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6

I haven't tested this, but it should give you an idea of what's needed: # Not sure if this is correct, I got it by: # 512 - COMMAND_LEN - PAYLOAD_LEN = 512 - 1 - 509 = 2 CIRCID_LEN = 2 # default to v1 PAYLOAD_LEN = 509 circ_id, command = ssl_sock.recv(CIRCID_LEN), ssl_sock.recv(1) # according to spec, command is 7 if not using v1 # -> if not v1 if ...


5

Go passes all arguments, including receivers, by value. Try using pointer receivers: (p *Packet). bytes.Buffer contains state information which is being discarded. package bytes // Simple byte buffer for marshaling data. // A Buffer is a variable-sized buffer of bytes with Read and Write methods. // The zero value for Buffer is an empty buffer ready ...


4

There's no such thing as a "message", except what you delimit yourself. REPEAT: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A MESSAGE. TCP does not send messages, it sends an octet stream. You need to send in a loop, in case there is a backlog of unacknowledged data and send does not use the whole buffer you passed in. You need to recv in a loop, in case the sending stack ...


3

You probably tried to bind an event to button1 from your forms-designer. Try to remove this in the properties window of the button or in auto generated designer code... Or it's a naming / casing issue. Certainly it has nothing to do with your UDP Socket


3

However, I seem to be running into a wall with either my understanding of how a packet sniffer works Yes. A packet sniffer does not use regular sockets; it uses whatever mechanisms are available to passively watch packets received by or sent on a network interface. If you just want to watch HTTP traffic on port 80, without responding to that traffic ...


3

The short answer is: No. The long answer is: The HTTPListener-class is used to create a very basic webserver on which you can implement your own methods and services. You might be able to use it to write a proxy and route your http requests through it though but I'm pretty sure that wasn't the main intention of it.


3

Assuming that you want to capture raw data just as Wireshark does. socket(7) clearly states that SO_BINDTODEVICE is not applicable to packet sockets. You should bind your socket to sockaddr_ll type address with sll_ifindex field set to the interface number (see packet(7) for details). Interface number can be obtained from its name (like "eth0") using ...


3

If you look for packet sniffer instead of proxy it'll give you more relevant links: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/17031/A-Network-Sniffer-in-C Any good .net packet sniffers around? http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/fyratkocak/PacketSniffer12032005034955AM/PacketSniffer.aspx [EDIT - something else to check is whether promiscuous mode is ...


3

You want what is called Raw Socket access (and use a hub or a switch that can send all the packets to your network adapter). You also want your network card in what is called "promiscuous mode", where it takes in all packets without filtering on MAC-address. When you both get the traffic on the wire and your network adapter takes them in unfiltered, your ...


3

WebSocket is a message-based protocol, so if you send a chunk of data as the payload of a WebSocket message, the peer will receive one separate WebSocket message with exactly that chunk of data as payload.


3

netstat doesn't report the packets size. You can use kstat to retrieve both the number of packets and bytes sent and received in deduce the average packet size.


3

async_read_until does exactly what it says it does: retrieves the data until the condition is true, in your case, until 0x78 is retrieved. If you want to get more data, execute another async_read_until. If you're using UDP (so "packets" actually exist), then use something that works with packets, like async_receive_from EDIT: looking at the code (which ...


2

Assuming you're in an ethernet switched network rather than something funky like a token ring: Even the great Wireshark is limited in what it is able to see because it runs in the same confines as what you're trying to build - its host PC. Unfortunately, your PC can only see the packets that hit its network interface. This means that in a layer 3 routed ...


2

If the receiver gets a timeout it needs to tell the sender, or else not tell the sender. In other words you have to implement either a NACK-based protocol or an ACK-based protocol.


2

Normally, the usual way to handle FLAGS is with a bitmap and bitwise operators. If your Packet class doesn't have specific method to test for flags, the best thing you can do IMHO is to: FIN = 0x01 SYN = 0x02 RST = 0x04 PSH = 0x08 ACK = 0x10 URG = 0x20 ECE = 0x40 CWR = 0x80 And test them like this: F = p['TCP'].flags # this should give you an integer ...


2

If Global.c_iRxArraySize is of fixed size you could try to reuse buffer and converted, also you could try to reuse SimpleDateFormat, no need to create and destroy this for every call and the DataListReceived could be reused and cleaned in the end of this process. Declare all this variables outside this scope and reuse then, I think that is the first step at ...


2

From the man page for recv: "These calls return the number of bytes received, or -1 if an error occurred. For TCP sockets, the return value 0 means the peer has closed its half side of the connection." As such recv is always allowed return all of the bytes sent, fewer than the bytes sent, or none of the bytes sent. You cannot assume anything simply ...


2

Theoretically the WebSocket protocol presents a message based protocol. However, bear in mind that... WebSocket messages consist of one or more frames. A frame can be either a complete frame or a fragmented frame. Messages themselves do not have any length indication built into the protocol, only frames do. Frames can have a payload length of up to ...


2

The question says: how many bytes ... are delivered to the IP layer The link layer header is stripped off before deliverying the frame to the IP layer, so you don't need to count it. Furthermore, the question didn't say what link layer is being used, so how could you possibly know how big its header is?


2

please find the code to get latency.and mark it as solution if it solve your problem ,so that it helps the other to find the answer. public String getLatency() { String latency =""; String ip = "ip address of the server"; String pingCmd = "ping -c 25 " + ip; try { ...


2

You can use the Packet.sprintf() method: >>> p = IP()/TCP(flags=18) >>> p.sprintf('%TCP.flags%') 'SA' If you want the "long" names, use a dict instead of a long if...elif... expression: >>> flags = { 'F': 'FIN', 'S': 'SYN', 'R': 'RST', 'P': 'PSH', 'A': 'ACK', 'U': 'URG', 'E': 'ECE', 'C': 'CWR', ...


2

If you are using pylibpcap, then you can grab the RSSI this way. This is crude and makes assumptions about the flags in the 802.11 frame (ie the flags must be 0x0000482F), but it worked for me. This is a python hack and I didn't want to go down the route of installing extra modules (dpkt and scapy have features to do this, but not well documented) when the ...


2

It looks like you are trying to make network calls on the UI thread, which is a big no no. Take a look at how to implement network operations using background threads, specifically ASyncTask There are literaly 1000's of questions and examples about this. here is a tutorial to get you started Also add the necessary permission to your manifest ...


2

The ICMP checksum is an RFC 1071 checksum: (1) Adjacent octets to be checksummed are paired to form 16-bit integers, and the 1's complement sum of these 16-bit integers is formed. (2) To generate a checksum, the checksum field itself is cleared, the 16-bit 1's complement sum is computed over the octets ...


2

It's fine to send the length of the encrypted data in the packet. Take a look at the SSL packet structure for an example: If you didn't send the length in the packet, and relied on your recipient to get the length after reading the entire stream, "Eve" could do the exact same thing to determine encrypted data length. There is no security loss in ...


2

I found this as part of an .htaccess file: order allow,deny # # Block from PALAU (PW) # deny from 103.30.248.0/22 deny from 103.251.132.0/23 deny from 202.124.224.0/20 allow from all Apparently these are Palau's assigned IPv4 blocks.


2

As per http://pcapdotnet.codeplex.com/discussions/349978 try this: //IP IpV4Layer ipLayer = (IpV4Layer)packet.Ethernet.IpV4.ExtractLayer(); ipLayer.HeaderChecksum = null; //TCP TransportLayer transportLayer = (TransportLayer)packet.Ethernet.IpV4.Transport.ExtractLayer(); transportLayer.Checksum = null; //UDP UdpLayer ...


2

Compare the values of the source and dest IPs as 64-bit numbers. Use the lower one as the hash key, and put the higher one, the protocol and the direction as the values. Do lookups the same way, use the lower value as the key.


2

If you consider that a single client can have more than one connection to a service, you'll see that you actually need four values to uniquely identify a flow: the source and destination IP addresses and the source and destination ports. For example, imagine two developers in the same office are searching StackOverflow at the same time. They'll both connect ...


2

That's an incomplete call of proc with a very strange formal parameter name (it's legal to have $ in the name of a variable, but loopy). It looks like it was half-converted from another language, and it definitely won't work like that (no procedure body!) or be anythin like idiomatic. I'd expect it really to be written like: proc two_ack_app {source ...



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