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3

There is at this moment no standardized way to retrieve hostname/portnumber of a CORBA client, the reason is that CORBA is not tied to just sockets, there could be multiple kinds of transports which have completely different ways for addressing. Some ORBs do have some extension to make this possible, for example TAO has a TransportCurrent feature that does ...


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I don't fully understand how each node acquires a globally unique ID though. I'd say that's not really relevant to the title of your question and implementation-specific anyway. But generally it's either done at random or based on a hash of their public IP + some random sub-part modulo some adjustments for subnets. Have a look at bittorrent's secure ...


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In general: Kademlia and Chord are just abstract designs, while implementations provide varying functionality. If its feature-set is too narrow you won't be able to map your application logic onto it. If it's overly broad for your needs it might be a pain to re-implement if no open source library is available. For bittorrent: The bittorrent DHT provides ...


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To write binary data you should open the file using the file mode 'wb' (write binary). i.e.: f = open(join(self.dirname, query), 'wb')


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As long as your query method supports binary, try 'wb' instead of 'w'.


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must be the usual problem with callbacks inside for loop, try binding the value of i: for (var i = 0; i<list.length - 1; i++) { pc[list[i]] = createPC(list[i]); (function(i){ pc[list[i]].createOffer(function (localDesc) { pc[list[i]].setLocalDescription(localDesc); send(localDesc, list[i]); }, doNothing, ...


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Every answer here seems to have a different interpretation of the question, or rather, a different assumed purpose of the encryption. Since you compare it to https, it seems like a reasonable assumption is that you're looking for authentication and confidentiality. I'll enumerate a few attempts in decreasing level of "security". This is a bittorrent centric ...


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I thought ice candidates were people who have opened a window Nope, that's where you're wrong. The ICE protocol is trying to establish a direct network connection between the two peers. This is a hard problem. There are many problems in regular networking topology to work around and many possible routes a direct connection could take. The ICE protocol ...


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A DHT in general is just an distributed algorithm. Specific implementations deal differently with node failures. Put requests generally are done with some level of redundancy. Additionally the target nodes may replicate data among themselves or the originating node may periodically refresh the stored data. In a fully decentralized p2p environment where you ...


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Jingle is a negotiation mechanism, and there are a couple of different transports it could negotiate for file transfer. The most common transport is peer to peer bytestreams defined in http://xmpp.org/extensions/xep-0260.html - here the only traffic you'd see via the server would be the jingle negotiation, which is a similar sort of volume to other XMPP ...


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But, why does it have to hash the filename? It doesn't have to be a filename. It can hash other things too. E.g. file contents. Or metadata. Or cryptographic keys used as identities of users in the network. Couldn't it just work like a dictionary, so instead of having a node hold hash values between 0000 and 0a2d, it would hold filename values ...


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Here you can find the example of android direct file sharing over wifi network Click here


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You are currently looking at security implementations. If you don't understand the security model & cryptography behind these libraries, your solution will - to a high certainty - not be secure. Artjom is correct in indicating that for peer to peer encryption you most likely need authentication of both parties. That is not provided by normal SSL/TLS, ...


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Skype detects if a peer is directly reachable using public IP address or NAT traversal techniques. If the peer is not directly reachable, it uses relaying mechanism using another peer which can directly connect to the unreachable peer. Skype also displays its performing a relaying while doing a file transfer when the peer is not directly reachable.


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Just a note for those following this great post, notice that in the server side, the second UDP packet received is announced as: System.out.println("(2nd) Server received:" + new String(bytes) + " from " + address1 + " on port " + port1); It should be System.out.println("(2nd) Server received:" + new String(bytes) + " from " + address2 + " on port " + ...


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It's certainly possible to forward an incoming stream from one RTCPeerConnection to another. Here's an example: http://googlechrome.github.io/webrtc/samples/web/content/peerconnection/multiple-relay/ However, you don't get low-level access to the frames in this scenario, and the content will be decoded and re-encoded instead of being passed through as-is.


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Not sure what you mean by "not work". To test the connectivity between your client and your server (sit behind NAT), you just need do something like "telnet mIP mBindport" on your client side, assuming you have a telnet utility (default on Linux and Mac, you can install one, like nc ("netcat") on your windows). If the port forwarding is set up correctly, ...


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Teamviewer, Skype & similar P2P application uses UDP hole punching mechanism to do IPv4 NAT traversal. This makes the P2P application possible. But this kind of hole punching doesn't work if UDP is disabled or the NAT router is symmetric. All P2P mechanism falls back to intermediate server proxy approach if the network doesn't support hole punching. If ...


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This would mean sending patches, through for instance email. See "Git Tip of the Week: Patches by Email" One way of getting changes is by providing a patch, or a set of changes which can be applied to a remote repository at the other end. Git started life as a distributed version control system for the Linux project, which actively uses mail lists ...


2

This isn't possible through Web Sockets today. However, you can use WebRTC which has robust methods of establishing a peer to peer connection. WebRTC is typically used for video conferencing applications, but a data channel is set up as well. I haven't used it yet myself, but it's my understanding that the API is the same as it is for Web Sockets. There ...


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Based on my experience, you can do communicate client to client using Channels. This will only work if they're on the same Network, same subnet and have multicast enabled.


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These are two completely different terms. P2P means "Peer-to-Peer", which is connection between two or more subjects, which does not require any other authority (server, host) to be functional. Datagram is, let me use wikipedia :a basic transfer unit associated with a packet-switched network in which the delivery, arrival time, and order of arrival are not ...


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Given your conceptual outline, I think there is an issue at point 4. Although A punches a hole through its own NAT, when B attempts to reach this hole it is unaware of the port on A's NAT (or more correctly/commonly - NAPT) and hence A's NAT drops the packet when B attempts to communicate.


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You seem lost, and I used to do research in this area, so I'll take a shot. I feel this question is borderline off-topic, but I tend to error toward leaving things open. See the P2P networks Chord, CAN, Tapestry, and Pastry for examples of P2P networks as well as psuedo-code. These works are all based off distributed hash tables (DHTs) and have been ...


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It looks like its the bound_addr pj_sockaddr in the pj_stun_sock_cfg struct. According to the docs, "If the port is set to zero, the socket will bind at any port (chosen by the OS)."


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I'm guessing that the administrative nodes are different from normal nodes by being able to tell other nodes what to do (and the regular nodes should obey). You have to give the admin nodes some kind of way to prove themselves that can be verified by other nodes but not forged by them (like a policeman's ID). The Most standard way I can think of is by using ...


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Open Garden is developing this sort of technology and implement it in their app, Firechat. Testing the app, we found that Android-to-Android connections worked only over Bluetooth, iPhone-to-iPhone worked with bluetooth or wifi, and Android-to-iPhone only works if the phones are connected to the same network. Here's a link to their sdk which should be out ...


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One way you could avoid this is to only use reliable nodes for storing and retrieving values. The reliability of a node will have to be computed by known-good nodes, and it could be something like the similarity of a node's last few computed ranking factors compared to the same ranking factors computed by known-good nodes (i.e. compare the node's scores for ...


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You code and the fact that you are using twisted are irrelevant here. You have to set up the NAT in your router to forward port 9001 to the ip of your local machine. The way to make the configuration is router dependend. Search for "NAT port forwarding + routername". I think that is a good startingpoint. It may in rare cases be a firewall issue, but it is ...


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If you want to write a peer-to-peer application using Twisted, Vertex provides an implementation of some NAT-traversal logic for establishing stream-based connections over UDP. Unfortunately its documentation is pretty thin, and writing up exactly how to use it would be pretty long-winded for an SO answer, but if you try to use it and start filing bugs you ...



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