Hot answers tagged

82

First, a recap: loc works on labels in the index. iloc works on the positions in the index (so it only takes integers). ix usually tries to behave like loc but falls back to behaving like iloc if the label is not in the index. It's important to note some subtleties that can make ix slightly tricky to use: if the index is of integer type, ix will only ...


67

You can also use the option_context, with one or more options: with pd.option_context('display.max_rows', 999, 'display.max_columns', 3): print df This will automatically return the options to their previous values.


36

As documented in http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/text.html: df.columns = df.columns.str.replace('$','')


31

tl;dr If you just want to count the number of rows per group, do: df.groupby(key_columns).size() where key_columns is the list of columns you are grouping by, for example key_columns = ['col1','col2'] In what follows I will elaborate some more. Setup some test data In[1]: import numpy as np import pandas as pd keys = np.array([ ['A', ...


23

Assumed imports: import pandas as pd John Gait's answer is basically a reduce operation. If I have more than a handful of dataframes, I'd put them in a list like this (generated via list comprehensions or loops or whatnot): dfs = [df0, df1, df2, dfN] Assuming they have some common column, like name in your example, I'd do the following: df_final = ...


23

This relates to column oriented databases versus row oriented. Your first example is a row oriented data structure, and the second is column oriented. In the particular case of Python, the first could be made notably more efficient using slots, such that the dictionary of columns doesn't need to be duplicated for every row. Which form works better depends ...


21

With pandas version 0.16.x, there is now a DataFrame.sample method built-in: import pandas df = pandas.DataFrame(data) # Randomly sample 70% of your dataframe df_0.7 = df.sample(frac=0.7) # Randomly sample 7 elements from your dataframe df_7 = df.sample(n=7) For either approach above, you can get the rest of the rows by doing: df_rest = ...


19

mycolumns = ['A', 'B'] df = pd.DataFrame(columns=mycolumns) rows = [[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]] for row in rows: df.loc[len(df)] = row


16

List comprehension is another way to create another column conditionally. If your working with object dtypes in columns, like in your example, list comps typically out perform most other methods. Example list comp: df['color'] = ['red' if x == 'Z' else 'green' for x in df['Set']] %timeit tests: import pandas as pd import numpy as np df = ...


16

For me @Charles Duffy comment solved it. Use LC_ALL=C


15

I have the same error and have decided that it is a bug. It seems to be caused by the presence of NaN values in a DataFrame in Spyder. I have uninstalled and reinstalled all packages and nothing has effected it. NaN values are supported and are completely valid in DataFrames especially if they have a DateTime index. In the end I have settled for ...


15

iloc works based on integer positioning. So no matter what your row labels are, you can always, e.g., get the first row by doing df.iloc[0] or the last five rows by doing df.iloc[-5:] You can also use it on the columns. This retrieves the 3rd column: df.iloc[:, 2] # the : in the first position indicates all rows You can combine them to get ...


15

for column in df: print(df[column])


14

map_partitions You can apply your function to all of the partitions of your dataframe with the map_partitions function. df.map_partitions(func, columns=...) Note that func will be given only part of the dataset at a time, not the entire dataset like with pandas apply (which presumably you wouldn't want if you want to do parallelism.) map / apply You ...


14

tl;dr The pandas equivalent to select * from table where column_name = some_value is table[table.column_name == some_value] Code example: import pandas as pd # Create data set d = {'foo':[100, 111, 222], 'bar':[333, 444, 555]} df = pd.DataFrame(d) # Full dataframe: df # Shows: # bar foo # 0 333 100 # 1 444 111 # 2 555 222 # ...


14

Drop by index delete first, second and fourth columns: df.drop(df.columns[[0,1,3]], axis=1, inplace=True) delete first column: df.drop(df.columns[[0]], axis=1, inplace=True) There is an optional parameter inplace so that the original data can be modified without creating a copy. Popped Column selection, addition, deletion delete column column-name: ...


14

Like what has been mentioned before, pandas object is most efficient when process the whole array at once. However for those who really need to loop through a pandas DataFrame to perform something, like me, I found at least three ways to do it. I have done a short test to see which one of the three is the least time consuming. t = pd.DataFrame({'a': ...


14

Remove the get_figure and just use sns_plot.savefig('output.png') df = sns.load_dataset('iris') sns_plot = sns.pairplot(df, hue='species', size=2.5) sns_plot.savefig("output.png")


13

Since 0.14.1, you can now do nlargest and nsmallest on a groupby object: In [23]: df.groupby('id')['value'].nlargest(2) Out[23]: id 1 2 3 1 2 2 6 4 5 3 3 7 1 4 8 1 dtype: int64 There's a slight weirdness that you get the original index in there as well, but this might be really useful depending on what your original ...


13

I would suggest using the duplicated method on the Pandas Index itself: df3 = df3[~df3.index.duplicated(keep='first')] While all the methods suggested above work, the currently accepted answer is by far the least performant for the provided example. Furthermore, while the groupby method is only slightly less performant in this case I personally find the ...


13

df = pd.DataFrame({'A':['a', 'b', 'c'], 'B':[54, 67, 89]}, index=[100, 200, 300]) df A B 100 a 54 200 b 67 300 c 89 In [19]: df.loc[100] Out[19]: A a B 54 Name: 100, dtype: object In [20]: df.iloc[0] Out[20]: A a B 54 Name: 100, dtype: ...


12

Try this function, which also displays variable names for the correlation matrix: def plot_corr(df,size=10): '''Function plots a graphical correlation matrix for each pair of columns in the dataframe. Input: df: pandas DataFrame size: vertical and horizontal size of the plot''' corr = df.corr() fig, ax = ...


12

df2.combine_first(df1) (documentation) seems to serve your requirement; PFB code snippet & output import pandas as pd print 'pandas-version: ', pd.__version__ df1 = pd.DataFrame.from_records([('2015-07-09 12:00:00',1,1,1), ('2015-07-09 13:00:00',1,1,1), ('2015-07-09 14:00:00',1,1,1), ...


12

For MultiIndex you can extract its subindex using df['si_name'] = R.index.get_level_values('si_name') where si_name is the name of the subindex.


12

A faster way is to implement a vectorized version of the function, which operates on a two dimensional ndarray directly. This is very doable since many functions in numpy can operate on two dimensional ndarray, controlled using the axis parameter. A possible implementation: def sparseness2(xs): nr = np.sqrt(xs.shape[1]) a = np.sum(np.abs(xs), ...


11

Pass param rot=0 to rotate the xticks: import matplotlib matplotlib.style.use('ggplot') import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas as pd df = pd.DataFrame({ 'celltype':["foo","bar","qux","woz"], 's1':[5,9,1,7], 's2':[12,90,13,87]}) df = df[["celltype","s1","s2"]] df.set_index(["celltype"],inplace=True) df.plot(kind='bar',alpha=0.75, rot=0) ...


11

For me skyjur's answer almost worked. I had to set the engine for the writer explicitly with: writer = pd.ExcelWriter(excel_file, engine='openpyxl') otherwise it would throw AttributeError: 'Workbook' object has no attribute 'add_worksheet'


11

You can easily do this though, df.apply(LabelEncoder().fit_transform)


11

As explained on another answer using pandas.DataFrame() directly here will not act as you think. What you can do is use pandas.DataFrame.from_dictwith orient='index': In[7]: pandas.DataFrame.from_dict({u'2012-06-08': 388, u'2012-06-09': 388, u'2012-06-10': 388, u'2012-06-11': 389, u'2012-06-12': 389, u'2012-06-13': 389, u'2012-06-14': 389, ...


11

If you want to read a zipped or a tar.gz file into pandas dataframe, the read_csv methods includes this particular implementation. df = pd.read_csv(filename.tar.gz, compression='gzip', header=0, sep=',', quotechar='"') compression : {‘gzip’, ‘bz2’, ‘infer’, None}, default ‘infer’ For on-the-fly decompression of on-disk data. If ‘infer’, then use gzip ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible