your examples it is very clear that TryParse is better since the exception seems to occor often. But for example when parsing a file, I expect it to be almost always valid. So I ...


3

are there more types of overuse? Yes ... overuse of dogmatism. You need to develop a balanced understanding of when it is appropriate to use these constructs (statics, fields, methods, classes, interfaces etc), and when it is not appropriate. Simply trying to avoid the use of some construct is plainly wrong-headed. For example, but static fields have ...


2

In case of Parse()/TryParse() it's better don't wait for exception, use TryParse and act on incorrect input by yourself.


2

Exceptions should be used for exceptional behavior, not for flow-control. A basic guideline would be that if normal program flow regularly runs into exceptions you're doing something wrong. However, it is important to notice that just having a try { } catch { } present will itself not affect performance negatively. Only when an exception is actually thrown ...


1

Another point that hasn't been examined in depth so far is that Exceptions have a cost. They subvert the normal flow of control in the program and there is some resource use as a result. A simple test would be to write a program that loops over your original float.Parse code with some invalid data, and compare how long it takes to run versus the TryParse ...


1

Programs that use exceptions as part of their normal processing suffer from all the readability and maintainability problems of classic spaghetti code. — Andy Hunt and Dave Thomas I think there is no simple right answer about how/when to use exceptions. It depends on an architecture of the application you're working on and other factors. ...


1

The Observer pattern is only useful when it reduces coupling. I don't see any reduction of coupling in this example so I would say it is overuse.


1

I agree w/ @Pace, definitely doesn't reduce coupling, definitely overuse. My question is that in your example, the simplest approach semas to be to have the Order cancel its own LineItems when you cancel it; is there a good reason not to do that for your app?


1

To extend what I was saying, there is no point in abusing mutable for this. If this is all you want to prevent: *p = /* ... */; then it can be done much more easily by deleting the assignment operator of Counter: class Counter { void operator=(const Counter&) = delete; // ... }; Remember that the assignment operator does not affect the ...


1

"Just because you can, doesn't mean you should!" If you're going to do or not do something in code (e.g. static fields, private accessors, interfaces) I think the simplest answer is have a good reason for taking that stance. Following "rules" blindly is a mistake, and often creates a maintainance nightmare if no-one is brave enough to change the code. ...



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