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WebRTC is not a browser technology (though it is well designed for browsers), but a complex of technologies for video/audio/files/messages P2P delivery: codecs, APIs, routers etc. You can use WebRTC to even transmitting video/audio/messages/files between two servers (still peer to peer, isn't it). Practically, you can use any device with access to local ...


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You do not need a browser to use WebRTC. Google has sample applications for Android and iOS. These are built using native code, which means there is no HTML; you use Java or Objective-C to handle the same API.


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Judging from the variable naming from the answer to the question you linked: Method m = wpm.getClass().getMethod( "setDeviceName", new Class[] { WifiP2pManager.Channel.class, String.class, WifiP2pManager.ActionListener.class }); you should probably call this method (getClass().getMethod(...)) on a WifiP2pManager ...


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WebRTC supports 2 audio codecs: OPUS (max bitrate 510kbit/s) and G711. You stick with OPUS, it is modern and more promising, introduced in 2012. Main files in webrtc-mp3-stream are outdated by 2 years (Jul 18, 2013). I couldn't find OPUS preference in the code, so possibly demo runs via G711. The webrtc-mp3-stream demo does the encoding job (MP3 as a ...


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Someone helped me find the solution, it appears that it emits 2 arguments when sending messages. //node::eventName, function handles senderID and data node.on("node::test", function (sentFrom, message) { console.log("New message:",message); } Also, to send a message, you must use: // userID, eventName, data (in this case, a string) ...


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It appears from a brief look at the code that you should be doing this: node.send("test", "message") Also there's not much there...you may be better off just rewriting what you need instead of trying to make sense of an undocumented small lib. Just my 2 cents.


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You are currently looking at security implementations. If you don't understand the security model & cryptography behind these libraries, your solution will - to a high certainty - not be secure. Artjom is correct in indicating that for peer to peer encryption you most likely need authentication of both parties. That is not provided by normal SSL/TLS, ...


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I didn't know the terms full cone, address restricted and port restricted. So I learn too. Nice explenation What happens is this: The routers starts with a blanc sheet of scrap paper (read-port-translation memory). It is just like a table in memory. When a connection is initiated from the local lan to the public IP space, a record is created in this ...


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Check this link for a start. i found it very useful. http://www.appcoda.com/intro-multipeer-connectivity-framework-ios-programming/ There is also Part 2 for this sample in the link. If u find this link useful,Please accept the answer


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In 4), you say you know about NAT and firewall's. Then you should also be aware of the IPv4 shortage. So, on your provider, mobile node's get a private IP address (from the DHCP server of the G3 provider, and the public address is just an address the provides has aquired from it's internet provider. The whole point of NAT is that several devices share the ...


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@Override public void onPeersAvailable(WifiP2pDeviceList peers) { // DO WHATEVER YOU WANT HERE for ( WifiP2pDevice peer : peers.getDeviceList()) { WifiP2pDevice device=peer; //here get the device info ...



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