Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

100

You cannot have two partial classes referring to the same class in two different assemblies (projects). Once the assembly is compiled, the meta-data is baked in, and your classes are no longer partial. Partial classes allows you to split the definition of the same class into two files.


68

From MSDN -Partial Classes and Methods: All partial-type definitions meant to be parts of the same type must be defined in the same assembly and the same module (.exe or .dll file). Partial definitions cannot span multiple modules.


65

I use . separation - for example EmployeeController.SomeSpecialBehaviour.cs. I also link it into the project tree via "dependentUpon" or whatever it is in the csproj, so that it nests under the file (in solution explorer) neatly. You have to do that by hand (edit the csproj) or with an addin, though; for example: <Compile Include="Program.cs" /> ...


51

I had a similar prolem, with my generated code being created by a dbml file (I'm usng Linq-to-SQL classes). In the generated class it calls a partial void called OnCreated() at the end of the constructor. Long story short, if you want to keep the important constructor stuff the generated class does for you (which you probably should do), then in your ...


34

C# does support the feature of partial methods. These allow a partial class definition to forward declare a method that another part of the partial class can then optionally define. Partial methods have some restrictions: they MUST be of void type (no return) they CANNOT accept out parameters, they can however accept ref parameters they CANNOT be virtual ...


29

Partial classes are handy when using code generation. If you want to modify a generated class (rather than inheriting from it) then you run the risk of losing your changes when the code is regenerated. If you are able to define your extra methods etc in a separate file, the generated parts of the class can be re-created without nuking your hand-crafted code. ...


28

You can't. From here ... Using the partial keyword indicates that other parts of the class, struct, or interface can be defined within the namespace Must be in the same namespace. Per comment: Here's an article that discusses defining a namespace cross multiple assemblies. From there ... Strictly speaking, assemblies and namespaces are ...


24

This is not possible. Partial classes are essentially parts of the same class; no method can be defined twice or overridden, and that includes the constructor. You could call a method in the constructor, and only implement it in the other part file.


23

It allows you to split the definition of your class into two or more separate files. See this MSDN article, "Partial Class Definitions" for more information: It is possible to split the definition of a class or a struct, or an interface over two or more source files. Each source file contains a section of the class definition, and all parts are combined ...


21

Some of differences that will determine whether you want to use a Partial Class or an Extension Method are Partial Class Only works against classes in the same project/assembly Target class has to be marked as partial Has access to the Target class' fields and protected members Target must be a class implementation Extension Method Can be applied ...


20

Automatically implemented properties can be initialized in the class constructor, but not on the propery itself. public SomeModel { IsSomething = false; SomeList = new List<string>(); } ...or you can use a field-backed property (slightly more work) and initialize the field itself... private bool _IsSomething = false; public bool IsSomething ...


17

Partial methods have to be completely resolvable at compile time. If they are not there at compile time, they are completely missing from the output. The entire reason partial methods work is that removing them has no impact on the API or program flow outside of the one line calling site (which, also, is why they have to return void). When you add a ...


17

Partials are not for spanning assemblies. If you need to add to your class for a more specific type of usage, you should create a derived class: public class MyFoo { public string BasicProperty {get;set;} } public class MySpecificFoo : MyFoo { public string AnotherProperty {get;set;} } In your project requiring the more specific type of MyFoo, ...


17

Partial classes should be used in code generation scenarios. Since the generated file might get overwritten at any time, one uses partial classes to write into the non-generated file. Additionally, partials will only work if they are part of the same assembly - they cannot cross assembly boundaries. If these are not your constraints, you can and should ...


16

Partial classes have nothing to do with object inheritance. Partial classes are just a way of splitting the source code that defines a class into separate files (this is for example done when you create a new form in your Windows Forms application - one file is "your" code, another file .designer.cs contains the code that VS2008 manages for you).


16

When you have to autogenerate a portion of those classes and manually write the rest of the content of the classes. This is so that you can put the machine-generated content in one file and hand-coded code in another file. The advantage of doing so is that when you have to regenerate the source code, your hand-coded portion won't get wiped out. This is ...


16

On source file splitting No. Java source codes can not be split across multiple files. From the Wikipedia article Comparison of Java and C Sharp The Sun Microsystems Java compiler requires that a source file name must match the only public class inside it, while C# allows multiple public classes in the same file, and puts no restrictions on the file ...


15

Partial classes are primarily for code-generator usage, such as designers - but I use the approach you have cited - in particular when an object implements multiple (non-trivial) interfaces, I find it useful to break it up 1 file per interface implementation. I also commonly have a file for the static methods, which are usually different enough from instance ...


14

For a class called Logic, I'd probably go for Logic.something.cs (where "something" is different for each file). This would be in the same style as the partial classes that Visual Studio generates (eg. the .designer.cs files for forms)


13

In response to your comment on the question, the Linq-To-Sql classes are generated as partial. This means you can have separate code files with the same class names declared as partial to add the extra properties you want. E.g. Your Ling-To-Sql designer class will be: public partial class Car { .... lots of auto generated stuff .... } You can have ...


13

XSD decorates all generated classes with DebuggerStepThroughAttribute, which prevents the debugger from stopping in a method/class marked with this attribute. To solve this: Either search and replace all occurences of DebuggerStepThrough attribute Or, In Visual Studio, go to Tools - Options..., scroll to Debugging/General and uncheck the box next to ...


13

You can't have a partial class span assemblies: All partial-type definitions meant to be parts of the same type must be defined in the same assembly and the same module (.exe or .dll file). Partial definitions cannot span multiple modules. MSDN On Partial Classes


12

It is in part to support scenarios (WebForms, WinForms, LINQ-to-SQL, etc) mixing generated code with programmer code. There are more reasons to use it. For example, if you have big classes in large, unwieldy files, but the classes have groups of logically related methods, partial classes may be an option to make your file sizes more manageable.


12

Using grailsApplication.getArtefacts("Domain") you get a list of GrailsDomainClass instances that hold meta-information regarding the domain class. The domain class itself is returned by Calling getClazz(). In short: grailsApplication.getArtefacts("Domain")*.clazz returns a complete list of the existing domain classes.


12

Looks like I figured out a different way similar to the link above using MetadataTypeAttribute: namespace MyApp.BusinessObjects { [MetadataTypeAttribute(typeof(SomeClass.Metadata))]{ public partial class SomeClass { internal sealed class Metadata { private Metadata() { } [Required] ...


12

If you don't specify the access modifier in a part of a partial class, it uses the same access modifier as the other part. Relevant part from the C# 5 spec: ยง10.2.2 When a partial type declaration includes an accessibility specification (the public, protected, internal, and private modifiers) it must agree with all other parts that include an ...


11

Are the two partial classes in the same namespace? That could be an explanation.


11

No. They are compiled to the same IL as if they weren't partial. It's a purely compile-time thing - the CLR doesn't even know that they were ever partial. Note that with partial methods introduced into C# 3, the method doesn't even get emitted in the IL unless it's implemented in one of the files. Both the calls and the declaration get stripped out by the ...


11

You cannot have a partial class in multiple namespaces. Classes of the same name in different namespaces are by definition different classes.


11

No. Partial classes are a purely language feature. When an assembly is compiled, the files are combined to create the type. It isn't possible to spread the files out into different assemblies. Depending on what you want to do, though, you might be able to use extension methods to accomplish what you need.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible