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9

Principal Components do not necessarily have any correlation to classification accuracy. There could be a 2-variable situation where 99% of the variance corresponds to the first PC but that PC has no relation to the underlying classes in the data. Whereas the second PC (which only contributes to 1% of the variance) is the one that can separate the classes. ...


6

The explained tells you how accurately you could represent the data by just using that principal component. In your case it means that just using the main principal component, you can describe very accurately (to a 99%) the data. Lets make a 2D example. Imagine you have data that is 100x2 and you do PCA. the result could be something like this (taken from ...


5

I think you should try theme(legend.position="none"). library(factoextra) plot(fviz_pca_biplot(pca, label="var", habillage=as.factor(kc$cluster)) + ggtitle("") + theme(text = element_text(size = 15), panel.background = element_blank(), panel.grid.major = element_blank(), panel.grid.minor = element_blank(), axis.line = ...


3

You could use bootstrapping on this. Simply re-sample your data with the bootstrapping package and record the principal components computed every time. Use the resulting empirical distribution to get your confidence intervals. The boot package makes this pretty easy. Here is an example calculating the Confidence Interval at 95% for the first PCA component ...


2

After you trained your LDA model with some data X, you may want to project some other data, Z. in this case what you should do is: lda = LDA(n_components=2) #creating a LDA object lda = lda.fit(X, y) #learning the projection matrix X_lda = lda.transform(X) #using the model to project X # .... getting Z as test data.... Z = lda.transform(Z) #using the model ...


2

I am not using Python, but I did something you need in C++ & opencv. Hope you succeed in converting it to whatever language. // choose how many eigenvectors you want: int nEigensOfInterest = 0; float sum = 0.0; for (int i = 0; i < mEiVal.rows; ++i) { sum += mEiVal.at<float>(i, 0); if (((sum * 100) / (sumOfEigens)) > 80) { ...


2

I think that task is not for PCA. I would first try to introduce some kind of distance measure between 2 addresses. You can either use entire address as a single feature - then there're plenty of general-purpose string similarity measures, for example Levenshtein distance. There's a method in utils package. Or introduce more features, like number of ...


2

Your code looks fine, so what is wrong? DataDataData, it's so crucial when performing computer vision tasks like this. To give yourself an advantage use a readily avaliable dataset with corresponding test data - This would work Also, as berak says normalising the images will help. In Turk & Pentland (Which if you haven't read you should) they state: ...


2

Indeed, you should transpose your input to have rows as data points and columns as features: [coeff, score, latent, ~, explained] = pca(M'); The principal components are given by the columns of coeff in order of descending variance, so the first column holds the most important component. The variances for each component are given in latent, and the ...


2

Yes, according to the pca help, "Rows of X correspond to observations and columns to variables." score just tells you the representation of M in the principal component space. You want the first column of coeff. numberOfDimensions = 5; coeff = pca(A); reducedDimension = coeff(:,1:numberOfDimensions); reducedData = A * reducedDimension;


1

I don't know OpenCV and its types. But your typedef looks suspicious. My guess is that the error occurs while creating the imgXv instances of Row. For each call of Row imgXv(36000,img1); a vector is created that consists of 36000 instances of Mat that are all copies of the imgX instances. See constructor 2) of std::vector::vector in cppreference.com: ...


1

Orientations are represented by Quaternions in ROS, not by directional vectors. Quaternions can be a bit unintuitive, but fortunately there are some helper functions in the tf package, to generate quaternions, for example, from roll/pitch/yaw-angles. One way to fix the marker would therefore be, to convert the direction vector into a quaternion. In your ...


1

As far as I can tell, you have mixed and shuffled aa number of approaches. No wonder it doesn't work... you could simply use jaccard distance (a simple inversion of jaccard similarity) + hierachical clustering you could do MDS to project you data, then k-means (probably what you are trying to do) affinity propagation etc. are worth a try


1

loadings(pca1) returns the PCA Loadings. unclass drops the class and converts it into a matrix. pca1$sdev^2 > 1 returns TRUE for columns where the eigenvalue > 1. [...,drop = F] selects the columns where the index is equals to TRUE while keeping the matrix structure even when only one column is selected. write.csv writes the results to a file. Final ...


1

This should also work: add + guides(shape=FALSE, color=FALSE) after ggtitle("") library(factoextra) fviz_pca_biplot(pca, label="var", habillage=as.factor(kc$cluster)) + labs(color=NULL) + ggtitle("") + guides(shape=FALSE, color=FALSE) theme(text = element_text(size = 15), panel.background = element_blank(), panel.grid.major = ...


1

As Matlab documentation says, "Rows of X correspond to observations and columns correspond to variables". So you are feeding in a matrix with only 4999 observations for 37152 observations. Geometrically, you have 4999 points in a 37152-dimensional space. These points are contained in a 4998-dimensional affine subspace, so Matlab gets you 4998 directions ...


1

The problem is: The answer to your previous question is still correct. Whether you fix the scale of the latent variable in advance or rescale the standardized variable is irrelevant, because the resulting scores will be the same. Here is an illustration using lavaan, including both options. Fixing the factor loadings and intercepts isn't supported in ...


1

The snippet you found does not work because there is no declared "survey.prcomp" object. "top4" is missing as well. I assume the authors missed this line: survey.prcomp <- prcomp(top2, scale=TRUE) And also this one: top4 <- list() Then, if your aim is to get first 15 rotation vectors, you can do so with survey.prcomp$rotation[,1:15] The snippet ...



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