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4

You can parallelize this with Dask.dataframe. This will work almost the same except that you can't use column assignment and will instead need to use the assign method >>> dmaster = dd.from_pandas(master, npartitions=4) >>> dmaster = dmaster.assign(my_value=dmaster.original.apply(lambda x: helper(x, slave), name='my_value')) >>> ...


3

If you want to measure the speed of a particular operation by timing the whole kernel running time, you need to make that operation a major proportion of the kernel running. In your above kernel code, there are two issues. Each thread will only do the operation you want to measure once, but at the same time it will access the global memory 3 times, which ...


2

Here is the solution that squares each level before its parent levels. It first finds the levels, and then starts from the lowest level to square each level: from Queue import Queue class Node: def __init__(self, value): self.v = value self.l = None self.r = None def __repr__(self): return str(self.v) def square(...


2

from itertools import product from multiprocessing import Pool with Pool(processes=4) as pool: # assuming Python 3 pool.starmap(print, product(range(2), range(3), range(4)))


2

You can use the groupByKey(Integer numPartitions) and set the numPartitions equal to the number of distinct keys you have. But .. you will need to know how many distinct keys do you have up front. Do you have that information? Probably not. So then .. you would need to do some extra (/redundant) work. E.g. use countByKey as the first step. That ...


2

You're almost certainly better off doing this with a single thread. First, you must read the text file sequentially. There's no shortcut that will let you skip ahead and find the 500,000th line without first reading the 499,999 lines that come before it. Second, even if you could do that, the disk drive can only service a single request at a time. It can't ...


2

Looks like a job for GNU Parallel: declare -a arr=("seed_automation_data_1" "seed_automation_data_2" "seed_automation_data_3" "seed_automation_data_4") parallel --joblog - bundle exec rake db:seed:{} ::: "${arr[@]}" GNU Parallel is a general parallelizer and makes is easy to run jobs in parallel on the same machine or on multiple machines you have ssh ...


2

I would encourage you to read the https://docs.python.org/3/library/multiprocessing.html documentation, which has a great example. If you're using Python 3.x from multiprocessing import Pool def f(x): return x*x if __name__ == '__main__': with Pool(5) as p: print(p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])) If you're using python 2.7: https://docs.python.org/2.7/...


1

Whatever you write inside the closure i.e it needs to be executed on Worker gets distributed. You can read more about it here : http://spark.apache.org/docs/latest/programming-guide.html#understanding-closures-a-nameclosureslinka And as you increase the number of cores, I think it must not effect the application because if you do not specify it ! then it ...


1

You do exactly the same operation for each pixel, so you can parallelize the two first loops (the ones going through the image). You just need to move workPixel after int sourcePxTarget = i * img.Width + j; Then is becomes a thread safe local variable. Personally, I divide the images in bands (as many bands as threads), and I give one band to each thread. ...


1

I'd write it like this: await Task.WhenAll(dependencies.Where(t => t != null)); await Task.Run(() => action()); I'd make the Where(t => t != null) part an argument validation and make it illegal to pass null tasks.


1

Promise.all takes array of promises and resolves as soon as all are resolved or one of them rejects. But promises are not asynchronous by spec, actually, total opposite is true: Promise executor is executed immediately. So if all of your executors are synchronous, then your promise chain is synchronous. Maybe that helps a little bit to understand how it ...


1

Check if you are reinventing GNU Parallel: parallel -S worker1 -S worker2 ./update_OSS_internal_compiler ::: arg1 arg2 arg3 GNU Parallel is a general parallelizer and makes is easy to run jobs in parallel on the same machine or on multiple machines you have ssh access to. It can often replace a for loop. If you have 32 different jobs you want to run on 4 ...


1

Performance for .dot strongly depends on the BLAS library to which your NumPy implementation is linked. If you have a modern implementation like OpenBLAS or MKL then NumPy is already running at full speed using all of your cores. In this case dask.array will likely only get in the way, trying to add further parallelism when none is warranted, causing ...


1

Try something like this: library(doParallel) library(foreach) cl<-makeCluster(6) ## you can set up as many cores as you need/want/have here. registerDoParallel(cl) getDoParWorkers() # should be the number you registered. If not, something went wrong. df1<-data.frame(matrix(1:9, ncol = 3)) df2<-data.frame(matrix(1:9, ncol = 3)) df3<-data.frame(...


1

On an unmodified system I have successfully run 30000 processes in parallel (s/run/crawled/). If you change the /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max you can go even higher. But be aware that your system becomes very unstable when you approach /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max.


1

Are you sure this is not a job for GNU Parallel? cat file | parallel --pipe -N1 myscript_that_reads_one_line_from_stdin This way you do not need to have the temporary files at all. If your script can read more than one line (so it is in practice a UNIX filter), then this should be very close to optimal: parallel --pipepart -k --roundrobin -a file ...


1

Check if you are reinventing GNU Parallel: parallel -S worker1 -S worker2 command ::: arg1 arg2 arg3 GNU Parallel is a general parallelizer and makes is easy to run jobs in parallel on the same machine or on multiple machines you have ssh access to. It can often replace a for loop. If you have 32 different jobs you want to run on 4 CPUs, a straight ...


1

Will a BlockingCollection https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997371(v=vs.110).aspx help you? Outside your loop create the collection and a set of tasks that are trying to pull an entry from the collection. Each task should wait until a task is available, run it, then wait for another. At your call to validateAndAddToTopLineups you would try to add ...


1

You've got a Cartesian product there. It is a huge one, but this is how you'd do it: var enumerator = from p in _myPitchers from c in _myCatchers from b1 in _myBase1 from b2 in _myBase2 from b3 in _myBase3 from ss in _myShortStops from of in OutfielderCombos select new Lineup { Pitcher1 = p, ...


1

I often hit similar problems. Instead of using taskset I use nice: parallel --nice 11 ./models_test tfidf.db output/ input/ {} '{= $_+=9 =}' ::: {1..60..10} & ./models_test tfidf.db output/ input/ 61 70 wait


1

Say you have a matrix A (resp. B) in which the columns are your n vectors A1,A2,...,An (resp. B1,B2,...,Bn ), Your program would output n matrices. In order to vectorize this, you have to increase by 1 the dimensions of your matrices ( In this case 2-->3 dimensions matrices). The i-th "slice" of them at constant z will be respectively your vectors Ai and ...


1

You are looking for GNU Parallel: cat Input.txt | parallel -j 100 python status_check.py > out_file.txt GNU Parallel is a general parallelizer and makes is easy to run jobs in parallel on the same machine or on multiple machines you have ssh access to. It can often replace a for loop. If you have 32 different jobs you want to run on 4 CPUs, a straight ...


1

The test will request a browser from the hub. It is important to understand this difference with target. So the test requests a browser from the hub, the hub will check with it's registered nodes who has an available browser slot, and if a slot is available, will give this slot to your test. The hub however has nothing to do with your test suite at all, it ...



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