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14

qalter jobid -l walltime=X You can see the qalter docs here NOTE: fixed the link


12

LD_LIBRARY_PATH is not exported automatically to MPI processes, spawned by mpirun. You should use mpirun -x LD_LIBRARY_PATH ... to push the value of LD_LIBRARY_PATH. Also make sure that the specified path exists on all nodes in the cluster and that libarmadillo.so.3 is available everywhere.


9

One increasingly common approach in High Performance Computing (HPC) is hybrid MPI/OpenMP programs. I.e. you have N MPI processes, and each MPI process has M threads. This approach maps well to clusters consisting of shared memory multiprocessor nodes. Changing to such a hierarchical parallelization scheme obviously requires some more or less invasive ...


9

The admin finally got back. To get a list of queues on our hpc system, the command is: $ qstat -q


8

They just need to be comma-separated: qsub -v var1="val1",var2=1,var3=val3 script.csh For your example that'd be: qsub -v par1='Cassie_score',par2=cassieFile.txt,par3='100,200,300,' myScript.csh Just note that this wouldn't move cassieFile.txt to the node that will run the job, so cassieFile.txt would need to be a path to a location on a shared ...


7

I haven't worked with MPI, but if it's like other IPC libraries I've seen that hide whether other threads/processes/whatever are on the same or different machines, then it won't be able to guarantee shared memory. Yes, it could handle shared memory between two nodes on the same machine, if that machine provided shared memory itself. But trying to share ...


7

If the replacement of the executable happens atomically with the rename() system call, then it should work such that the running program keeps using the old executable. OTOH if the replacement happens by writing bits and pieces into the existing executable, the running executable might be affected. FWIW, this has nothing to do with fortran, pbs, nor torque, ...


5

awk qstat | awk '$6 ~ "01/06" {cmd="qdel " $1; system(cmd); close(cmd)}' Bash #!/bin/bash match="01/06" while read job; do set -- $job if [[ $6 =~ $match ]]; then qdel "$1" fi done < <(qstat) If you want to do a dry-run, then change qdel "$1" to echo qdel "$1" to see what it would have done.


5

No, PBS won't automatically distribute the jobs among nodes for you. But this is a common thing to want to do, and you have a few options. Easiest and in some ways most advantagous for you is to bunch the tasks into 1-node sized chunks, and submit those bundles as individual jobs. This will get your jobs started faster; a 1-node job will normally get ...


5

It depends a bit on what job scheduler you are using and what version, but there's another approach that can be taken too if your results-processing can also be done on the same queue as the job. One very handy way of managing lots of related job in more recent versions of torque (and with grid engine, and others) is to launch the any individual jobs as a ...


5

The qsub utility can read the script from the standard input, so by using a here document you can create scripts on the fly, dynamically: #!/bin/sh for i in `seq 1 10` do cat <<EOS | qsub - #!/bin/sh #PBS -V #PBS -S /bin/sh #PBS -N pass_test #PBS -l nodes=1:ppn=1,walltime=00:02:00 #PBS -M XXXXXX@XXX.edu cd /scratch/XXXXXX/pass_test ./run_test ...


5

This is possible in TORQUE. If you have a shared filesystem you can set $spool_as_final_name true in the mom's config file. This will have the file write directly to the final output destination instead of spooling in the spool directory. Once you are set up with that you can tail -f the output file and monitor anything you want. ...


5

You can do it like this: #PBS -l nodes=<node_name> You can also specify the number of processors: #PBS -l nodes=<node_name>:ppn=X Or you can request additional nodes, specified or unspecified: #PBS -l nodes=<node_name1>[:ppn=X][+<node_name2...] That gives you multiple specific nodes. #PBS -l ...


4

Something you might consider is having each job script just touch a filename in a dedicated folder like $i.jobdone, and in your master script, you could simply use ls *.jobdone | wc -l to test for the right number of jobs done.


4

How about simply "pbsnodes" - that should probably tell you more than you care to know. Or I suppose "qstat -Q".


4

Filling in following the solution suggested by Jonathan in the comments. There are several resource managers based on the original Portable Batch System: OpenPBS, TORQUE and PBS Professional. The systems had diverged significantly and use different command syntax for newer features such as job arrays. Job arrays are a convenient way to submit multiple ...


4

Do a 'qstat -f [job number]' and look for 'submit_args'.


3

Once you move beyond working with one machine, you move license types from a parallel computing toolbox to a Distributed Computing Server license. The licenses are available in clusters from 8 workers and up. List price on a 8 worker cluster is $6K, 32 workers are $21K. You can get more information on the Mathworks product page. Also note that submitting ...


3

I don't think that's what's happening. Can you try running this: cnt=0 for a in 1 2; do for b in 1 2; do echo --- $cnt ssh somehost "echo result: '$cnt'" & let cnt++ done done Replace somehost with some host where you have sshd running. This prints numbers 0 - 3 getting back from echo result: '$cnt' getting executed remotely. Thus, ...


3

You can do this easily using jug (which I developed for a similar setup). You'd write in file (e.g., model.py): @TaskGenerator def model(param1, param2): res = complex_computation(param1, param2) pyplot.coolgraph(res) for param1 in np.linspace(0, 1.,100): for param2 in xrange(2000): model(param1, param2) And that's it! Now you ...


3

Steven: The above should work; it looks like something along the line (PBS <-> MPI library <-> mpiexec) is misconfigured. The first, most obvious guess -- is the mpiexec the same mpi launching program that corresponds to the library you compiled with? If you do a which mpiexec in your script, do you get something that corresponds to the which mpicc ...


3

pbs_python[1] could work for this. If experiment_model.py 'a' as an argument you could do import pbs, os server_name = pbs.pbs_default() c = pbs.pbs_connect(server_name) attopl = pbs.new_attropl(4) attropl[0].name = pbs.ATTR_l attropl[0].resource = 'ncpus' attropl[0].value = '1' attropl[1].name = pbs.ATTR_l attropl[1].resource = 'mem' attropl[1].value ...


3

couple things: you need to tell mpi where to launch processes, assuming you are using mpich, look at mpiexec help section and find machine file or equivalent description. Unless machine file is provided, it will run on one host PBS automatically creates nodes file. Its name is stored in PBS_NODEFILE environment variable available in PBS command file. Try ...


3

On some systems, your environment isn't always propagated via mpirun. You should set all those variables in your .bashrc file.


3

Yes, of course; generally such systems will have instructions for how to do this, like these. If you have (say) 4x 4-cpu jobs that you know will each take the same amount of time, and (say) you want them to run in 4 different directories (so the output files are easier to keep track of), use the shell ampersand to run them each in the background and then ...


3

As far as I know, there is no way to set the max latency in the admin console, based on routes. However, what you could do, is once you receive your email, give the text of the email to a taskqueue task. These can be rate-limited to a very granular detail. If you're using python, you can use the deferred module, so you don't have to create separate handlers ...


3

I was able to answer my own question with the following solution using the $PBS_NODEFILE environment variable which contains the path to a file listing information about the available nodes: jobscript.pbs: #!/bin/bash #PBS -N test_run #PBS -l nodes=32 #PBS -l walltime=06:00:00 #PBS -j oe #PBS -q normal #PBS -o output.txt # This finds out the number of ...


3

Aliases are intended for interactive use, and by default alias expansion does not occur in non-interactive shells. You could add shopt -s expand_aliases to the beginning of any script where you want to use any defined aliases. However, I wouldn't recommend this. Since an alias could expand to anything, it's safer to limit command definitions to in-script ...


3

The module generates a script then tries to execute it without having made it executable. Workaround: use PBS::Client qw( ); BEGIN { my $orig_genScript = \&PBS::Client::genScript; my $new_genScript = sub { my $script_qfn = $orig_genScript->(@_); chmod(0700, $script_qfn) or die $!; return $script_qfn; }; no warnings ...


3

qsub has a very predictable output. Many automated submission systems (such as Grid interfaces) simply parse the output from qsub, looking for the jobid. An example of parsing is available from the BLAHP project (European grid middleware). jobID=`${pbs_binpath}/qsub $bls_tmp_file` # actual submission ... # The job id is actually the first numbers in the ...



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