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55

There actually is a trick how to execute a parallel operation in a specific fork-join pool. If you execute it as a task in a fork-join pool, it stays there and does not use the common one. ForkJoinPool forkJoinPool = new ForkJoinPool(2); forkJoinPool.submit(() -> //parallel task here, for example range(1, ...


22

First, what's with this sequential execution. There's just one core, one program space, one counter. The MPU executes one instruction at a time and then moves to another, in sequence. In this system there's no inherent mechanism to make it stop doing one thing and start doing another - it's all one program, and it's entirely in hands of programmer what the ...


21

Any time you are decomposing a problem into tasks, where those tasks could be blocked on other tasks, and try and execute them in a finite thread pool, you are at risk for pool-induced deadlock. See Java Concurrency in Practice 8.1. This is unquestionably a bug -- in your code. You're filling up the FJ pool with tasks that are going to block waiting for ...


19

Here's a simple example: simple = 1 : 1 : [a + b | a <- simple, b <- simple] How would you parallelize this? How would you generalize this to any list comprehension to decide if it can be parallelized? What about any other list comprehension over a list that is infinite, sparking a new thread for each element would mean sparking infinite threads. ...


18

There are several issues going on here in parallel, as it were. The first is that solving a problem in parallel always involves performing more actual work than doing it sequentially. Overhead is involved in splitting the work among several threads and joining or merging the results. Problems like converting short strings to lower-case are small enough that ...


14

The Stream API was designed to make it easy to write computations in a way that was abstracted away from how they would be executed, making switching between sequential and parallel easy. However, just because its easy, doesn't mean its always a good idea, and in fact, it is a bad idea to just drop .parallel() all over the place simply because you can. ...


14

The parallel streams use the default ForkJoinPool which by default has as many threads as you have processors, as returned by Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors(): For applications that require separate or custom pools, a ForkJoinPool may be constructed with a given target parallelism level; by default, equal to the number of available processors. ...


14

The Console can only actually perform one Write at a time, so your second version is spending a lot of time creating multiple threads, scheduling work for each of them, and then just having all but one of them sitting around waiting on the others until they're all done. You get all of the overhead of multithreading and none of the benefits, as you're not ...


12

This problem is pretty debuggable, an uncommon luxury when you have problems with threads. Your basic tool here is the Debug + Windows + Threads debug window. Shows you the active threads and gives you a peek at their stack trace. You'll easily see that, once it gets slow, that you'll have dozens of threads active that are all stuck. Their stack trace ...


12

I would be thankful for some feedback for the following points (true/false).. Unfortunately none of the answers are either true or false. They are all "it depends" or "it's complicated". :-) 1: A thread is the lowest unit of scheduling in an OS. This is basically true. OSes schedule threads, and for the most part a Java thread corresponds to an ...


11

This answer is from monkjack, a comment from the accepted answer. However, one can miss this great answer so I'm reposting it here. implicit val ec = ExecutionContext.fromExecutor(Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10)) If you just need to change the thread pool count, just use the global executor and pass the following system properties. ...


11

Normally, this is not possible. You can do something like a `par` b `pseq` (a && b) but if b evaluates to False, a is still fully evaluated. However, this is possible with the unambiguous choice operator created by Conal Elliott for his Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) implementation. It's available on Hackage as unamb package and does ...


10

While SF provides an excellent overview of multitasking there is also some additional hardware most microcontrollers have that let them do things simultaneously. Illusion of simultaneous execution - Technically your professor is correct and updating simultaneously cannot be done. However, processors are very fast. For many tasks they can execute ...


9

A single spark is very cheap. A Spark Pool. Each invocation of par a b adds the thunk a to the (current HEC’s) Spark Pool; this thunk is called a “spark”. [1] If any HEC becomes idle, it can then check the pool and start evaluating the thunk on the top. So sparking is roughly adding a pointer to a queue. To make spark distribution cheaper and more ...


9

par is for speculative parallelism, and relies on laziness. You speculate that the unevaluated a should be computed while you're busy working on b. Later in your program you might refer to a again, and it will be ready. Here's an example. We wish to add 3 numbers together. Each number is expensive to compute. We can compute them in parallel, then add them ...


9

Your code is horribly broken. You are using a reducer function which fails the requirement that the accumulator/combiner functions be associative, stateless, and non-interfering. And a mutable Foo is not an identity for the reduction. All of these can lead to incorrect results when executed in parallel. You're also making it far harder than you need ...


9

You are not at all using any algorithmic strength of the dictionary. Ideally, you'd use a tree structure so that you can perform prefix lookups. On the other hand you are within 3.7x of your performance goal. I think you can reach that by just optimizing the constant factor in your algorithm. Don't use LINQ in perf-critical code. Manually loop over all ...


9

Rx is an API for creating and processing observable sequences. The Streams API is for processing iterable sequences. Rx sequences are push-based; you are notified when an element is available. A Stream is pull-based; it "asks" for items to process. They may appear similar because they both support similar operators/transforms, but the mechanics are ...


9

To monitor what was happening, I installed and opened Process Monitor (HT @qethanm). I also exited most of the things in my system tray like Dropbox, in order to generate less noise. (Though in the end, this didn't make a difference.) I then re-ran a simplified version of the R code in the question, directly from R GUI (instead of an IDE). ...


9

But can I abort a Task (in .Net 4.0) in the same way not by cancellation mechanism. I want to kill the Task immediately. Other answerers have told you not to do it. But yes, you can do it. You can supply Thread.Abort() as the delegate to be called by the Task's cancellation mechanism. Here is how you could configure this: class HardAborter { ...


9

What makes you think on GPU scheduling would not overcomponsate the benefits? In fact, the kind of parallelism used in GPUs is far harder to schedule: it's SIMD parallelism, i.e. a whole batch of stream processors do all essentially the same thing at a time, except each one crushes a different bunch of numbers. So, not only would you need to schedule the ...


9

In C#, generic list are not thread-safe, so you can not add a items in a parallel loop. I recommend using another class like ConcurrentBag, ConcurrentStack or ConcurrentQueue. var pages = new ConcurrentBag<string>(); Parallel.ForEach(pageNodes, node => { try { string temp = DoSomeComplicatedModificationOnNode(node); if ...


9

It seems like you should just be able to declare a Stream, and the choice of sequential/parallel execution should be handled automagically in a layer below, either by library code or the JVM itself as a function of the cores available at runtime, the size of the problem, etc. The reality is that a) streams are a library, and have no special JVM magic, ...


8

forEach() doesn't guarantee to process elements in specific order: The behavior of this operation is explicitly nondeterministic. For parallel stream pipelines, this operation does not guarantee to respect the encounter order of the stream, as doing so would sacrifice the benefit of parallelism. For any given element, the action may be performed at ...


8

Can non-concurrent collectors be safely used with a parallel stream or should I only use the concurrent versions when collecting from a parallel stream? It is safe to use a non-concurrent collector in a collect operation of a parallel stream. In the specification of the Collector interface, in the section with half a dozen bullet points, is this: ...


8

zsh does not have a concept of exporting functions. export -f somefunc will print the function definition, it will not export a function. Instead, you can rely on the fact that bash functions are exported as regular variables starting with (): export my_func='() { echo "$1"; }' parallel --gnu "my_func {}" ::: 1 2


8

These sort of situations can be quite hard to figure out. One key is to look at memory locality. Without seeing your code, it's impossible to say EXACTLY what is going wrong, but we can discuss some of the things that amke "multithreading less good": In all NUMA systems, when the memory is located with processor X and the code running on processor Y (where ...


8

All collectors, if they follow the rules in the specification, are safe to run in parallel or sequential. Parallel-readiness is a key part of the design here. The distinction between concurrent and non-concurrent collectors have to do with the approach to parallelization. An ordinary (non-concurrent) collector operates by merging sub-results. So the ...


8

Confusion exists because dictionary meanings of both these words are almost the same: Concurrent: existing, happening, or done at the same time(dictionary.com) Parallel: very similar and often happening at the same time(merriam webster). Yet the way they are used in computer science and programming are quite different. Here is my interpretation: ...


8

Streams API actually has first-class support for your requirement: setOfE.parallelStream().anyMatch(e->eval(e)); As opposed to your approach with reduce, this is guaranteed to have short-circuit evaluation and optimally leverage parallelism.



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