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3

tic and toc do not exist in the parfor paradigm because tic and toc are timing on a single thread. Because you are running things in parallel, there will be thread / context switching and so the timing for each thread that is spawned when parfor is activated will be grossly inaccurate... which is why these commands are naturally unsupported. You can, ...


3

This answer consists of two parts: Accelerating the calculation of many independent scalar products; Solving your specific problem. PART 1 The problem of calculating a large number of independent scalar products is an embarassingly parallel problem. If you aim at accelerating only the mentioned scalar products, retaining the rest of the computation on ...


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You should use one of the Parallel.ForEach loops that has a local state. Each seperate partition of a parallelized loop has a unique local state, which means it doesn't need synchronization. As a final action you have to aggregate every local state into the final value. This step requires synchronization but is only called once for every partition instead ...


2

You cannot. Promises don't "make code parallel", they just provide a better abstraction for asynchronous code - they don't have more power than callbacks. A synchronous code will always be executed synchronously, and is - due to JavaScript's single-threaded nature - not parallelisable. Even if you give it a callback whose execution is deferred by the use of ...


2

The function spawn/3 with the module and the function name as the first and second argument requires that the function is exported. In fact, any explicit qualified call: module:function(...) or implicit qualified call: apply(module, function, ...) requires that the function be exported. Whether it's supposedly from the same module or not is irrelevant ...


2

In addition to using doMPI or doRedis, you need to write a function that returns an appropriate iterator. There are a number of examples in my vignette "Writing Custom Iterators" from the iterators package that should be helpful, but here's a quick attempt at such a function: ixts <- function(xtsnames) { it <- iter(xtsnames) nextEl <- ...


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Parallel and Concurrent Programming in Haskell has a lot of good information, and async is a good library for this stuff. At the bottom level though, you'll find forkIO to start a new lightweight thread. Of course that's concurrency, not deterministic parallelism, parallel is the library for that, and also covered in the book. Your example translates to: ...


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Since Boyd already provided an answer on concurrency and parallelism, lets focus on your PS. PS: Also, if possible, some optimisations for improving the speed of the operations. 1. Memoization Here's your version of pairs: pairs :: (Integer, Integer) -> [(Integer, Integer)] pairs (lower, upper) = [(m, n) | m <- [lower..upper], n <- ...


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This issue is being tracked at https://github.com/JuliaLang/julia/issues/7646 and I reproduce the answer by Amit Murthy: pid 1 does an addprocs(3) addprocs returns after it has established connections with all 3 new workers. However, at this time the the connections between workers may not have been setup, i.e. from pids 3 -> 2, 4 -> 2 and 4 -> 3. Now pid ...


1

here is one approach that worked for me fine ( important note: using maven as build manager ) =========================================== You will need to have Maven and Firefox installed on your machine in order to run this example. Once you have retrieved the source, you can run by navigating into the Cucumber-JVM-Parallel directory and issuing the ...


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It's normal approach. But I would recommend you to use Executor but not create Threads. Sample: public class TasksSample { public static void execute(){ ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4); executorService.submit(new Task("A")); executorService.submit(new Task("B")); ...


1

I didn't actually test that it works, but I think you can compute the distance in the map stage, return StationWithDistance or null based on the distance, and then filter out the nulls. public List<StationWithDistance> getNearbyStationsNewWay(Coordinate origin, double radius) { return allStations.stream() .parallel() .map(s -> { ...


1

multiprocessing.Process doesn't know how many other processes are open, or do anything to manage the number of running Process objects. You need to use multiprocessing.Pool to get that functionality. When you use Process directly, you launch the subprocess as soon as you call p.start(), and wait for the Process to exit when you call p.join(). So in your ...


1

To parallelize this using MIMD with OpenMP you can do this: #pragma omp parallel for for(int i = 0; i< ts.size(); i++){ for(int j = 0; j< A.size(); j++){ if(abs(scalarProduct(ts.at(i), A.at(j))) <epsilon){ score[i] +=1; } } } You could also consider using SIMD. In that case you should change your data ...


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Instead of optimising for arithmetic, you should use better algorithm first. In most practical situation ts and A are not totally random per each cycle, and you may somehow organise (sort) them spatially, and greatly reduce the need for calculating spatial metric. Now if you insist to stick with current algorithm, you may enable compiler to emit SSE code, ...


1

The function pmap does take any number of arguments each one a collection function pmap(f, lsts...; err_retry=true, err_stop=false) The function f will be sent an argument for each collection Example Multi-argument Function julia> @everywhere f(s,count)=(println("process id = $(myid()) s = $s count = $count");repeat(s,count)) pmap use 1 julia> ...


1

I do not know if this is available under either Java or Windows. In C/C++ under a UNIX-type OS, you can (with the appropriate privileges) re-prioritize your application to a negative priority level. Negative priorities are typically referred to as "real-time priorities", since the OS will not adjust them, and they will get priority over (almost) everything ...


1

This is clearly a bug in caret 6.0-30 that was introduced sometime after version 5.17-7. It's also another problem that is more likely to hit Windows users, since the doParallel "mclapply mode" works, while the "clusterApplyLB mode" fails. I've run some tests, and it appears that the problem is due to the cluster workers not being properly initialized to ...


1

First off, promises won't help you make code run in parallel. They are a tool for running other code when your task is done or coordinating this task with other tasks. But making your current code run in parallel with other code has nothing to do with promises. Second off, there's little advantage (and a lot of complication) to taking a synchronous task ...


1

EDIT: To test the running time of some execution, the standard way is to use the ScalaMeter framework for performance regression testing. val gen = Gen.range("times")(1000, 2000, 500) performance of "Futures" in { using(gen) in { time => val f: Future[Unit] = runningFor(time) // returns some future that takes time milliseconds to execute ...


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I have no ideas if this will be faster, but a little observation; what if you sort all the elements in buffer[]? It would mean that there is no crossing between different cores anymore. If the performance is applicable, you can then increase core count, it should go up linearly. Note that you really need to handle the firstRange/secondRange splitting a ...


1

I don't have any experience with Parallel, but I whipped up a test with manual threading, and it works perfectly. private class Worker { public Thread Thread; public int[] Accumulator = new int[256]; public int Start, End; public byte[] Data; public Worker( int start, int end, byte[] buf ) { this.Start = start; ...


1

For your scenario, whether you're evaluating a collection with foreach or Parallel.ForEach makes no difference. This is true of a lot of things. Parallel.ForEach doesn't magically kick enumerators into some special thread-safe mode. From the fine manual: Remarks The enumeration represents a moment-in-time snapshot of the contents of the bag. It ...


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It sounds like you want your processes to do something like this: Open up your pcap file Read some packet out of it Pass that packet onto two threads of your process, each one configured differently You could have your script read the pcap file and pass binary data on stdin to your c++ program which then processes it. Or you could use a socket, shared ...


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Since you did not provide any code I'll have to stick to a general answer. In all parallel computing there are several design considerations, the two most important are: is your code able to run in parallel, and secondly: how much communication overhead do you create. Calling workers means sending information back and forth, so there is an optimum in ...


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TBB's concurrent_vector acts much like std::vector, but allows parallel calls to push_back.


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When the computation and data that you are using have irregular behaviors that mostly translates to many message-passings between objects, or when you need low level hardware level accesses e.g. RDMA then MPI is better. In some answers that you see in here the latency of tasks or memory consistency model gets mentioned, frameworks like Spark or Actor Models ...



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