New answers tagged

0

As mentioned in the comments you cannot directly ssh into windows. so to come back on your initial requirement : Running a script after I create an instance I would not do that from your python script but instead have script on the ec2 instance and have them automatically running on ec2 instance startup You can have user data script that will run on your ...


0

There is sshpass for this but I would always go with public keys. But if public keys is something you can not do, then sub-process in Python: sshpass -pfoobar ssh -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no user@host command_to_run This is tool url: https://sourceforge.net/projects/sshpass/


0

Found my mistake! remote_bind_address=('10.160.1.24', 5432) should be remote_bind_address=('127.0.0.1', 5432),


0

You could use the SSHTunnel library as follows: from sshtunnel import SSHTunnelForwarder #Run pip install sshtunnel from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker #Run pip install sqlalchemy with SSHTunnelForwarder( ('10.160.1.24', 22), #Remote server IP and SSH port ssh_username = "<usr>", ssh_password = "<pwd>", remote_bind_address=('...


0

the problem was with the "read" statement Should have been: z=stdout.read()


0

Finally I got the solution. Thanks for the hints from @Burhan Khalid. s = paramiko.SSHClient() s.set_missing_host_key_policy(paramiko.AutoAddPolicy()) s.connect("XXX.XXX.XX",22,username="NAME",password='PW',timeout=4) sftp = s.open_sftp() stdin, stdout, stderr = s.exec_command('cd /home/image; ls -1t | head -1') for line in stdout.read().splitlines(): ...


2

Here a solution: import numpy as np ... sftp = s.open_sftp() with sftp.open('/home/frame/image.jpg') as f: img = cv2.imdecode(np.fromstring(f.read(), np.uint8), 1) cv2.imshow("image", img) cv2.waitKey(0)


0

import paramiko ssh=paramiko.SSHClient() ssh.set_missing_host_key_policy(paramiko.AutoAddPolicy()) ssh.connect(hostname,username=username,password=password) stdin,stdout,stderr = ssh.exec_command(command) for line in iter(lambda: stdout.readline(2048), ""): print(line) The above code helped. I got this answer suggestion from get output from a paramiko ...


0

I doubt this has anything to do with different extensions in a folder. The code in paramiko's sftp_client.py:putfo() reads at the end: s = self.stat(remotepath) if s.st_size != size: raise IOError('size mismatch in put! %d != %d' % (s.st_size, size)) I had a similar issue and it turned out that the remote filesystem was full and thus ...


0

For empty passwords (needless to say this is not recommended in terms of security) you have to explicitly set password="" in the run() call: ssh.connect("IP", username = "root", password="", look_for_keys=False, allow_agent=False)


0

I've solved it with the switch -a, --no_agent As Fabric help says it forces not using the running SSH agent


0

UnicodeEncodeError while calling .decode() on Python 2 indicates that the input is Unicode and therefore Python tries to encode it first using sys.getdefaultencoding() that should be ASCII on Python 2 before passing it to .decode() method. Drop .decode('utf8') call—value[0] is already Unicode. Unrelated: do not use string formatting, to create sql ...


2

First, you are missing a quote at the end of your string. The second problem is that you can't use quotes inside a string like that. r'some'thing' won't work while r'some"thing' will work. Since you have quotes in quotes inside the string use a triple-quoted string instead: r"""some"thi'ng""" So a working version of your string would be: command = ...


0

Take a look at this demo for the paramiko package. After connecting to the server, like in the demo, this is how I would edit the remote file: with sftp.open("yourfiletoedit", "rb") as f: data = f.read() # modify the data of the file (this depends on the format wich was not specified) with sftp.open("yourfiletoedit", "wb") as f: f.write(data)


0

You can do: client.exec_command(..., get_pty=True). This will make paramiko allocate a pseudo terminal, similar to ssh.


1

A quick fix: ssh = paramiko.SSHClient() ssh.known_hosts = None ... ... The bug was fixed here.


1

This is a known bug and the fix was released to version 1.12.1; you seem to be using 1.12.0. Try upgrading to the latest release: pip install --upgrade paramiko


0

Use .decode('utf8') to turn it into a unicode type: >>> cmd="echo ö" >>> type(cmd) <type 'str'> >>> cmd_unicode=cmd.decode('utf8') >>> type(cmd_unicode) <type 'unicode'> PS: Unicode handling differs between Python 2 and 3.


0

You can also pip show paramiko Output would look like this pip show paramiko --- Name: paramiko Version: 1.15.2 Location: /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages Requires: pycrypto, ecdsa


1

Your question has two parts: How to view the content of a zip file from the command line How to execute remote commands and get the output using python&paramiko First things first: How to list the content of a zip file on the console. less can look into zip files, so in your case, executing less example.gz.2016 should give you a list of files inside ...


0

Also, I faced with the following errors like: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\VC\BIN\cl.exe /c /nologo /Ox /MD /W3 /GS- /DNDEBUG -IC:\Python27-x86\include -IC:\Python27-x86\PC /Tcbuild\temp.win32-2.7\Release_openssl.c /Fobuild\temp.win32-2.7\Release\build\temp.win32-2.7\Release_openssl.obj _openssl.c build\temp.win32-2.7\Release_openssl....


0

I've finally found the solution for this. Thanks NepCoder! I manually download the libffi-devel from page https://pkgs.org/centos-6/centos-x86_64/libffi-devel-3.0.5-3.2.el6.x86_64.rpm.html. Then using 'rpm -ivh libffi-devel-3.0.5-3.2.el6.x86_64.rpm' to install it on my VM. Everything works fine after that. I guess my yum repo may have something wrong.


0

When compiling a python program, I tend to use cxfreeze instead of py2exe (use the command pip install CX_Freeze from the windows command prompt), where you can use this code to compile the program: cxfreeze "Path\To\File.py" --target-dir "Path\to\exe\file\" Path\To\File.py is the directory tree to the python file you are trying to compile Path\to\exe\...


0

There is something wrong with the accepted answer, it sometimes (randomly) brings a clipped response from server. I do not know why, I did not investigate the faulty cause of the accepted answer because this code worked perfectly for me: import paramiko ip='server ip' port=22 username='username' password='password' cmd='some useful command' ssh=paramiko....


0

Both cases are network failures, one is that it didn't work from start, the other one because it failed later. In the end there is no much difference between them. It is up to you to decide how your code behaves in this case. The usual approach is to retry by inserting a growing timeout. The most famous algorithm for this is called Exponential backoff.


0

Take a look at example and do in similar way (sorce from http://jessenoller.com/2009/02/05/ssh-programming-with-paramiko-completely-different/): ssh.connect('127.0.0.1', username='jesse', password='lol') stdin, stdout, stderr = ssh.exec_command( "sudo dmesg") stdin.write('lol\n') stdin.flush() data = stdout.read....



Top 50 recent answers are included