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1

An alternative to Daniel's solution is to view terms such as plus(times(2,2), minus(5,3)) as expression objects supporting a set of operations, such as "evaluate" or "differentiate". This allows you to write goals such as: | ?- plus(times(2,2), minus(5,3))::evaluate(Result). Result = 6 yes The advantage is that the rules for all operations that apply to a ...


0

I'm not entirely sure I follow exactly what you are doing, but it sounds like AspectJ can help your issue. If you were to create an aspect which wraps the calls to the logger's methods, you would be able to extract the caller's method/class and override any parameters that are being sent to the actual logger (using ProceedingJoinPoint). I'm not entirely ...


0

one way maybe to use a dictionary. class Level01 { Dictionary<string,int> values; public level01() { values.Add("Boxes",3); values.Add("MaxPoints",3); values.Add("Health",3); } //indexer public int this[string s] {get{return values[s];} set {values[s] = value;}} } and use like: Level01 lv = new Level01(); somemethod(lv["Boxes"]); ...


2

You could use a Dictionary<int, Level> to lookup the object representing each level. Instead of the switch/case, you would do something like Level level = myLevelDictionary[currentLevel]; That requires you change your classes from having one class per level, to one class that represents any level, e.g.: class Level { public int Boxes { get; ...


1

I think you can modify your WHERE condition to compare against the parameter directly like WHERE People.Name = @Name AND ( People.Status1 = @Status1 OR People.Status2 = @Status2 OR People.Status3 = @Status3 )


2

Try using this logic instead: SELECT p.Name, p.Age FROM People p WHERE (@Name is null OR p.Name = @Name) AND (@status1 <> '0' and p.Status1 = @status1 or @status2 <> '0' and p.Status2 = @status2 or @status3 <> '0' and p.Status3 = @status3 ); Most people find it more difficult to understand case expressions in ...


1

I believe it's more straightforward to use ofstream, so I'll do just that. Basically everything I did was to: define outputFile as an ofstream; pass it to decode and write to it through the << operator. You could instead change redirect stardard output to your file and simply write to standard output (you didn't need to change your decode ...


0

Looks like I was able to answer my own question. The problem was that R took a lot longer to got through the mle2 calculation along with the integration of the dstable function. Log-likelihood results took less than 10 seconds for the other distributions but for some reason, it took over 45 minutes!! for the stable distribution. I only figured this out after ...


1

Rather than solving this as a monolithic task, consider separating it into two parts: Given a string, obtain a collection of tokens the string represents Given a collection of tokens, validate each position before constructing ClassA This separation insulates ClassA from the responsibility of reading a string representation. This is a good thing: it lets ...


1

for me there are two solutions : Your class parses the string Your class just receives the tokens and the parsing is done earlier. Usually, the attributes of a class must be private, or even protected. But have a direct access on these attributes OUTSIDE of the class avoids your class to control the values goin in and out. If your class is dedicated to ...


0

Click once deployment is the best solution and choose the option Application should check for updates after the application starts


1

You could have found this with 1 google query but here you go: function Change{ param( [parameter(Mandatory=$true,Position=0)] [string] $address, [parameter(Mandatory=$true)] [string] $mask, [parameter(Mandatory=$true)] [string] $gw, [int] $metric=0 ) Do Stuff } For Calling the Function: Change -address $address -mask $mask -gw $gw -metric $metric ...


0

function Change { param($addr, $mask, $gw, $metric=0) $S=$executionContext.InvokeCommand.NewScriptBlock("netsh interface ip set address name='Local Area Connection' source=static addr=$addr mask=$mask gateway=$gw gwmetric=$metric") } #To call use this, note, no commas between args, and $metric is defined 0 by default. Change ...


0

If you want a "Null, empty or white space" check, you can avoid unnecessary strimg manipulation with LTRIM and RTRIM like this. IF COALESCE(PATINDEX('%[^ ]%', @parameter), 0) > 0 RAISERROR ...


0

Try setting three different parameters in job.properties(jobname1, jobname2, jobname3), which will be used by three shell actions. Another option is to use the String EL functions in oozie to manipulate the "jobname" value at runtime. For example: Use concat(${jobname}, "first") function to append an identifier to the jobname which will differentiate each ...


0

int num = 2572; int lastdigit = num % 10; System.out.println(lastdigit); Output : 2


0

Here's an example of a POST form. As Machavity told you, it's insecure to do it this way, but it'll teach you the basics. I've put comments inside that'll tell you what's doing exactly what. <?php /* First we'll make an if statement that checks if there's actually a username set. In here you'll see "isset". This checks if the POST variable 'username' ...


1

In PHP, $_POST refers to variables that are set by form submission $_GET is used to get query string parameters , i.e. put.php?Content=200; echo $_GET['Content']; Please note that directly echoing $_GET or $_POST can open your site to being used for XSS attacks.


3

The relationship between the title of your question and the text of your question is unclear to me, and I think @false is probably right that there is a more fundamental misunderstanding about Prolog here. I don't know if this really addresses your need or not, but the alternative here is writing your own evaluator. eval(times(X,Y), Result) :- eval(X, ...


2

First, you need to understand what Prolog predicates actually describe: They are not functions, but rather relations between values. So if you want to have a predicate for addition, this needs to be a predicate with three arguments: plus(A, B, Sum). Thus in Prolog, results do not appear for free as in many other languages. Instead of plus(X, Y):- Result ...


0

That happens because: Swift provides an automatic external name for any parameter that has a default value. The automatic external name is the same as the local name, as if you had written a hash symbol before the local name in your code. Excerpt from External Names for Parameters with Default Values Normally a function (and note, a global function ...


0

This might be an overkill, but a very good method for finding a model from data is the RANSAC method. Rougly, it works this way: 1. Let M* be the best model so far. // At the begining there is no such model.) 2. Let D be the set of data points. // In your case it is a set of x-y pairs.) 3. Until a stopping condition is not met: Randomly pick a number of ...


3

You can pass a literal * by: Putting it in quotes: "*" Putting it in apostrophes: '*' Backslash escaping it: \* Those are all equivalent (in this case). The reason that didn't work is that your script has a problem: when you don't quote $1 (and $2 and $3), you are telling the shell to perform pathname expansion and word splitting on their contents. ...


0

Putting extra values in class public class MainActivity extends Activity { public final static String USERNAME = "com.example.myfirstapp.MESSAGE"; public final static String EMAIL = "com.example.myfirstapp.EMAIL"; public void registerUser(View view) { Intent intent = new Intent(this, DisplayMessageActivity.class); EditText ...


4

The reason for demanding that output parameters are passed as pointers is simple: It makes it clear at the call site that the argument is potentially going to be mutated: foo(x, y); // x and y won't be mutated bar(x, &y); // y may be mutated When a code base evolves and undergoes incremental changes that are reviewed by people who may not know ...


2

You're first question: "So, what's the point to always demand a pointer if I want to avoid the pointer to be null?" Using a pointer announces to the caller that their variable may be modified. If I am calling foo(bar), is bar going to be modified? If I am calling foo(&bar) it's clear that the value of bar may be modified. There are many examples of ...


1

They likely use it for consistency because they use output parameters both as references to existing memory (they're modifying previously initialized variables) and as actual outputs (the output arguments are assumed to be assigned by the function itself). For consistency, they use it as a way to more clearly indicate inputs vs. outputs. If you never need a ...


3

The point they are making (which I disagree with) is that say I have some function void foo(int a, Bar* b); If the b argument is optional, or it is unnecessary sometimes, you can call the function like so foo(5, nullptr); If the function was declared as void foo(int a, Bar& b); Then there is no way to not pass in a Bar. This point (emphasis ...


0

Looks like the levy function in the VGAM package is what you are looking for (click).


0

I'm not sure why the above wasn't working but I made the following changes and am all set. Hopefully the keywords here help someone else if they are making the same mistakes. First, I pulled the hash creation out into the Product model, like so: def default_features list = Hash.new features.each do |feature| list[feature.name] = ...


0

When you define a function, you don't need to write a concrete parameter name for unused parameters, i.e. #include<iostream> int foo(int a, int, int c) { std::cout<<a<<std::endl; return c; } int main() { foo(1,2,3); }


1

Open your project’s build settings. In the search field at the top, enter “unused”. You will see several matching settings under Warnings. One of them is Unused Parameters. Turn it on.


1

Because of the space, Ruby beleive "(test_cards , name)" is the first argument and complains about the missing second argument. These syntax will work display_cards(test_cards, name) display_cards test_cards, name


1

remove the space here: display_cards (test_cards , name) ^ Ruby is I think treating (test_cards, name) as a block or a struct and trying to pass it to your function display_cards as a single argument. Interestingly enough it works perfectly in jruby.


0

As a work around you can create a proxy service in WSO2 ESB, with a WSDL that have input parameters optional, and validate if they are present or not, and take action them. If the parameters are present in the request message then call the dataservice. I also I´m searching the same as you but without results.


0

Here You Go!!! <?php $url = 'http://www.IrfanAnsari.com/embedviz?q=select+col9+from+1c16ZytvOGsazT5r4borWzDSKmRy1dyeCqzOHdnWb&viz=MAP&h=false&lat=28.098107336734692&lng=68.93999515039059&t=1&z=6&l=col9&y=2&tmplt=2&hml=GEOCODABLE'; function grab_url($url) { if(!empty($url)) { $urllist=parse_url($url); ...


4

I believe that declaring the class parameter as val only has an effect on the constructor call: the parameter is copied instead of passing a reference. However in each case the class field is allocated as a val. is this correct? Not at all. If there is a val or var in the constructor, that causes a val or var of the same name to be declared in ...


0

I guess that's because Form_Load Occurs before a form is DISPLAYED for the first time. Try moving your code from Form_Load to the constructor after InitializeComponent(); or so. EDIT: To answer your question, I suggest you extract code #1 from... private void YOUR_BUTTON_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) { // move this code #1 to... } and move ...


1

Passing a reference and modifying the original variable inside the subroutine would be done like this: $text = 'hello'; convert_to_uppercase(\$text); #notice the \ before $text print $text; sub convert_to_uppercase { #perl doesn't specify arguments here ### arguments will be in @_, so @_ is now a list like ('hello') my $ref = shift; ...


3

You really shouldn't use an ampersand & when calling a Perl subroutine. It is necessary only when treating the code as a data item, for instance when taking a reference, like \&convert_to_uppercase. Using it in a call hasn't been necessary since version 4 of Perl 5, and it does some arcane things that you probably don't want. It is unusual for ...


1

The parameters for a subroutine call are contained in the array @_. Two important functions for array manipulation are shift and pop. Suppose you have a list (1, 2, 3, 4). shift removes a value from the left side of the list and returns it. my @list = ( 1, 2, 3, 4 ); my $value = shift @list; print "$value\n"; # will print "1" print "@list\n"; # ...


0

Did you choose the option "Validate Values" when you've created your parameter? If yes, probably you aren't choosing a valid value. I remember I had a problem with parameters too...and it was because the type of the parameter was incorrect. Make sure you selected the right "Value Type" for your parameter. I hope it helps. Regards, Tatan.


1

What you're trying to do here is called variable capture. In C#, you would do this by defining an inline delegate, which would do the variable capture for you: Action<int, string> delegateWithParams = ... Action delegateWithoutParams1 = delegate { delegateWithParams(7, "foo"); }; // or if you like lambda syntax: Action delegateWithoutParams2 = () ...


1

C++ has several mechanisms for this, boost::bind became std::bind, and now we have lambdas. They don't work with managed types though. Hopefully a future version of the C++/CLI compiler will add lambda functionality, until then your approach with a helper object is pretty much it (but you can genericize it to reduce code duplication. Both storing the ...


3

Arguments are passed in @_, so you'd need to look for uses of @_. For example, my ($x, $y) = @_; shift in a sub is the same as shift(@_) $_[$i] &f (but not &f()), as in sub log_warn { unshift @_, 'warn'; &log } As a sub writer, you should use these as near the top of the sub as possible to make them obvious. The last two are usually used as ...


4

Please take a look at my answer to a similar question. Perl is hyper-flexible, in that a subroutine can simply ignore excess parameters, provide defaults for missing ones, or die if the parameters aren't exactly what is expected. Perl's author, Larry Wall, is a linguist, and the rationale behind this is that subroutines behave like imperative verbs; so ...


0

Yes you can pass function callback like regular primitive variable In your case you should check param type before execution function testFunc(parameter1){ if(typeof parameter1==="undefined"){ //arguments[0] will fall here console.log("No arguments case. parameter1 not defined") } else //function check if(typeof ...


0

Arguments aren't assigned to functions, they are passed/sent/[insert other synonym here]. Anything that is an expression (any code which evaluates to some value) can be passed around. In your exemple $(".someClass").text("someText") is an expression which evaluates to a jQuery object, so you can use this unit of code as a function's argument without any ...


0

The key insight here is that a function can be treated like any other variable. For example: var i = 1; var f = function() { console.log('hello!'); }; Here f is a value, just like i is, but you can invoke it just like any other function: f(); // prints 'hello!' in the console Because it is a value, you can pass it to another function: function g(h) { ...


0

Yes it can be done , as jQuery will eveluate it and return a object.



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