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22

Parsed through http://design.geckotribe.com/colorwheel/ // complement temprgb=thisrgb; temphsv=RGB2HSV(temprgb); temphsv.hue=HueShift(temphsv.hue,180.0); temprgb=HSV2RGB(temphsv); function RGB2HSV(rgb) { hsv = new Object(); max=max3(rgb.r,rgb.g,rgb.b); dif=max-min3(rgb.r,rgb.g,rgb.b); hsv.saturation=(max==0.0)?0:(100*dif/max); if ...


16

This had me confused too. It seems bitmap.Palette returns a clone of the bitmap's palette. Once you've modified your copy, you need to reset the bitmap's pallete by using bitmap.Palette = palette, e.g. ColorPalette palette = bitmap.Palette; Color entries = palette.Entries; .... entries[i] = new Color(...); .... bitmap.Palette = palette; // The crucial ...


7

The component palette is context sensitive, so that tabs that can't be used aren't displayed. (Visual components make no sense in a datamodule, because you can't put a visual component on a datamodule. There's no point in showing you components you can't use.) A tab that has only visual components on it will be totally hidden; if there is a mix of visual ...


6

With the caveat that I don't claim any expertise at all in any field of image processing: I read over the Wikipedia article you linked, and from there found Dan Bloomberg's Leptonica. From there you can download the sources for the algorithms discussed and explained. The source code is in C, which hopefully is close enough to JavaScript (at least in the ...


5

Check the return on imagecolorstotal, you are always getting 256 colors as the return no matter how high you set the number of colors to be dithered to. PNG-8 & GIF formats only support palettes of up to 256 colors. So even if you can use more than 256 in a palette, you'd have to save it back as true color for anyone to be able to use it, thus making the ...


5

actually i have found a way depends on this "dividing color palette" problem. i will use this color values with converting rgb values to hsv values. hue, saturation, value so i can use one integer value between 0-360 or i can use one integer between 0-100 (%) for my color palette. finally, i can easily use this values for searhing/filtering my data based ...


4

This seems to work under OS X so I can't guarantee that it will work on Linux, but to create a palette programmatically you could try the following Open the Palette you're interested in, Execute Notebooks[] Set nb to whatever the notebook is belonging to the Palette Run FrontEndTokenExecute[nb, "GenerateNotebook"] It should then open a Notebook version ...


4

Turns out, this is possible! It requires looking up the source code, but the solution comes up pretty easily. We are interested in ggpairs function, so the first step is just ggpairs Let's see if we can find any aes mapping to fill or colour. Indeed, combo_aes <- addAndOverwriteAes(aes_string(x = xColName, y = yColName, ...), ...


4

From ?Startup Note that when the site and user profile files are sourced only the 'base' package is loaded, so objects in other packages need to be referred to by e.g. 'utils::dump.frames' or after explicitly loading the package concerned. So instead of palette(), call grDevices::palette(). (The call to dev.off() is needed to eliminate the ...


3

Use negative numbers to invert the palette: set pm3d map set palette rgb 21,22,23 splot x gives you whereas set pm3d map set palette rgb -21,-22,-23 splot x gives you


3

Miguel's answer is correct. Rather than making the individual numbers negative, the command set palette negative also does the trick: set pm3d map set palette negative rgb 21,22,23 splot x would produce what you wanted. You can split the command up too: set palette rgb 21,22,23 set palette negative is equivalent. You can use set palette positive to ...


3

Basically there are several ways to achieve what you want. First I show three possibilities to process the static data into an animated gif: Use an external tool (here awk) to process the data file once. (Variant of 1: Use an external tool like awk to process the data on the fly) Use gnuplot only Variant 1: preprocessing the data I think an appropriate ...


3

You can approach this as a purely mathematical equipartition problem, but then it isn't really about color. If you are trying to equipartition a color palette in a way that is meaningful to human perception, there are a large number of non-linearities that need to be taken into account which this article only mentions. For example, the colors #fffffe, ...


3

To get an icon, you need to provide a BeanInfo for you class. The easiest way to do this is right click on the class in the Project window and select BeanInfo editor.... You'll want to switch to the designer view to configure which properties are expert/hidden/preferred. Preferred properties appear in the top most fold (Properties) of the Property ...


3

An easy way is using the threshold method. It's a bit cumbersome at first, but it's pretty fast (as fast as you'll get, I think) This will change every red pixel (considering red only a pixel whose value is exactly 0xffff0000) to blue (0xff0000ff). var colorToReplace:uint = 0xffff0000; var newColor:uint = 0xff0000ff; var maskToUse:uint = 0xffffffff; var ...


3

TGifImage has such an array built in, so just make use of it: var Gif:TGifImage; PaletteIndex : byte; begin Gif := TGifImage.Create; // ... load your stuff here ... // TGifImage has an Images property, which is probably only interesting if you're dealing with animations, so just take the first image. PaletteIndex := Gif.Images[0].Pixels[0,0]; ...


3

For future reference, here's the mapping table. Taken from MicahElliott/colortrans.py # Primary 3-bit # Equivalent "bright" versions 00 = 000000 08 = 808080 01 = 800000 09 = ff0000 02 = 008000 10 = 00ff00 03 = 808000 11 = ffff00 04 = 000080 12 = 0000ff 05 = 800080 ...


3

That's not possible with ggplot2. I think it against the philosophy of ggplot2 because it complicates the interpreatation of the plot. Another option is to use different shapes to separate the points. testdf <- data.frame( x = rnorm(100), y1 = rnorm(100, mean = 0, sd = 1), y2 = rnorm(100, mean = 10, sd = 1), ...


3

If you translate the "blues" and "reds" to varying transparency, then it is not against ggplot's philosophy. So, using Thierry's Moltenversion of the data set: ggplot(Molten, aes(x, value, alphy = yc, colour = variable)) + geom_point() Should do the trick.


3

You can create a custom BitmapPalette and apply it to a new WriteableBitmap: var myPalette = new BitmapPalette(new List<Color> { Colors.Red, Colors.Blue, Colors.Green, // ... }); var writeableBitmap = new WriteableBitmap( width, height, 96, 96, PixelFormats.Indexed8, // Paletted bitmap with 256 colours ...


2

Create a D3DFMT_L8 texture containing the paletted image, and an 256x1 D3DFMT_X8R8G8B8 image containing the palette. HLSL shader code: uniform sampler2D image; uniform sampler1D palette; float4 main(in float2 coord:TEXCOORD) : COLOR { return tex1D(palette, tex2D(image, coord).r * (255./256) + (0.5/256)); } Note that the luminance (palette index) is ...


2

You'll have to add to every palette element this startFunction: //DragFunctions is the object that has all the 3 d&d methods, clearer in the complete file paletteStart: function () { // keep the relative coords at the start of the drag this.ox = 0; this.oy = 0; // as we are dragging the palette element, we clone it to leave one in his ...


2

My Problem has been solved: All we need to do to enable nebula widgets in our Eciplse Indigo Design-View's(window-Builder) palette is: putting the respective nebula widget's jar file into our project's class-path from previous Eclipse-helios IDE's plugin folder; and switching into design-view; then nebula widgets are available there under group 'nebula' as ...


2

There certainly is a way to iterate through the color spectrum, but whether you go this approach is your own choice :). You can make use of the HSL color space (Hue, saturation, and lightness) instead of RGB (red, green, blue). The hue represents which color (ranging from 0 to 360), the saturation is how much of that color your want (0 to 100), and the ...


2

You just need to add custom attribute(title) to select model options. To do this you need to add your own OptionModel implementation: public class CustomOptionModel implements OptionModel { private final String label; private final Object value; private final Map<String, String> attributes; public CustomOptionModel(final String label, ...


2

import numpy as np import Image def palette(img): """ Return palette in descending order of frequency """ arr = np.asarray(img) palette, index = np.unique(asvoid(arr).ravel(), return_inverse=True) palette = palette.view(arr.dtype).reshape(-1, arr.shape[-1]) count = np.bincount(index) order = np.argsort(count) return ...


2

Implement SelectModel and pass it to the model parameter. As the documentation for the parameter says Model used to define the values and labels used when rendering.


2

An 8 bit per pixel bitmap needs an associated palette to specify the colors, which is separate - you get it from the clipboard using CF_PALETTE. Once you have it you use SelectPalette and RealizePalette on the DC that the bitmap is selected into.


2

What you want to do is going to require a lot of pixel level work, so I recommend that you use a pygame.PixelArray object for direct pixel access of the surface(s). For what you specifically want to do, it sounds like you could use the pygame.PixelArray.replace() method.


2

try this: main(); function main(){ var progress_win = new Window ("palette"); var progress = progress_bar(progress_win, 2, 'Doing Something. Please be patient'); delay(1); progress.value = progress.value+1; delay(1); progress.parent.close(); } // delay function found here //found here ...



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