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So I had to install ggbiplot via devtools and manually update package::digest before I could get your example code to reproduce, but var.axes will do the trick: g <- ggbiplot(ir.pca, obs.scale = 1, var.scale = 1, groups = ir.species, ellipse = TRUE, circle = FALSE, varname.size=0, var.axes = F) g <- g + scale_color_discrete(name = '') g <- g + ...


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You can visualize the other dimensions by changing the axes(1,2) argument to e.g. axes(3,4): fviz_pca_ind(X, axes = c(3, 4), geom = c("point", "text"), label = "all", invisible = "none", labelsize = 4) # (...) Side note: The first couple of principal components often contain almost all variation in the dataset. The last principal components are ...


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(Note: this answer is adapted from my answer on Cross Validated here: Why are there only n−1 principal components for n data points if the number of dimensions is larger or equal than n?) PCA (as most typically run) creates a new coordinate system by: shifting the origin to the centroid of your data, squeezes and/or stretches the axes to make them equal ...


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Yes, this is doable for every country. You can make your custom function which takes appropriate parameters, e.g. country name and data. You do the magic inside and return an appropriate object (or not). Pass this magic to a processed data which you import and make pretty only once. The below code is not tested but should get you started. A few comments. ...


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The easiest answer to your question is to input an identity matrix to your model. identity_input = [(Vectors.dense([1.0, .0, 0.0, .0, 0.0]),),(Vectors.dense([.0, 1.0, .0, .0, .0]),), \ (Vectors.dense([.0, 0.0, 1.0, .0, .0]),),(Vectors.dense([.0, 0.0, .0, 1.0, .0]),), (Vectors.dense([.0, 0.0, .0, .0, 1.0]),)] df_identity = ...



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