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56

I've come up with a Haskell solution that is 30× faster than the Haskell solution you posted (with my concocted test expression). Major changes: Change Parsec/String to Attoparsec/ByteString In the fact function, change read & many1 digit to decimal Made the chainl1 recursion strict (remove $! for the lazier version). I tried to keep everything else ...


35

It is a quite cool idea, and I liked it; it was especially useful to really learn how to use C++ templates. But their documentation recommends the usage of spirit for small to medium-size parsers. A parser for a full language would take ages to compile. I will list three reasons. Scannerless parsing. While it's quite simpler, when backtracking is required ...


26

I'm currently working on the next version of FParsec (v. 0.9), which will in many situations improve performance by up to a factor of 2 relative to the current version. [Update: FParsec 0.9 has been released, see http://www.quanttec.com/fparsec ] I've tested Jon's F# parser implementation against two FParsec implementations. The first FParsec parser is a ...


23

In boost 1.41 a new version of Spirit is being released, and it beats of pants off of spirit::classic: After a long time in beta (more than 2 years with Spirit 2.0), Spirit 2.1 will finally be released with the upcoming Boost 1.41 release. The code is very stable now and is ready for production code. We are working hard on finishing the ...


20

This sounds like a great personal project. You'll learn a lot about how the basic parts of a compiler work. I would skip trying to use a parser generator; if this is for your own edification, you'll learn more by doing it all from scratch. The way such systems work is a formalization of how we understand natural languages. If I give you a sentence: "The ...


20

The major reason for this is that most LL(k) parsers that are written in functional languages are just implemented using parser combinators, because the easiest path to generate a parser combinator library is recursive descent. Haskell's parsec, attoparsec, and polyparse and Scala's stock parser combinators all produce what are effectively LL(*) parsers. ...


20

External vs internal DSL The parser specification format for Happy is an external DSL, whereas with Parsec you have the full power of Haskell available when defining your parsers. This means that you can for example write functions to generate parsers, use Template Haskell and so on. Precedence rules With Happy, you can use precedences to simplify your ...


19

ANTLR (nothing else to say)


19

Linux systems have pdftotext which I had reasonable success with. By default, it creates foo.txt from a give foo.pdf. That said, the text mining packages may have converters. A quick rseek.org search seems to concur with your crantastic search.


19

A quick few comments. GLR is great if you want a parse tree/forest and don't mind black boxes. It lets u type in whatever CFG you want at the cost of checking for ambiguities at parse time via exhaustive testing instead of resolving LR/LALR conflicts statically. Some say that's a good trade. Ira's DMS tool or Elkhoud, which has a free C++ grammar, are ...


18

You cannot specify semantic predicates in an Xtext grammar. Furthermore it's not possible to include arbitrary actions (read: target language code blocks) with Xtext. The only supported target platform is Java. The good news is, that Xtext gains great benefit by inducing these constraints, e.g. you'll get an unparser that allows to serialize arbitrary ...


18

I work with both MATLAB (the $$$$ version of Octave) and Mathematica fairly regularly, and I'm pretty damn confident that it is impossible to implement an parser/porter that automatically converts from Mathematica to the other. For starters, MATLAB/Octave does not support pattern matching or term re-writing or functional programming, all of which are the ...


17

For me, the biggest problem is that expressions in Spirit, as seen by compiler or debugger, are rather long (I copied below a part of one expression in Spirit Classic). These expressions scare me. When I work on a program that uses Spirit, I'm afraid to use valgrind or to print backtrace in gdb. ...


17

That's basically it. Parser generators transform a grammar into a source file that can be used to recognize strings that are members of the language defined by the grammar. Often, but not always, a parser generator requires a lexical analyzer to break text down into tokens before it does its work. Lex and Yacc are classic examples of a paired lexical ...


16

I think the big "problem" with PEGs is that they don't fit into the normal taxonomy of grammars as they operate in a fundamentally different way. Normal grammars are "backwards" in the sense that they describe all the possible sentences (programs) that can be generated. PEGs describe how to parse--they come at the problem from the other end. In my view this ...


13

Here is what I don't like about it: the documentation is limited. There is one big web page where "everything" is explained, but the current explanations lack in details. poor AST generation. ASTs are poorly explained and, even after hitting your head against the wall to understand how the AST modifiers work, it's difficult to obtain an easy to manipulate ...


13

Reasons we are using Lemon in our firmware project are: Small size of generated code and memory footprint. It produces the smallest parser I found (I compared parsers of similar complexity generated by flex, bison, ANTLR, and Lemon); Excellent support of embedded systems: Lemon doesn't depend on standard library, you can specify external memory management ...


12

Regex is good to use in a compiler, but only for recognizing tokens (i.e. no recursive structures). The classic way of writing a compiler is having a lexical analyzer for recognizing tokens, a syntax analyzer for recognizing structure, a semantic analyzer for recognizing meaning, an intermediate code generator, an optimizer, and last a target code ...


12

There's also Dan Spiewak's implementation of GLL parser combinators.


12

In a nutshell, parser combinators are slow for lexing. There was a Haskell combinator library for building lexers (see "Lazy Lexing is Fast" Manuel M. T. Chakravarty) - as the tables were generated at runtime, there wasn't the hassle of code generation. The library got used a bit - it was initially used in one of the FFI preprocessors, but I don't think it ...


12

Negating can occur inside lexer and parser rules. Inside lexer rules you can negate characters, and inside parser rules you can negate tokens (lexer rules). But both lexer- and parser rules can only negate either single characters, or single tokens, respectively. A couple of examples: lexer rules To match one or more characters except lowercase ascii ...


11

Not easily, because a successful match is not retried. Consider, for example: object X extends RegexParsers { def p = ("a" | "aa" | "aaa" | "aaaa") ~ "ab" } scala> X.parseAll(X.p, "aaaab") res1: X.ParseResult[X.~[String,String]] = [1.2] failure: `ab' expected but `a' found aaaab ^ The first match was successful, in parser inside parenthesis, so ...


11

You don't need Mathematica parser to port. You need to write your porting program in Mathematica and reuse the Mathematica's own parser. This is along the same direction as SymbolicC. If I were you, I would construct some Mathematica sub-language (call it SymbolicOctave), with completely inert heads, and then write a function called say ToOctaveCodeString. ...


11

It's worth noting that Scala's standard parser combinators are not LL, nor are Packrat combinators LALR. Parser combinators are a form of recursive descent with infinite backtracking. You can think of them a bit like "LL(*)". The class of languages supported by this technique is precisely the class of unambiguous context-free languages, or the same class ...


10

I would recommend ANTLR, primarily because of its output generation capabilities via StringTemplate. What is better is that Terence Parr's book on the same is by far one of the better books oriented towards writing compilers with a parser generator. Then you have ANTLRWorks which enables you to study and debug your grammar on the fly. To top it all, the ...


10

Two others: Bryan Ford's Parsing Expression Grammars (PEG) require no scanner. Efficient, lazy "packrat parser" is optional. I've had nothing but good experience with the Lua LPEG version, which compiles to an efficient bytecode machine. Quite practical. YAKKER looks very intriguing although it is still clearly in a pre-release state. They are using ...


10

While Ragel is based on regular expressions, it's not just a regex FSM generator. It allows recursion using an additional call/return syntax, as well as other features which allow parsing non-regular languages. So while Ragel does generate FSMs, it allows generating multiple different FSMs and provides mechanisms for jumping between them at arbitrary points, ...


10

There are two basic solutions to this kind of problem. Define the action so it can be executed safely multiple times, Change the syntax so the action is only executed once. In this case, I would choose a hybrid approach. Use actions to record the start and ending positions of a name: these actions can be executed safely many times since they just record ...


10

I've been building parser generators and parsers since 1969. Recursive descent, YACC and JavaCC are the typical answers you hear. These are your grandpa's parser generators, and suffer from limitations in the grammars they will accept. Invariably, (esp on Stack Overflow), some poor soul asks "how do I solve this shift/reduce" problem (for LR parser ...


9

Have a look at JavaCC, a language parser for Java. It's very easy to use and get the hang of



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