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11

This is the corresponding code in the kernel: static int show_device(struct seq_file *m, void *v) { const struct pci_dev *dev = v; const struct pci_driver *drv; int i; if (dev == NULL) return 0; drv = pci_dev_driver(dev); seq_printf(m, "%02x%02x\t%04x%04x\t%x", dev->bus->number, dev->devfn, ...


6

The definitive resource for /sys is Documentation/sysfs-rules.txt. The definitive resource for /proc/sys is Documentation/sysctl/. The definitive resource for the rest of /proc appears to be Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt. The rest of the Documentation/ directory in the Linux kernel source has other interesting information. In particular, ...


4

I'd look into Xen, it appears that you can load a backend xen driver on the host OS which will then allow you to communicate directly with the hardware from the guest. See this link for more information. I'm not a Xen user, but from my virtualization experience I would guess that the paravirtualization aspects of a Xen host/guess is going to be your best ...


4

Memory-mapped I/O Trace is now in the mainline kernel, see /usr/src/linux/Documentation/trace/mmiotrace.txt for documentation.


4

Not sure if you are asking about PCI or PCIe. You used both terms, and the answer is different for each. If you are talking about a legacy PCI bus: The answer is "yes". Board to board DMA is doable. Video capture boards may DMA video frames directly into your graphics card memory for example. In your example, the video card could DMA directly to a ...


3

The "PnP OS" option is only relevant for ISA PnP devices, which are pretty much non-existent these days. That's why you don't see the option much anymore. It's basically a don't care on motherboards without ISA slots. Might still have some relevance if you can set your serial port base addresses to "Auto". The BIOS should always configure the PCI BARs ...


3

This should work for you: #!/usr/bin/awk -f BEGIN { IGNORECASE = 1 cmd = "sudo lspci -vvv" while ((cmd | getline) > 0) { if ($0 ~ /nVidia/) {inner = 1; pci = $1} if ($0 ~ /(corr|fatal)err\-/) {if (inner) print pci, $1, $2, $3, $4, $5, $6, $7} if ($0 == "") {inner = 0} } close(cmd) }


3

I think you may find lspci or lspci -vv will help you. (You may need to be root.) That is, if the PCI id is set in the card, and not determined from the eeprom, you should be able to use lspci to get the card's PCI id and determine which card you're working with. The -n option will give you the raw numbers, which will probably be more helpful if you're ...


3

You are trying to open a relative path (which does not exist): sys/bus/pci/devices/%04x:%02x:%02x.%d/resource0 instead of an absolute one: /sys/bus/pci/devices/%04x:%02x:%02x.%d/resource0


2

According to this Microsoft article, for Win2K and newer, you can find details of parallel-connected devices in the registry at HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\LPTENUM.


2

After reading the PCI specification, I simply need to call the PCI BIOS functions through a given interrupt vector (1Ah). However, this is complicated by the PCI configuration which must happen before hand. The PCI configuration space appears to not use an explicit address for access, but BIOS function calls. EDIT: Actually, turns out the BIOS does a lot ...


2

That's a perfectly acceptable mmap call and should work correctly.


2

I would change your awk script into a shell script: #!/bin/sh sudo lspci -vvv | /usr/bin/awk ' BEGIN {IGNORECASE=1} /nVidia/ {inner=1;pci=$1} /(corr|fatal)err\-/ {if (inner) print pci, $1, $2, $3, $4, $5, $6, $7} $0=="" {inner=0} '


2

On legacy PCI (assuming no PCI-to-PCI bridges in between), it is possible to "listen" to bus transactions intended for other devices. We have some in-house developed debug hardware that does exactly this. You need to make sure that your listening devices does not "claim" the transaction itself, though. Most off-the-shelf PCI IP cores and ASICs will not be ...


2

This is non standard feature of AMD CPUs and chipsets. AFAIK it won't work on Intel platform. At least from Linux kernel code I can understand that it is possible to access extended configuration space using CF8/CFC IO addresses. patch from AMD Regarding ((reg & 0xF00) << 16) -- looks like reserved bits 30:24 of configuration address port at CF8 ...


2

I can answer at least part of your question. C1 C2 C3 .... Chipset/PCI bridge | | | | +---+----+ .... -----+ C1, C2, C3 etc are the white PCI connectors. This is where you plug in a PCI card. These are often called PCI slots The line at the bottom is the PCI bus. All devices on the same PCI bus can directly communicate with ...


2

A NoClassDefFoundError indicates that you're missing a JAR file from your classpath, specifically the one that is holding SerialPortEventListener class. Check your classpath.


2

For MSI, you need to enable the MSI interrupt on your device first with pci_enable_msi. The MSI interrupt is not the same as the "standard PCI" interrupt. After calling pci_enable_msi, the interrupt number should be gotten from pci_dev->irq for calling request_irq. Look for an example in the kernel source tree. More info in Documentation/PCI/MSI-HOWTO.txt


1

A closer look at your lscpi output before and after hot plugging the device shows more delta than just the sub device/vendor ID. I'd be surprised if the device functions as expected after hot plugging. Besides, forcing PCI reenumeration is not possible primarily because there may be other devices that have been enumerated correctly and functioning already. ...


1

After many hours I came up with a 'reasonably' reliable approach. This logic fundamentally assumes that the slotted PCI device bus ID is unique and separate from all other (onboard) PCI bus IDs. So far my tests have shown this to be the case; regardless this is still an assumption. My code is rather long and I'm sure it could be improved so instead I'll ...


1

afaik you cannot send data to the pci parallel port via base address if there is a built in parallel port configured in bios, one way to send to that pci parallel is by disabling the parallel port in the bios... I already tested this scenario and it works fine in my side. but if you want to use many ports, like the built in and the pci parallel ports, for ...


1

The memory based list of parallel ports (including serial ports) is limited to only three entries (originally was 4 in IBM PC). It's designed for old ISA based systems when Plug an Play (PnP) technology doesn't exist yet. On newer systems, the BIOS PnP functions should be used to detect any PCI based parallel port devices. This involves scanning through all ...


1

Assuming that both the NIC card and the HDD are End Points (or Legacy Endpoints) you cannot funnel traffic without involving the Root Complex (CPU). PCIe, unlike PCI or PCI-X, is not a bus but a link, thus any transaction from an Endpoint device (say the NIC) would have to travel through the Root Complex (CPU) in order to get to another branch (HDD).


1

That depends. On PCI, I think all are connected in a shared bus. So probably yes. But on PCI-Express each device has its own "bus" - so they are not physically connected (directly).


1

Yes, Xen can do this successfully. It is called PCI Passthrough: http://wiki.xen.org/wiki/Xen_PCI_Passthrough I've done this successfully for both Windows and Linux guests with Xen 4.x, using my system's IOMMU. There are some restrictions on which devices can be assigned to which guests based on the PCI hierarchy in your particular system. You can view ...


1

If you want to go the way of reading/writing I/O ports, you need to be able to write them. The .net framework (the microsoft one on windows atleast) does not support this directly. For reading/writing to parallel ports i'm having great success with the InOut32 library (link). This means you will have to use PInvoke to make it work. For me this code works: ...


1

PCI/PCIE device scanning, It is possible to have redundant addresses in the capabilities pointer(corrupted PCI config space). Please check if there is any redundancy in capability pointer values in all B:D:F combinations, If you found any issues you can directly contact your BIOS vendor to get it rectified.


1

As it turns out, PCI location information is available under HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\<PnP ID>\LocationInformation Where for PCI Devices is something like PCI\\ Under Windows XP this will tell you the Bus Number, Device Number and Function Number. This is likely the same information from http://support.microsoft.com/kb/253232 as ...


1

I think this KB article is what you need. This article describes how you can get the configuration and location information (such as BusNumber, DeviceNumber, and Function Number) of a Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) device in a driver that is part of the target device's driver stack either as a function or filter driver.


1

Do you get errors pushing your massive amounts of data, or are you "simply" concerned with slow speed? I doubt there's any easy way to monitor PCI-e bandwidth usage, if it's possible at all. But it should be possible to query the bus type the video adapter is connected to via WMI and/or SetupAPI - I have no personal experience or helpful links for either, ...



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