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178

This feature has made it into JUnit 4.11. To use change the name of parameterized tests, you say: @Parameters(name="namestring") namestring is a string, which can have the following special placeholders: {index} - the index of this set of arguments. The default namestring is {index}. {0} - the first parameter value from this invocation of the test. ...


48

Let's say that you have your category ids in an integer array and Name is a string. The trick is to create the command text to allow you to enter all of your category ids as individual parameters and construct the fuzzy match for name. To do the former, we use a loop to construct a sequence of parameter names @p0 through @pN-1 where N is the number of ...


37

Looking at JUnit 4.5, its runner clearly doesn't support that, as that logic is buried inside a private class inside the Parameterized class. You could not use the JUnit Parameterized runner, and create your own instead which would understand the concept of names (which leads to the question of how you might set a name ...). From a JUnit perspective, it ...


23

First of all, you should NEVER do SQL command compositions on a client app like this, that's what SQL Injection is. (Its OK for an admin tool that has no privs of its own, but not for a shared use application). Secondly, yes, a parametrized call to a Stored procedure is both cleaner and safer. However, as you will need to use Dynamic SQL to do this, you ...


21

If you want T in BinaryNode to be the same type as the enclosing T associated with AVLTree, remove the declaration of T in BinaryNode. If you want the T in BinaryNode to be different than the enclosing T associated with AVLTree, but you want to be able to access properties of the parent AVLTree, rename T to something else. ...


21

From what I understand: With Parameterized tests you can supply a series of static inputs to a test case. Theories are similar but different in concept. The idea behind them is to create test cases that test on assumptions rather than static values. So if my supplied test data is true according to some assumptions, the resulting assertion is always ...


20

I recently came across the same problem when using JUnit 4.3.1. I implemented a new class which extends Parameterized called LabelledParameterized. It has been tested using JUnit 4.3.1, 4.4 and 4.5. It reconstructs the Description instance using the String representation of the first argument of each parameter array from the @Parameters method. You can see ...


15

No need for SYS_CONTEXT or cursor definitions. You do need a type so that, when the SQL is parsed, it can determine which columns are going to be returned. That said, you can easily write a script that will generate type and collection type definitions for one or more tables based on the data in user_tab_columns. The closest is create table my_table ...


13

With Parameterized as a model, I wrote my own custom test runner / suite -- only took about half an hour. It's slightly different from darrenp's LabelledParameterized in that it lets you specify a name explicitly rather than relying on the first parameter's toString(). It also doesn't use arrays because I hate arrays. :) public class PolySuite extends ...


12

You need to specify a type for the ArrayList's type parameter. For generic type parameters, T is fairly common. Since the compiler doesn't know what a T is, you need to add a type parameter to MyList that can have the type passed in. Thus, you get: public class MyList<T> extends ArrayList<T> Additionally, you may want to consider implementing ...


12

You can use: JComboBox<String> box = new JComboBox<>(boxOptions); This happens because JComboBox is now a generic class.


11

There are two types of parameter, named parameters and positional parameters. You're mixing the two types and that won't work. Named parameters match a placeholder by name. Names are started with the : symbol. The parameter names are not the same as the names of the columns you happen to use them for. You supply parameter values in an associative array, ...


11

Python doesn't have (or need) "parameterized classes", so it's hard to provide examples of them in Python;-). A metaclass is simply "the class of a class": normally type (as long, in Py2, as you remember to make the class new-style by inheriting from object, or some other built-in type or other new-style class -- old-style classes are a legacy artefact in ...


11

Parameterized.class tests "parametrize" tests with a single variable, while Theories.class "parametrize" with all combinations of several variables. For examples please read: http://blogs.oracle.com/jacobc/entry/parameterized_unit_tests_with_junit http://blog.schauderhaft.de/2010/02/07/junit-theories/ http://blogs.oracle.com/jacobc/entry/junit_theories ...


11

You cannot immediately apply the TestCase attribute containing a lambda expression, i.e. the following test would be invalid: [TestCase((a, b) => a + b)] public void WillNotCompileTest(Func<double, double, double> func) { Assert.GreaterOrEqual(func(1.0, 1.0), 1.0); } What you can do, however, is to use the TestCaseSource attribute together ...


10

Yes this works by using the PowerMock Rule available if you use JUnit 4.7+.


10

Embedded SQL is parsed at compile-time. One advantage is that you catch syntax errors at compile-time too, which can prevent some types of embarrassing runtime errors. It also means that there's no way SQL injection vulnerabilities can alter your intended SQL syntax at runtime. Virtually all SQL programmers these days put SQL into strings, and have these ...


10

We do it in the following way: private Class<T> persistentClass; public Class<T> getPersistentClass() { if (persistentClass == null) { this.persistentClass = (Class<T>) ((ParameterizedType) getClass().getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0]; } return persistentClass; }


10

Here's how I solved it: Working SQL Fiddle First I have create a function which splits the string value i.e. '1,2,4,5' Split function: CREATE FUNCTION fn_Split(@text varchar(8000), @delimiter varchar(20) = ' ') RETURNS @Strings TABLE ( position int IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY, value varchar(8000) ) AS BEGIN DECLARE @index int SET @index ...


10

Just if any (else) stumples accross this question in the future: When using the Parameterized Trigger Plugin as a build step, then if the trigger is configured with the "Block until the triggered projects finish their builds" enabled, the following Environment variables are made available for further build steps: LAST_TRIGGERED_JOB_NAME="Last project ...


9

You need "%" in value of sql parameter. SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Products WHERE Category_ID IN (@categoryid1, @categoryid2) OR name LIKE @name", conn); comm.Parameters.Add("@categoryid1", SqlDbType.Int); comm.Parameters["@categoryid1"].Value = CategoryID[0]; comm.Parameters.Add("@categoryid2", SqlDbType.Int); ...


9

The tasteful approach from the client point of view (which is usually the one you want to take) is to use covariant return types which was added to support generics, as Michael Barker points out. The slightly less tasteful, but more tasteful that a cast is to add a getThis method: protected abstract T getThis(); public <T extends Foo> T eat(String ...


9

There are ways to solve this that involve creative thinking. Most obvious: Adapter Pattern You build your interface, then two adapters where each take NetClassA and the other NetClassB. Your common code stays common and the specific lives in the adapters. This works even for sealed classes. You do not dervice from NetClassA or NetClassB. I kind of want ...


9

Found my own answer. Not as easy as plugin or an already-set variable, but it works. Use the Jenkins XML API with depth=1 (very import to get the URLs fully traversed and all information available) and XPATH. Here is a sample of the URL I used: ...


8

Try UPDATE sampledates SET last_foo = COALESCE(@LastFoo,last_foo ), last_bar = COALESCE(@LastBar,last_bar ) WHERE id = @ID;


8

Frustratingly, the ParameterizedThreadStart delegate type has a signature accepting one object parameter. You'd need to do something like this, basically: // This will match ParameterizedThreadStart. private static void Bar(object x) { Bar((int)x); } private static void Bar(int x) { // do work }


8

You want apply: (apply foo "ack" (list "moo" "boo"))


8

The type parameter A and its subtype relationship to Account can be expressed as follows: trait AccountDAO[A <: Account] extends CrudRepository[A, Int]


8

Use single line SqlParameterCollection.AddWithValue Method cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@username",username.Text);


7

Yes, there is. Have a look at some of these examples: http://www.securestate.blogspot.com/2008/09/classic-asp-sql-injection-prevention_30.html http://www.userfriendlythinking.com/Blog/BlogDetail.asp?p1=7013&p2=119&p7=3001



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