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23

Perhaps you aren't aware of this, but the members in the Parallel class are simply (complicated) wrappers around Task objects. In case you're wondering, the Parallel class creates the Task objects with TaskCreationOptions.None. However, the MaxDegreeOfParallelism would affect those task objects no matter what creation options were passed to the task ...


18

First of all, your algorithm is memory bandwidth bounded. That is memory load/store would outweigh any index calculations you do. Vector operations like SSE/AVX would not help either - you are not doing any intensive calculations. Increasing work amount per iteration is also useless - both PPL and TBB are smart enough, to not create thread per iteration, ...


13

This is by design. You are seeing the threadpool manager trying to keep a limited number of threads in the executing state. Important to ensure that your program isn't running more threads than your machine has cpu cores. That's inefficient, less work gets done when Windows is forced to start swapping the cores between active threads. The threadpool ...


11

One might be tempted to think that that the answer can be found in the documentation: AStride: The Integer that represents the increment of the loop iteration. I'd read that as implying that the loop variable values are 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. However that is not the case. This program: {$APPTYPE CONSOLE} uses System.Threading; var Lock: TMonitor; ...


9

If you want to use Parallel.For, you need to some synchronization, may be using locks as well. If you really want to use Parallel.For, I would suggest you to please follow the link, it beautifully explains Parallel.For... http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163340.aspx Hope, it helps


8

Stephen Toub has a post about Implementing Parallel While with Parallel.ForEach.


7

The simple answer is that you're attempting to work with components that require Single threading, more specifically it looks like they only want to run on the UI thread. So using Parallel.For is not going to be useful to you. Even when you use the dispatcher, you're just marshaling the work over to the single UI thread which negates any benefits from ...


6

If you are using Parallel the order in which they are executed is not of relevance therefore "Parallel". You should use a sequential workflow if the order is relevant for you.


5

So you have a statement that looks something like this? (based on your comments above). Parallel.Foreach(myData, ..., (d) => { StringBuilder sb new StringBuilder sb.Append(d); // WriteLine sb? }); There are a number of issues with this approach. Neither Parallel.For or Parallel.ForEach will guarentee that your access to the contents of myData are ...


5

No, PFX doesn't do that for you. Take a look at Microsoft Accelerator to run some code on a GPU. I recommend in particular Tomas Petricek's series of articles on F# and Accelerator. Also watch the gpu branch of LinqOptimizer.


5

You can't do this within parfor, where the iterations must be independent. Instead, take a look at the spmd block, and the commands labSend, labReceive and labBroadcast.


4

parallel_for will take any functor, which can be a lambda, a functor class or a plain old function; the following should work just fine too: #include "tbb/tbb.h" using namespace tbb; ... void print( size_t n) { printf("hellow world %d\n", n); } void print_range( const blocked_range<size_t> & r ){ for( size_t i = r.begin(); i != r.end(); ...


4

Synchronization overhead I would guess that the amount of work done per iteration of the loop is too small. Had you split the image into four parts and ran the computation in parallel, you would have noticed a large gain. Try to design the loop in a way that would case less iterations and more work per iteration. The reasoning behind this is that there is ...


4

Parallelizing database query is completely wrong for the following reasons: 1-Query is issued against sql from each processor so multiple data readers will be opened -> 'error' 2-no performance gain is achieved, in fact the program becomes slower because each processor is trying to connect to the database and no parallel processing is ...


4

TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning will 'remove' the ThreadPool limitation. I don't know the easy way to specify TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning for Parallel.For. However, you can achieve the same effect using Task class: Action<int> action = i => { Console.Write("start {0} ", i); Thread.Sleep(5000); Console.Write("finish ...


4

I think you need to add the flag -fopenmp to your compiler: g++ tempomp.cpp -o tomp -lgomp -fopenmp When -fopenmp is used, the compiler will generate parallel code based on the OpenMP directives encountered. -lgomp loads libraries of the Gnu OpenMP Project. How many cores do your machine have?


4

Both options are entirely inappropriate for your scenario. TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning is certainly a better choice for tasks that are not CPU-bound, as the TPL (Parallel classes/extensions) are almost exclusively meant for maximizing the throughput of a CPU-bound operation by running it on multiple cores (not threads). However, 1000 tasks is an ...


4

No, the end variable (listed as toExclusive in the documentation) is not available within the scope of the lambda.


4

I would write MyParallel class like below public static class MyParallel { public static void While(Func<bool> condition, Action action) { Parallel.ForEach(WhileTrue(condition), _ => action()); } static IEnumerable<bool> WhileTrue(Func<bool> condition) { while (condition()) yield return true; } } ...


3

You cannot interact with the UI from background threads. Therefore, you cannot use Parallel.For to manage UI.


3

While this is not a direct comparison, I think it may help you. I do something similar to what you describe (in my case I know there is a load balanced server cluster on the other end serving REST calls). I get good results using Parrallel.ForEach to spin up an optimal number of worker threads provided that I also use the following code to tell my ...


3

Your UI thread will wait for Parallel.For to complete before it continues. That means it can't process any further UI messages until it's completed. Now when the worker threads call Invoke, they wait until the UI thread processes the delegate before they continue. So they're waiting for the UI thread to get free, basically. Hence, you have a deadlock - the ...


3

It sounds like you are deadlocking the UI thread. This makes perfect sense, as your button2_Click doesn't exit until For completes, and in particular, no message-loop events can be processed until button2_Click has completed. If you are on a different thread, Invoke uses a message-loop event, and does not return until that item is processed - so nothing will ...


3

if you don't know how many times the loop will pass Parallel.For is not an option. But you can easily use simple tasks and do it for yourself: object syncRoot = new object(); bool finished = false; private bool Finished() { // or implement any other logic to evaluate whether loop has finished // but thread safe lock (this.syncRoot) { ...


3

This will also solve the problem: Declare a combinable object: Concurrency::combinable<vector <string>> sqlStringsCombinable; And in the loop: sqlStringsCombinable.local().push_back(strSQL.str()); After the loop, combine them: sqlStringsCombinable.combine_each([&sqlStrings](const std::vector<CString>& vec) { ...


3

I updated the code slightly to show the ThreadID when writing to the Console, Console.WriteLine("start index:{0} thread id:{1} Time:{2} ", index, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId.ToString(), DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString()); Thread.Sleep(5000); ConsoleWriteLine("finish index:{0} thread id:{1} Time:{2} ", index, ...


3

Parallel frameworks such as TBB (and Cilk Plus and PPL) focus on optional concurrency, which allows them to harvest just enough to keep the machine busy but not overload it. If concurrency among producers is required then most TBB constructs are inappropriate. For example, tbb::parallel_for makes no promise that it will run anything in parallel. It just ...


3

Use a critical or atomic within the loop: #pragma omp critical { (++prog); } or better: #pragma omp atomic (++prog); and think about only letting the master thread print the progress. if(omp_get_thread_num() == 0) { cout << "Progress: " << float(prog)/totalNumber; }


3

Wow! I found the answer! "parallel_for" and "parallel_for_" (with a trailing underscore!) are totally different. You need the trailing underscore to make it work! Otherwise it will just run your loop in serial and you will have to use a BLOCKEDRANGE instead of a range! AHH! Thanks to @Daniil Osokin and especially @Vladislav Vinogradov for pointing this ...


3

From comments: No, OpenMP won't do this for you for the same reasons as in this answer given to a question about OpenMP loops with integer arithmetic; it's extremely difficult for the compiler to reason about floating point numbers - in particular, the compiler needs to know before entering the loop the loop's tripcount, and floating point arithmetic in the ...



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