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25

No, but in C# you can repeatedly ask for the current element without moving to the next one. It's just a different way of looking at it. It wouldn't be too hard to write a C# class to take a .NET-style IEnumerator and return a Java-style Iterator. Personally I find the .NET style easier to use in most cases, but there we go :) EDIT: Okay, this is ...


23

fgetc+ungetc. Maybe something like this: int fpeek(FILE *stream) { int c; c = fgetc(stream); ungetc(c, stream); return c; }


19

Yes, you can make this assumption, because it is stated in the documentation: Heaps are arrays for which heap[k] <= heap[2*k+1] and heap[k] <= heap[2*k+2] for all k, counting elements from zero. For the sake of comparison, non-existing elements are considered to be infinite. The interesting property of a heap is that heap[0] is always ...


18

You can use a PushbackReader. Using that you can read a character, then unread it. This essentially allows you to push it back. PushbackReader pr = new PushbackReader(reader); char c = (char)pr.read(); // do something to look at c pr.unread((int)c); //pushes the character back into the buffer


14

func (b *Reader) Read(p []byte) (n int, err error) http://golang.org/pkg/bufio/#Reader.Read The number of bytes read will be limited to len(p)


12

No, unfortunately there isn't. The IEnumerator<T> interface only exposes the following members: Methods: Dispose MoveNext Reset Properties: Current


12

The documentation indicates that the position of the StreamReader is not changed, but you are checking the underlying stream's current position, not that of the reader itself. I don't see that it guarantees that the position of the underlying stream remains the same. In fact, I suspect that it simply reads it and buffers internally to keep the reader's ...


11

You're looking for is ioctl(fd,FIONREAD,&bytes_available) , and under windows ioctlsocket(socket,FIONREAD,&bytes_available). Be warned though, the OS doesn't necessarily guarantee how much data it will buffer for you, so if you are waiting for very much data you are going to be better off reading in data as it comes in and storing it in your own ...


11

Note that the bufio.Read method calls the underlying io.Read at most once, meaning that it can return n < len(p), without reaching EOF. If you want to read exactly len(p) bytes or fail with an error, you can use io.ReadFull like this: n, err := io.ReadFull(reader, p) This works even if the reader is buffered.


10

You could use a LinkedBlockingDeque and physically remove the item from the queue (using takeLast()) but replace it again at the end of the queue if processing fails using putLast(E e). Meanwhile your "producers" would add elements to the front of the queue using putFirst(E e). You could always encapsulate this behaviour within your own Queue ...


9

Yes, use the select module's poll: import select q = select.poll() q.register(stdout,select.POLLIN) and in the while use: l = q.poll(0) if not l: pass # no input else: pass # there is some input


9

Peek is a verb, so in my book Peek() should be a method. However with a different name it could also be a property. Remember that any property has associated get and/or set methods, so you'd end up with a method either way.


8

You can do this with a combination of getline, tellg and seekg. #include <fstream> #include <iostream> #include <ios> int main () { std::fstream fs(__FILE__); std::string line; // Get current position int len = fs.tellg(); // Read line getline(fs, line); // Print first line in file std::cout << ...


7

You could use a getc followed by an ungetc


7

You can try the "boolean ready()" method. From the Java 6 API doc: "A buffered character stream is ready if the buffer is not empty, or if the underlying character stream is ready." BufferedReader r = new BufferedReader(reader); if(r.ready()) { r.read(); }


7

I ran into the same 'peek for magic number and then decide which stream processor to send the stream to' requirement and unfortunately can't weasel my way out of that problem - as suggested in comments to Aaronaught's answer - by passing the already consumed bytes into the stream processing methods in separate parameters, as those methods are a given and ...


7

Try handling the iteration yourself: my $line = <$fileHandler>; while(1) { # keep looping until I say so my $nextLine = <$fileHandler>; if ($line =~ m/>/ || !defined $nextLine) { ### Do the stuff } ### Do any other stuff; last unless defined $nextLine; $line = $nextLine; } I added the extra check in the if ...


7

Portably, you can get the next character in the input stream with getchar() and then push it back with ungetc(), which results in a state as if the character wasn't removed from the stream. The ungetc function pushes the character specified by c (converted to an unsigned char) back onto the input stream pointed to by stream. Pushed-back characters will ...


7

From the Python docs: peek([size]) Return bytes from the stream without advancing the position. At most one single read on the raw stream is done to satisfy the call. The number of bytes returned may be less or more than requested. Emphasis mine. Since the file pointer isn't moved in peek, it doesn't really matter if peek reads more than the ...


7

The program has undefined behaviour as it is returning the address of a local variable from a function: StackP newStack(void) { struct Stack stack1; StackP stackPtr = &stack1; return stackPtr; } stack1 no longer exists when newStack exits. stackPtr must point to dynamically allocated memory if it is to exist beyond the scope of the function: ...


7

No, this is no bug and has nothing to do with Stack and all to do with the Integer class. Understand that Integer is a reference type and so two Integers can be .equal(...) and not ==. Understand that when used on reference types == checks if the two object references are the same which is not what you're interested in. The equals(...) method on the other ...


6

Given that the maximum size of a UDP packet is 65507, you could just allocate a single 64k 'bounce buffer' for all your recvfrom() calls -- once you've copied it in, read the size, allocate a new buffer, and make a copy of your packet at exactly the right size. It is a little wasteful to be copying packet data around so much, but it would let you allocate ...


6

There are two issues with your use of std::istream::peek(): This function access the next character and does not skip leading whitespace. You probably want to skip leading whitespace before determining what the next character is, e.g., using the manipulator std::ws: (std::cin >> std::ws).peek(). The result from std::istream::peek() is not a char. ...


6

You're very close to a solution - the only thing you got wrong was reading from the Conn itself first. You are right that bufio.Reader's Peek method is the way to go. The trick is to make the buffered reader first and call Peek on the buffered reader rather than reading from the original Conn. Here's a bufferedConn type that will do what you need: type ...


5

The following code will look at the first byte in the Stream. Should act as a peek for you. BufferedReader bReader = new BufferedReader(inputStream); bReader.mark(1); int byte1 = bReader.read(); bReader.reset();


5

If you don't need to actually retrieve the byte, you can refer to the DataAvailable property. Otherwise, you can wrap it with a StreamReader and invoke its Peek method. Note that neither of these are particularly reliable for reading from a network stream, due to latency issues. The data might become available (present in the read buffer) the very instant ...


5

Tested this out myself. Position of the underlying FileStream has changed, but the key point is, that doesn't mean that the StreamReader has actually CONSUMED any bytes. So there is no problem.


5

PEEK(PEEK 16398+256*PEEK 16399) is an idiom meaning “get the character number at the current PRINT position”. This works because the two-byte word at 16398 is used by the ZX81 BASIC/ROM to store a pointer to the memory location in the screen data block corresponding to the PRINT position. So to do collision detection, you'd first have to set: PRINT AT X,Y; ...


5

I'm not sure why Peek Method returns -1 in your case, but the usual way to read lines with the StreamReader Class to the end of the file is to repeatedly call the ReadLine Method until null is returned: string line; while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null) { Console.WriteLine(line); }



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