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52

Class and struct members are required by the standard to be stored in memory in the same order in which they are declared. So in your example, it wouldn't be possible for d to appear before b. Also, most architectures prefer that multi-byte types are aligned on 4- or 8-byte boundaries. So all the compiler can do is leave empty padding bytes between the ...


26

The quick and dirty first pass solution is always a great one to start with, as a comparison if nothing else. Greedy placement from large to small. Put the largest rectangle remaining into your packed area. If it can't fit anywhere, place it in a place that extends the pack region as little as possible. Repeat until you finish with the smallest rectangle. ...


25

As the comment says, we're going to pack the age, gender and height into 15 bits, of the format: AAAAAAAGHHHHHHH Let's start with this part: (age << 8) To start with, age has this format: age = 00000000AAAAAAA where each A can be 0 or 1. << 8 moves the bits 8 places to the left, and fills in the gaps with zeroes. So you get: ...


25

What you appear to be after is inheritance, being able to "store" a derived class instance in a variable of the base type like so: Stream s = new FileStream(); The fact that it is a FileStream under the hood is not lost just because you are pointing to it with the Stream goggles on. DateTime is a struct, and struct inheritance is not supported - so this ...


18

It would definitely be safer to do: sizeof(foo) * SOME_NUM


16

Have a look at packing problems. I think yours falls under '2D bin packing.' You should be able to learn a lot from solutions to that and other packing problems. Also see: Packing rectangular image data into a square texture.


15

An array of objects is required to be contiguous, so there's never padding between the objects, though padding can be added to the end of an object (producing nearly the same effect). Given that you're working with char's, the assumptions are probably right more often than not, but the C++ standard certainly doesn't guarantee it. A different compiler, or ...


15

From the MSDN documentation for #pragma pack (where n is the value you set): The alignment of a member will be on a boundary that is either a multiple of n or a multiple of the size of the member, whichever is smaller. sizeof(short) is two bytes, which is smaller than the packing value of four bytes that you set, so the short member is aligned to a ...


14

See this page on the ARC project for a survey of solutions, there is a trade-off between implementation complexity/time and optimality, but there is a wide range of algorithms to choose from. Here's an extract of the algorithms: First-Fit Decreasing Height (FFDH) algorithm FFDH packs the next item R (in non-increasing height) on the first level where R ...


12

Box packing is really simple, so perhaps your failure to understand it is because you imagine it is more complicated than it is. Layout is either Vertical (like a pile of bricks) or horizontal (like a queue of people). Each element in that layout can expand or it can not expand. Horizontal (HBox) [widget][widget][widget][widget] Vertical (VBox) ...


12

There is extensive literature on this problem. A good greedy heuristic is to place rectangles from largest area to smallest in the first available position towards the bottom and left of the container. Think of gravity pulling all of the items down to the lower left corner. For a description of this google "Chazelle bottom left packing". For optimal ...


10

This is the shortest superstring problem: find the shortest string that contains a set of given strings as substrings. According to this IEEE paper (which you may not have access to unfortunately), solving this problem exactly is NP-complete. However, heuristic solutions are available. As a first step, you should find all strings that are substrings of ...


10

How many images? If you limit the maximum page size, and have a value for the minimum picture height, you can calculate the maximum number of images per page. You would need this when evaluating any solution. I think there were 27 pictures on the link you gave. The following uses the first_fit algorithm mentioned by Robin Green earlier but then improves ...


9

This is the circles in square packing problem. It is discussed as problem D1 in Unsolved problems in geometry, by Hallard T. Croft, Kenneth J. Falconer, and Richard K. Guy, page 108. Pages 109 and 110 contain a list of references.


9

You actually violate the strict aliasing rules (section 3.10 of the C++ standard) with these reinterpret casts. This will probably blow up in your face when you turn on the compiler optimizations. C++ standard, section 3.10 paragraph 15 says: If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through an lvalue of other than one of the ...


9

You could use class MyDateTime { public static explicit operator DateTime(MyDateTime dt) { return new DateTime(); // Convert dt here } }


8

Blindly dropping the 2 LSBs of the float may fail for small number of unusual NaN encodings. A NaN is encoded as exponent=255, mantissa!=0, but IEEE-754 doesn't say anything about which mantiassa values should be used. If the mantissa value is <= 3, you could turn a NaN into an infinity!


8

This could be a rather long lesson in bit manipulation but first let me point you too the bit masking article on Wikipedia. packed_info = (age << 8) | (gender << 7) | height; Take age and move it's value over 8 bits then take gender and move it over 7 bits and height will occupy the last bits. age = 0b101 gender = 0b1 height = 0b1100 ...


8

For #1, the reason it's not done is that both the C and C++ standards prohibit structure member reordering. Yes, struct packing will generally reduce performance. And, as mentioned in a comment, in some cases on non-x86 architectures you can get a SIGBUS if you try to operate on a member. For #2, yes a perl script might be able to do it. Instead of parsing ...


8

A totally different route would be to define static table of all possible combinations and perform a lookup instead of calculating results each time. I think thats how they do it in cryptography. array[i] x 3 should be much faster than numBits bitwise operations. It will occupy some heap though.


7

Your struct has only 31 bits


7

You have to be very careful with any widening conversion and numeric promotion, but the code below converts 4 byte into int: byte b1 = -1; byte b2 = -2; byte b3 = -3; byte b4 = -4; int i = ((0xFF & b1) << 24) | ((0xFF & b2) << 16) | ((0xFF & b3) << 8) | (0xFF & b4); ...


7

Not a complete answer, and I don't know how useful it will be to you. But here goes: The hamming distance strikes me as a red herring. Your problem statement says it must be at least 1 but it could be 1000. It suffices to say the bit encoding for each node's set memberships is unique. Your problem statement doesn't spell it out, but your solution above ...


7

A completely different approach... As I mentioned in a comment, a d3 cluster-force layout could be adapted into a heuristic method for fitting the circles into the box, by progressively changing the scale until you have a tight fit. Results so far are not perfect, so I present a few versions: Option 1, squeezes in the box to the space occupied by the ...


6

AFAIK, the order in which the bits in the struct are stored is undefined by the C99 standard (and the C89 standard too). Most likely, the bits are in the reverse order from what you expected. You should have shown the result you got as well as the result you expected - it would help us with the diagnosis. The compiler you use and the platform you run on ...


6

Because the compiler is packing your bitfield into a 32-bit int, not a 16-bit entity. In general you should avoid bitfields and use other manifest constants (enums or whatever) with explicit bit masking and shifting to access the 'sub-fields' in a field. Here's one reason why bitfields should be avoided - they aren't very portable between compilers even ...


6

char isn't guaranteed to be signed or unsigned (on PowerPC Linux, char defaults to unsigned). Spread the word! What you want is something like this macro: #include <stdint.h> /* Needed for uint32_t and uint8_t */ #define PACK(c0, c1, c2, c3) \ (((uint32_t)(uint8_t)(c0) << 24) | \ ((uint32_t)(uint8_t)(c1) << 16) | \ ...


6

I liked Joey Adam's answer except for the fact that it is written with macros (which cause a real pain in many situations) and the compiler will not give you a warning if 'char' isn't 1 byte wide. This is my solution (based off Joey's). inline uint32_t PACK(uint8_t c0, uint8_t c1, uint8_t c2, uint8_t c3) { return (c0 << 24) | (c1 << 16) | ...


6

I have an optimal solution, but you aren't going to like it :). Let's label our nodes x0, x1, ..., xn. Let B = maxi,j < n(dist(xi, xj)), where dist(xi, xj) is the minimum distance between xi and xj. For each i, place node xi at position (0, i*B). Now each node is at least B away from all the others, and the convex hull has area 0. The real point here is ...



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