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31

Parsed through http://design.geckotribe.com/colorwheel/ // complement temprgb=thisrgb; temphsv=RGB2HSV(temprgb); temphsv.hue=HueShift(temphsv.hue,180.0); temprgb=HSV2RGB(temphsv); function RGB2HSV(rgb) { hsv = new Object(); max=max3(rgb.r,rgb.g,rgb.b); dif=max-min3(rgb.r,rgb.g,rgb.b); hsv.saturation=(max==0.0)?0:(100*dif/max); if ...


19

This had me confused too. It seems bitmap.Palette returns a clone of the bitmap's palette. Once you've modified your copy, you need to reset the bitmap's pallete by using bitmap.Palette = palette, e.g. ColorPalette palette = bitmap.Palette; Color entries = palette.Entries; .... entries[i] = new Color(...); .... bitmap.Palette = palette; // The crucial ...


13

That's easy, just use the undocumented colors argument: result = image.convert('P', palette=Image.ADAPTIVE, colors=5) I'm using Image.ADAPTIVE to avoid dithering


9

Try DDevExtensions 1.61, it add ability to search for components for Delphi from version 5 and above, with other many improvement for the IDE.


8

http://labs.jboss.com/tools/ there you go :)


7

With the caveat that I don't claim any expertise at all in any field of image processing: I read over the Wikipedia article you linked, and from there found Dan Bloomberg's Leptonica. From there you can download the sources for the algorithms discussed and explained. The source code is in C, which hopefully is close enough to JavaScript (at least in the ...


7

The component palette is context sensitive, so that tabs that can't be used aren't displayed. (Visual components make no sense in a datamodule, because you can't put a visual component on a datamodule. There's no point in showing you components you can't use.) A tab that has only visual components on it will be totally hidden; if there is a mix of visual ...


6

Got the same problem, just enlarge your Graphical Layout and it works.


5

I find that taking the bitwise complement works well, and quickly. var color = 0x320ae3; var complement = 0xffffff ^ color; I'm not sure if it's a perfect complement in the sense of "mixes together to form a 70% grey", however a 70% grey is "pure white" in terms of color timing in film, and it occurred to me that xoring the rgb hex out of pure white might ...


5

Which version of Delphi? In recent versions, just click on the top of the palette and type "grid". Ctrl-Alt-P will focus the palette, and then you can just start typing. In RAD2009 and RS2010, do this and it'll find all components with "grid" anywhere in the title.


5

Check the return on imagecolorstotal, you are always getting 256 colors as the return no matter how high you set the number of colors to be dithered to. PNG-8 & GIF formats only support palettes of up to 256 colors. So even if you can use more than 256 in a palette, you'd have to save it back as true color for anyone to be able to use it, thus making the ...


5

actually i have found a way depends on this "dividing color palette" problem. i will use this color values with converting rgb values to hsv values. hue, saturation, value so i can use one integer value between 0-360 or i can use one integer between 0-100 (%) for my color palette. finally, i can easily use this values for searhing/filtering my data based ...


4

This seems to work under OS X so I can't guarantee that it will work on Linux, but to create a palette programmatically you could try the following Open the Palette you're interested in, Execute Notebooks[] Set nb to whatever the notebook is belonging to the Palette Run FrontEndTokenExecute[nb, "GenerateNotebook"] It should then open a Notebook version ...


4

From ?Startup Note that when the site and user profile files are sourced only the 'base' package is loaded, so objects in other packages need to be referred to by e.g. 'utils::dump.frames' or after explicitly loading the package concerned. So instead of palette(), call grDevices::palette(). (The call to dev.off() is needed to eliminate the ...


4

Turns out, this is possible! It requires looking up the source code, but the solution comes up pretty easily. We are interested in ggpairs function, so the first step is just ggpairs Let's see if we can find any aes mapping to fill or colour. Indeed, combo_aes <- addAndOverwriteAes(aes_string(x = xColName, y = yColName, ...), ...


3

try the Design/Text tabs in the lower left of the layout window


3

For future reference, here's the mapping table. Taken from MicahElliott/colortrans.py # Primary 3-bit # Equivalent "bright" versions 00 = 000000 08 = 808080 01 = 800000 09 = ff0000 02 = 008000 10 = 00ff00 03 = 808000 11 = ffff00 04 = 000080 12 = 0000ff 05 = 800080 ...


3

Use negative numbers to invert the palette: set pm3d map set palette rgb 21,22,23 splot x gives you whereas set pm3d map set palette rgb -21,-22,-23 splot x gives you


3

Miguel's answer is correct. Rather than making the individual numbers negative, the command set palette negative also does the trick: set pm3d map set palette negative rgb 21,22,23 splot x would produce what you wanted. You can split the command up too: set palette rgb 21,22,23 set palette negative is equivalent. You can use set palette positive to ...


3

Seems like the autoscaling of the color range doesn't work properly in this case with version 4.4.3 (with 4.6.5 your script works out of the box). Also using set autoscale cbfix doesn't works as it seems to use the values of the third column for the scaling. (comment out unset colorbox to see this). If you explicitely set a color range, it works fine also ...


3

You can convert an image to use a fixed number of colors, by passing in an array of QRgb values with convertToFormat: http://qt-project.org/doc/qt-5/qimage.html#convertToFormat-2 There's no dithering in that case...it just picks the nearest color to use. So it's not forcing your hand about the palette, but you have to decide what colors to use. There are ...


3

Basically there are several ways to achieve what you want. First I show three possibilities to process the static data into an animated gif: Use an external tool (here awk) to process the data file once. (Variant of 1: Use an external tool like awk to process the data on the fly) Use gnuplot only Variant 1: preprocessing the data I think an appropriate ...


3

TGifImage has such an array built in, so just make use of it: var Gif:TGifImage; PaletteIndex : byte; begin Gif := TGifImage.Create; // ... load your stuff here ... // TGifImage has an Images property, which is probably only interesting if you're dealing with animations, so just take the first image. PaletteIndex := Gif.Images[0].Pixels[0,0]; ...


3

That's not possible with ggplot2. I think it against the philosophy of ggplot2 because it complicates the interpreatation of the plot. Another option is to use different shapes to separate the points. testdf <- data.frame( x = rnorm(100), y1 = rnorm(100, mean = 0, sd = 1), y2 = rnorm(100, mean = 10, sd = 1), ...


3

If you translate the "blues" and "reds" to varying transparency, then it is not against ggplot's philosophy. So, using Thierry's Moltenversion of the data set: ggplot(Molten, aes(x, value, alphy = yc, colour = variable)) + geom_point() Should do the trick.


3

You can create a custom BitmapPalette and apply it to a new WriteableBitmap: var myPalette = new BitmapPalette(new List<Color> { Colors.Red, Colors.Blue, Colors.Green, // ... }); var writeableBitmap = new WriteableBitmap( width, height, 96, 96, PixelFormats.Indexed8, // Paletted bitmap with 256 colours ...


3

Create a D3DFMT_L8 texture containing the paletted image, and an 256x1 D3DFMT_X8R8G8B8 image containing the palette. HLSL shader code: uniform sampler2D image; uniform sampler1D palette; float4 main(in float2 coord:TEXCOORD) : COLOR { return tex1D(palette, tex2D(image, coord).r * (255./256) + (0.5/256)); } Note that the luminance (palette index) is ...


3

try this: main(); function main(){ var progress_win = new Window ("palette"); var progress = progress_bar(progress_win, 2, 'Doing Something. Please be patient'); delay(1); progress.value = progress.value+1; delay(1); progress.parent.close(); } // delay function found here //found here ...


3

Your answer provided me with an idea for my script: instead of just having a pop-up that says "I'm done!", show a progress bar! So, using the ScriptUI for dummies document, I was able to come up with the following code for the beginning of the script: // Creating a progress bar window. var w = new Window("palette"); var progress = progress_bar(w, 27); var ...


3

The tool: http://colorschemedesigner.com/ The code: http://colorschemedesigner.com/js/color.js The code itself is pretty beastly, so good luck parsing.



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