Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

When in doubt, pass by value. Now, you should only rarely be in doubt. Often values are expensive to pass and give little benefit. Sometimes you actually want a reference to a possibly mutating value stored elsewhere. Often, in generic code, you don't know if copying is an expensive operation, so you err on the side of not. The reason why you should ...


11

EDIT: Code is available here: https://github.com/acmorrow/stringview_param I've created some example code which appears to demonstrate that pass-by-value for string_view like objects results in better code for both callers and function definitions on at least one platform. First, we define a fake string_view class (I didn't have the real thing handy) in ...


10

Putting aside philosophical questions about the signaling value of const&-ness versus value-ness as function parameters, we can take a look at some ABI implications on various architectures. http://www.macieira.org/blog/2012/02/the-value-of-passing-by-value/ lays out some decision making and testing done by some QT folks on x86-64, ARMv7 hard-float, ...


10

n is local to x and first it is set to the same reference as global a. The right hand side n + 2 is then evaluated to be a number (primitive). The left hand side of the assignment, n, is never evaluated, it is just an identifier there. So our local variable is now set to the primitive value of the right hand side. The value referenced by a is never actually ...


5

In addition to what have already been said here in favour of passing by value, modern C++ optimizers struggle with reference arguments. When the body of the callee is not available in the translation unit (the function resides in a shared library or in another translation unit and link-time optimization is not available) the following things happen: The ...


5

Here are my rules of thumb for passing variables to functions: If the variable can fit inside the processor's register and will not be modified, pass by value. If the variable will be modified, pass by reference. If the variable is larger than the processor's register and will not be modified, pass by constant reference. If you need to use pointers, pass ...


5

When you did, nonZeros = lastVal; You assigned the reference of lastVal to nonZeros (and yes, nonZeros became a pointer that simply pointed to lastVal). That's not a copy. You could use System.arraycopy((Object src, int srcPos, Object dest, int destPos, int length) like System.arraycopy(lastVal, 0, nonZeros, 0, nonZeros.length);


4

Use: void assignment(int* (&x)[5]) ... edit: for the comment "if the length... wasn't standard...", you can use a template: template<int N> void assignment(int* (&x)[N]) ... The compiler will automatically deduce N.


4

Button is a reference type, so even though you are not passing by reference, you are passing a reference (by value). In other words, a copy of the object is not created, a "pointer" (to use the C++ term) to it is passed to the function. Thus, when you change its properties, those changes are reflected in the original object. Note that assigning the ...


4

List like all reference types, is passed as a reference to the object, and not a copy of it. Note that this is very different from saying it is passed by reference, as that would imply assignment of the parameter propagates to the caller, which it does not It does means that modifications to the object (such as those performed by RemoveAt) will ...


4

When you compute n + 2 this results in a new "native number" even if n is indeed a Number object instance. Assigning to n then just changes what the local variable n is referencing and doesn't change the Number object instance. You can see that with n = new Number(10); console.log(typeof n); // ---> "object" console.log(n + 2); // ---> ...


4

The wrapper types are immutable so you're creating new (local) references there. For the behavior you expect you can pass an array (note that arrays are Object instances in Java). public static void main(String[] args) { boolean[] arr = { true, false }; System.out.println(arr[0] + " " + arr[1]); func1(arr); System.out.println(arr[0] + " " + ...


3

Since you're taking by value my_class becomes const-qualified. You have three options to fix it: Add const to your method: void my_method(const state_type &x, const double t) const Capture by reference: [&](const state_type &x, const double t) { .. } Or make the lambda mutable: [=](const state_type &x,const double t) mutable { .. }


3

Whether pass by value or const& is appropriate depends, obviously what's done next with the object. Especially when a copy of an object is needed in some form and the objects being passed are likely to originate from temporary objects, using pass by value is probably preferable: when passing by value the compiler is allowed to elide the copy. When ...


3

This won't work because Java has pass by value, not pass by reference. When you declare int[] s = null; then you have a (null) reference to an int[]. But when you pass s to another method, what happens is that a new variable (let's call it x) is created, and the reference s is copied into it. Any changes to what x references will also change what s ...


3

A value is a value and a const reference is a const reference. If the object is not immutable then the two are NOT equivalent concepts. Yes... even an object received via const reference can mutate (or can even be destroyed while you're still have a const reference in your hands). const with a reference only says what can be done using that reference, it ...


3

Iterators and references to elements are invalidated, but not container itself. It's normal code.


3

You cannot return inout value. Because the compiler cannot guarantee the lifetime of the value. You have unsafe way, like this: var a = [1, 2] var b = [3, 4] func arrayToPick(i:Int) -> UnsafeMutablePointer<[Int]> { if i == 0 { return withUnsafeMutablePointer(&a, { $0 }) } else { return ...


3

You cannot pass by reference to ruby. On the other hand, String in ruby is not immutable, so using << actually changes the string you are passing - so your code actually works as you wanted it to: class Remote::CheckPart def check(warning) warning << "WARNING DUE TO SOME EVENT!" end end func=Remote::CheckPart.new() warning="" ...


3

In this line of code: deviceList = App.devices; you are not copying the list, but creating another reference to it. To make a shallow copy of the list you can use for example: ArrayList constructor which accepts Collection as a parameter and makes copy. So it should be like that: private List<Device> deviceList = new ArrayList(App.devices);


2

deviceList = App.devices; does not create a new object but it just points on the App.devices object. You could use ArrayList deviceList = new ArrayList(App.devices). This one will instatiate a new object ArrayList and it will not effect your static list object. However, keep in mind that any change on your object Device will be applied on both on your ...


2

The code is not using threads, but processes which does not share memory. Use threads: from threading import Thread, Lock # <---- def f(l, i, n): l.acquire() i.append(n) l.release() print "in:", i if __name__ == '__main__': lock = Lock() i = [] for num in range(10): p = Thread(target=f, args=(lock, i, num)) # ...


2

Types of Things in Swift The rule is: Class instances are reference types (i.e. your reference to a class instance is effectively a pointer) Functions are reference types Everything else is a value type; "everything else" simply means instances of structs and instances of enums, because that's all there is in Swift. Arrays and strings are struct ...


2

Since it doesn't make the slightest difference which one you use in this case, this seems just to be a debate about egos. This is not something that should hold up a code review. Unless someone measures the performance and figures out that this code is time critical, which I very very much doubt.


2

In C# the parameter are passed by value. This mean that when you pass a parameter to a method, a copy of the parameter is passed. C# have types by value (like int) and by reference (like any class). C# contains an stack (when push all varaibles) and a Heap. The value of the value types are pushing directly in this stack, while the reference of the reference ...


2

The reason why you get this error is the end function. If you take a closer look at the PHP Documentation you will see that end takes a reference which is implied by the ampersand. PHP can only reference variables but not on-the-fly values. To overcome this you would have to do the following: $exploded = explode('.',$_FILES['image']['name']); ...


2

You can use angular.extend() or jQuery.extend() to copy only the original object's own properties. i.e. shallow copy var json = angular.extend({}, data); json.foo = data.foo.bar; json.id = data.baz; delete json.baz; or var json = angular.extend({}, data, { foo: data.foo.bar, id: data.baz }); delete json.baz; Note that the following won't work ...


2

Let me try to answer it with examples: function modify(obj) { // modifying the object itself // though the object was passed as reference // it behaves as pass by value obj = {c:3}; } var a = {b:2} modify(a); console.log(a) // Object {b: 2} function increment(obj) { // modifying the value of an attribute // working on the same ...


2

Use phpinfo() to check if register_globals is set to "off". It sounds like it might be set to "on", in which case $_SESSION["uid"] would be the same as $uid. In PHP, why are my session variables persisted as references? http://bytes.com/topic/php/answers/759731-register_globals-off-session-side-effect


2

First of all, new Object(o.getInnerObject()) won't compile, since Object doesn't have a matching constructor. Assuming you replace it with new OuterObject (o.getInnerObject());, the new instance of OuterObject would contain the same instance of InnerObject that o contains, since the constructor of OuterObject doesn't create a copy of the InnerObject ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible