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27

I may be able to help, although such beast are inevitably a bit involved. Here's a pattern I sometimes use in developing well-scoped syntax with binding and de Bruijn indexing, bottled. mkRenSub :: forall v t x y. -- variables represented by v, terms by t (forall x. v x -> t x) -> -- how to embed variables into ...


14

Let me address your questions separately. Calling forall "a lambda at the type level" is inaccurate for two reasons. First, it is the type of a lambda, not the lambda itself. Second, that lambda lives on the term level, even though it abstracts over types (lambdas on the type level exist as well, they provide what is often called generic types). Universal ...


13

The declaration of method(List<T> l) does not specify any bounds on the type T. There is no guarantee that T is Number or a subclass of Number. Therefore, the compiler can only decide that this method calls overloadedMethod(Collection<?> o). Remember: after compilation, the information about generics is not available anymore in the class files. ...


13

Use a self-type: scala> trait Foo { self => type A <: Foo {type A = self.A}} defined trait Foo scala> class Bar extends Foo { type A = Bar } defined class Bar scala> class Bar extends Foo { type A = Int } <console>:10: error: overriding type A in trait Foo with bounds <: Foo{type A = Bar.this.A}; type A has incompatible type ...


13

They are different. Most importantly, the first function is generic. In your example it probably doesn't matter, but if the type parameter affects the function's return type, it does: let UseTheStream (stream: #Stream) = stream let UseTheStreamStrict (stream: Stream) = stream let s1 = new MemoryStream() |> UseTheStream let s2 = new MemoryStream() |> ...


10

You cite the "99 lisp problems", yet Lisp does not have parametric polymorphism or static types at all. Many statically-typed languages, like Objective-C, and Java before generics, have no parametric polymorphism. The solution is to just use a type that can accept all values, which in Go is interface{}, and cast when you need to get some specific type out ...


9

You are talking about polymorphism, so use it. If you have 2 types with same or common methods and you have a function or set of functions to act on them, define an interface that describes that set of methods shared between those 2 types and : If the types you're talking about are named SPFile and SPFolder public class SPFile : IMyNewInterface { ...


8

The compiler does see a difference between them, it is just not allowed to use this difference in overloading (since erasures of Some[(Int, String) => Unit] and Some[Int => Unit] are the same and JVM doesn't allow overloading when erasures of arguments are the same). The solution is to add fake implicit arguments: class Foo() { def fooSome(block: ...


8

So, the constraint keywords, used in type or class definitions, let one "reduce the scope” of applicable types to a type parameter, so to speak. The documentation clearly announce that type expressions from both sides of the constraint equation will be unified to "refine" the types the constraint relates to. Because they are type expressions, you may use all ...


7

"Parametric polymorphism" in C++ means templates. I think that "inclusion polymorphic" in C++ means polymorphic the way the Standard refers to it: virtual methods, subclasses and the like. I think the names are clumsy and smack of academia.


7

A few remarks to complement the two already-excellent answers. First, one cannot say that forall is lambda at the type-level because there already is a notion of lambda at the type level, and it is different from forall. It appears in system F_omega, an extension of System F with type-level computation, that is useful to explain ML modules systems for ...


7

if forall is lambda ..., then what is exists Why, tuple of course! In Martin-Löf type theory you have Π types, corresponding to functions/universal quantification and Σ-types, corresponding to tuples/existential quantification. Their types are very similar to what you have proposed (I am using Agda notation here): Π : (A : Set) -> (A -> Set) ...


7

collect is made for exactly this kind of situation: def filterMe[U,T](in: List[Either[U,T]]): List[T] = in.collect{ case Right(r) => r } In fact, it's so good at this you may want to skip the def and just ins.map(DSJsonMapper.parseDsResult).collect{ case Right(r) => r }


6

Perhaps the best ending to an abstract I've read yet: "Multiplate only requires rank 3 polymorphism in addition to the normal type class mechanism of Haskell.". (Oh, only rank-3 polymorphism, no big deal!)


6

Rex's answer is possibly a little clearer, but here's a slightly shorter alternative that parses and "filters" in a single step: ins.flatMap(DSJsonMapper.parseDSResult(_).right.toOption) Here we take the right projection of each parse result and turn that into an Option (which will be None if the parse failed and Some(whatever) otherwise). Since we're ...


6

The Go way of how to return the last element of a slice is to simply write it inline as an expression. For example: var a []int ... last := a[len(a)-1] Encapsulating the simple expression a[len(a)-1] into a generic function is an unnecessary complication. Unlike Lisp, Go isn't a purely functional language. Evaluating Go based on a list of 99 Lisp ...


5

take a look at this blog from Don Syme: Equality and Comparison Constraints in F# you can think of those contraints as a form of type-classes light, normaly overriding Equals/GetHashCode and implementing IComparable is sufficient to use it in this cases. To your questions: yes the compiler will check this yes exactly, look at the F# specifications / ...


5

The term you are looking for is "parametric polymorphism", which is different from "ad-hoc polymorphism". An example of parametric polymorphism is in the type signature for Nothing: Nothing :: Maybe a The a in the type could be any conceivable type, since Nothing inhabits all Maybes. We say that a is parametrically polymorphic because it can be any ...


5

Something is not "polymorphic" if it can have only two types. That's just a disjoint union of two types, or a "sum" type. import Data.Int data Idx = I32 Int32 | I64 Int64 deriving (Show) readId 4 _ = I32 0x12345678 readId _ _ = I64 0x1234567812345678 idSize (I32 _) = 4 idSize _ = 8 main :: IO () main = do let input = () -- this would ...


5

You can do this in scala with something that acts like a typeclass using implicits. For example: import scala.language.higherKinds trait TargetingRelation[A[_], B] class Business class Person // Using explicitly declared implicit parameter: class Post[T](implicit ev: TargetingRelation[Post, T]) // Using a "context bound". The syntax is a little hairy ...


5

The A: Foo notation for context bounds is only a shortcut for asking for an implicit value parameter of type Foo[A]. Since traits do not have constructor value parameters, you can not use this with a trait: trait Foo[A] trait Bar[A: Foo] // "error: traits cannot have type parameters with context bounds..." Whereas in classes it's possible: class Bar[A: ...


4

This is exactly what Boost.PointerContainer does, check its implementation. Basically what it does is implement the specialization for void*, and have any other implementation forward to it static_casting the parameters in and out.


4

Probably because the mechanism is "too mechanic", so much that it stops being useful in the sense that polymorphism is supposed to be useful. Also since there's no easy way of extending a polymorphic function after the fact. In C++, you could trivially do this: Matrix4x4 a, b, c; a = ...; /* Initialize matrices. */ b = ...; c = a + b; /* Use overloaded ...


4

If you look at the inferred type for decode_encode :t decode_encode > decode_encode :: ((BTAlg BT -> (BTAlg z -> z) -> z) -> t) -> t it's clear that GHC has lost quite a bit of polymorphism. I'm not completely sure of the details here—this code requires ImpredicativeTypes to compile which is usually where my understanding starts to break ...


3

As ATaylor says, just extract the common stuff from both functions and get something like int common_stuff_for_permserver(... all common params ...) { .... } int pkg_permserver(...) { /// nothing to add here return common_stuff_for_permserver( ... all params ... ); } int pkg_permserver_ip(...) { /// check for errors from common stuff ...


3

I think by 'Parametric' it refers to method/function overloading - we can determine what method is to be used at compile time by looking at the datatype of it's parameters. And by 'inclusion' it means method/function overriding - in a parent sub-class relation, if both parent and child class have the same function then it would be determined at runtime ...


3

You can use datatypes to encode "union types". Here is an example: (declare-sort S1) (declare-sort S2) (declare-datatypes () ((S1-S2-Int (WRAP-S1 (S1-Value S1)) (WRAP-S2 (S2-Value S2)) (WRAP-Int (Int-Value Int))))) (declare-const a S1) (declare-const b S2) (declare-const c Int) ...


3

struct Node { struct Node *next; void *data; }; void *getLastItem(struct Node*); ... This is common for C, but not for C++. In C++ it usually looks like this: template<typename T> struct Node { struct Node *next; T data; }; T& getLastItem(const Node&); ... Note the important difference -- the C version has another level ...


3

Change public List<T> getX(SPListItemCollection itemCollection, List<T> itemList, Report RO, WebpartSettings WPS) to public List<T> getX<T>(SPListItemCollection itemCollection, List<T> itemList, Report RO, WebpartSettings WPS) Have a closer look at how Generic Methods (C# Programming Guide) does it.


3

It's because C++ templates can be specialized. That means that just because there's a main definition: template<typename T> class Foo { Foo(T x) { } }; and clearly int will be accepted by Foo<int>(int), it's completely possible that there's also a specialized definition template<> class Foo<Foobar> { Foo(int x) { } }; ...



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