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Regarding to your last comment/question: gmm_classifier.fit(pca) # in this way it works, but I'm not sure if it actually model is trained correctly Whenever you call this, the classifier forgets the previous information and be only trained by the last data. Try appending the feats inside the loop and then fit.


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The easiest answer to your question is to input an identity matrix to your model. identity_input = [(Vectors.dense([1.0, .0, 0.0, .0, 0.0]),),(Vectors.dense([.0, 1.0, .0, .0, .0]),), \ (Vectors.dense([.0, 0.0, 1.0, .0, .0]),),(Vectors.dense([.0, 0.0, .0, 1.0, .0]),), (Vectors.dense([.0, 0.0, .0, .0, 1.0]),)] df_identity = ...


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You can just use the inbuilt parameter pca = PCA(whiten=True) pca.fit(X) check the documentation.


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Use mode() mode(arrests_pca$loadings)


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Use str(arrests_pca$loadings). It returns loadings [1:4, 1:4] -0.536 -0.583 -0.278 -0.543 0.418 ... - attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2 ..$ : chr [1:4] "Murder" "Assault" "UrbanPop" "Rape" ..$ : chr [1:4] "Comp.1" "Comp.2" "Comp.3" "Comp.4" You can see on the first line that it's a 4x4 matrix.


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Here's a simple starting point for a solution that you can tweak to get the results in your desired format. Let's assume you're working with the iris dataset in R, and you want to do pca for each Species, kind of like how you want to do pca by each country in your data. library(caret) data(iris) Iris <- split(iris, iris$Species) for(i in 1:length(Iris)){...


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Sorry, I don't have the rep to comment, so posting as an answer, but after running your code, in particular this line: log10(training1[, -13]+1) returns NaN values in some columns (IL_1alpha and IL_3 actually): Warning messages: 1: In lapply(X = x, FUN = .Generic, ...) : NaNs produced So that seems to be the source of the error. Maybe you ...


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I think you are asking the wrong question. The eigenvectors ARE the the principal components (PC1, PC2, etc.). So plotting the eigenvectors in the [PC1, PC2, PC3] 3D plot is simply plotting the three orthogonal axes of that plot. You probably want to visualize how the eigenvectors look in your original coordinate system. This is what is discussed in your ...


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Anyway, I got annoyed after a while and did the following. I created a pca object at the beginning of a for loop using a pointer, and then deleted it at the end of the loop with delete. It is some allocing and deallocing going on there which is most likely not optimal, but it did the trick. The PCA object itself was only 144 bytes large, cause it mostly uses ...


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PCA is used on the raw data, not on distances, i.e. PCA(X). MDS uses a distance function, i.e. MDS(X, cosine). You appear to believe you need to run PCA(cosine(X))? That doesn't work. You want to run MDS(X, cosine).


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As you stated above matrix M can decomposed as product ot 3 matrices: U * S * V*. Geometrical sense is next: any transformation could be deemed as a sequence of rotation (V * ), scaling (S) and rotation again(U). Here's good description and animation. What's important for us? Matrix S is diagonal - all its values lying off the main diagonal are 0. Like: ...


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Following up on @RichardTelford's comment, you can get the code for ggbiplot by typing ggbiplot in your console. Then copy and paste this into a script file and assign it to a new name, say, my_ggbiplot. Then change the last if statement in the function from this: if (var.axes) { g <- g + geom_text(data = df.v, aes(label = ...


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You seem to be confusing things. Kernel matrix is a matrix of pairwise dot products, these are not features. If you have your feature matrix F, which is sparse and of size N x H, then your kernel matrix (using linear kernel on top of this space) is simply: K = F F' which is N x N, and dense, thus there is no problem with applying any kind of SVM.


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It seems that there is a general issue with this. So I found this solution: Instead of iterating with pointers, use a regular iterator, and then use these formulation. PointIndicesPtr pi_ptr(new PointIndices); pi_ptr->indices = cluster_indices[i].indices; //now can use pi_ptr as input


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I think you can examine the explained_variance_ratio_ attribute after fitting the PCA object to see how much variance are captured by each PC.


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I would make a vector of the characters I want and then subset this by zone zone_pch <- c(16, 10, 3, 8, 2) plot(dune_pca, type = "n", scaling = 3) points(dune_pca, display = "sites", scaling = 3, pch = zone_pch[zone])


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Your grouping variable needs to be a factor not numeric library(ggbiplot) GPA2 <- data.frame( ir.group = sample(c(1,2,3),10, replace = TRUE), x = sample(1:10), y = sample(1:10), z = sample(1:10) ) data(GPA2) head(GPA2, 3) log.ir <- log(GPA2[, 2:4]) ir.group <- GPA2[, 1] ir.pca <- prcomp(log.ir,center = TRUE,scale = TRUE) print(ir.pca) ...


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This is actually due to the built-in setting of PCA in sklearn: n_components : int, None or string Number of components to keep. if n_components is not set all components are kept: n_components == min(n_samples, n_features) Therefore, when our dataset has fewer samples than its features, PCA automatically chooses the number of samples as the ...


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I agree it's a pity not to have it in some mainstream package such as sklearn. Here is a home-made implementation: https://github.com/mazieres/analysis/blob/master/analysis.py#L19-34


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I am assuming here that by EigenVectors you mean the Eigenvectors of the Covariance Matrix. Lets say that you have n data points in a p-dimensional space, and X is a p x n matrix of your points then the directions of the principal components are the Eigenvectors of the Covariance matrix XXT. You can obtain the directions of these EigenVectors from sklearn ...


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The results are different because you're subtracting the mean of each row of the data matrix. Based on the way you're computing things, rows of the data matrix correspond to data points and columns correspond to dimensions (this is how the pca() function works too). With this setup, you should subtract the mean from each column, not row. This corresponds to '...


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Your mistake is that you're extracting the last row of the eigenvector array. But the eigenvectors form the columns of the eigenvector array returned by np.linalg.eig, not the rows. From the documentation: [...] the arrays a, w, and v satisfy the equations dot(a[:,:], v[:,i]) = w[i] * v[:,i] [for each i] where a is the array that np.linalg.eig was ...


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Nevermind, found it: predict(p, newdata = as.data.frame(t(vdata)) )


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I am using numpy 1.11.0. If the matrix has more than 1 eigvalues equal to 0, then 'SVD did not converge' is raised.


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Yes, PCA is just a preprocessing technique, which rotates/scales your coordinate system (and can drop some dimensions). Consequently this is not clustering nor classification tool. In order to use it with any other technique simply use it one after another - PCA is simply a data preparation step, thus transform your data before applying any clustering/...



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