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24

A CFG grammar is non-deterministic, meaning that some input could result in two or more possible parse-trees. Though most CFG-based parser-generators have restrictions on the determinability of the grammar. It will give a warning or error if it has two or more choices. A PEG grammar is deterministic, meaning that any input can only be parsed one way. To ...


21

Pure PEG cannot parse indentation. But peg.js can. I did a quick-and-dirty experiment (being inspired by Ira Baxter's comment about cheating). /* Initializations */ { function start(first, tail) { var done = [first[1]]; for (var i = 0; i < tail.length; i++) { done = done.concat(tail[i][1][0]) done.push(tail[i][1][1]); } ...


19

You have to break up the grammar more, using more "non-terminals" (not sure if that's what you call them in a PEG): start = article animal stmt_list article = article:'a'? __ { return article; } animal = animal:('cat'/'dog') _ { return animal; } stmt_list = '(' _ exp:[a-zA-Z]+ _ ')' { return [ exp.join('') ]; } // optional whitespace _ = [ ...


16

I think the big "problem" with PEGs is that they don't fit into the normal taxonomy of grammars as they operate in a fundamentally different way. Normal grammars are "backwards" in the sense that they describe all the possible sentences (programs) that can be generated. PEGs describe how to parse--they come at the problem from the other end. In my view this ...


16

Parser: // do not use result cache, nor line and column tracking { var indentStack = [], indent = ""; } start = INDENT? l:line { return l; } line = SAMEDENT line:(!EOL c:. { return c; })+ EOL? children:( INDENT c:line* DEDENT { return c; })? { var o = {}; o[line] = children; return children ? o : line.join(""); } EOL = "\r\n" / "\n" / ...


15

I received a reply in the PEG.js Google Group that helped me onto the right track. I'm posting answers to all three problems in the hope that they can serve as a rudimentary tutorial for other PEG beginners like myself. Notice that no recursion is needed. Example 1: This is straightforward once you understand basic PEG idioms. start = Text+ Text = ...


11

It is fairly easy to build Javascipt editor with code completion from PEG grammar. I would describe how to do it with PEG.js. You need to extend your grammar with some lax parsing rules that allow to provide suggestions when previous statements are broken. These lax rules need to be handled conditionally or you will need two separate grammars - one for ...


10

The match is getting the entire string, but the captures are wrong. Note that '->' has a higher precedence than concatenation, so you probably need parentheses around things like this: EXPR <- S? ( TERM ( (S OPERATOR)? S TERM )+ ) -> {}


9

Right-associative operators are relatively trivial to write, since they can be parsed "natively" recursive: E2 = l:Value op:("*" / "/") r:E2 { return {left:l, operator:op, right:r}; } / Value // or equivalently: E2 = l:Value r:(("*" / "/") E2)? { if (!r) return l; return {left:l, operator:r[0], right:r[1]} } We can translate the ...


8

Because there is no separate tokenization phase, there is no "time" to discard certain characters (or tokens). Since you're familiar with ANTLR, think of it like this: let's say ANTLR handles only PEG. So you only have parser rules, no lexer rules. Now how would you discard, say, spaces? (you can't). So, the answer to you question is: you can't, you'll ...


8

I think an indentation-sensitive language like that is context-sensitive. I believe PEG can only do context-free langauges. Note that, while nalply's answer is certainly correct that PEG.js can do it via external state (ie the dreaded global variables), it can be a dangerous path to walk down (worse than the usual problems with global variables). Some rules ...


8

Use negative lookahead predicates: phrase =(!"START" .)* "START" result:(!"END" .)* "END" .* { for (var i=0;i<result.length;++i) // remove empty element added by predicate matching {result[i]=result[i][1]; } return result.join(""); } You need to use a negative predicate for END as well as START because repetition in pegjs ...


7

So what we are really doing here with indentation is creating something like a C-style blocks which often have their own lexical scope. If I were writing a compiler for a language like that I think I would try and have the lexer keep track of the indentation. Every time the indentation increases it could insert a '{' token. Likewise every time it decreases ...


7

Unless you want to fight the battle of getting a full-context free (or worse, a full context-sensitive) grammar completely correct for every language you want to process (or worse, for every dialect of the language you want to process... how many kinds of C++ are there?), for the purposes of syntax highlighting you're probably better giving up on complete ...


7

I would suggest Boost Spirit or Antlr if the grammar is complex; Xpressive if it's a little simpler, Tokenizer and handmade code if it's trivial. Good luck


7

You have (at least) 2 problems: Your TextCharacter should not match any character (the .). It should match any character except a backslash and semi-colon, or it should match an escaped character: TextCharacter = [^\\;] / "\\" . The second problem is that your grammar mandates your input to end with a semi-colon (but your input does not end with a ;). ...


7

I've done very advanced Rebol parsers which manage live and mission-critical TCP servers, and doing proper error reporting was a requirement. So this is important! Probably one of the most unique aspects of Rebol's PARSE is that you can include direct evaluation within the rules. So you can set variables to track the parse position, or the error messages, ...


6

Found a good answer about Packrat vs LALR parsing. Some quotes from it: L(AL)R parsers are linear time parsers, too. So in theory, neither packrat nor L(AL)R parsers are "faster". What matters, in practice, of course, is implementation. L(AL)R state transitions can be executed in very few machine instructions ("look token code up in vector, get next ...


6

Treetop expects the first rule to be the "main rule". It doesn't try to apply all the rules you defined until one matches - it only applies the main rule and if that does not match, it fails. To do what you want, you need to add a main rule which might be a num or an identifier, like this: grammar RCFAE rule expression num / identifier end ...


6

Good question. Start by separating your first ident from everything else, since it gets special treatment (no parentheses). Next, defer to a rule to handle the spaces ident recursion that will collect the values that go inside parentheses. The loop wraps the ident text and appends any new text that is collected recursively. Here is a short-hand version of ...


6

In your grammar you have: argument <- variable / lowercase /number / string function <- {|lowercase {|(open argument (separator (argument / function))* close)?|}|} Keep in mind that lpeg tries to match the patterns/predicates in the rule in the order you have it. Once it finds a match lpeg won't consider further possible matches in that grammar ...


6

OMeta2 supports left recursion, both direct and indirect. Read section 3 of Alessandro Warth's PhD thesis, Experimenting with Programming Languages for details. (But see Laurence Tratt's analysis of when OMeta can't handle left recursion properly.)


5

In general you'd get very good parsing performance from a shift-reduce parser such as the one that Jison implements. It's a bit old-school perhaps, but it can work in very tight memory requirements and in linear time. PEG produces a different kind of parser that is perhaps more capable, but would require more memory to produce the same result. I.e. PEG will ...


5

Something like this ought to do it: expression = bool_expression bool_expression = add_expression "==" bool_expression / add_expression "!=" bool_expression / add_expression add_expression = mult_expression "+" add_expression / mult_expression "-" add_expression / mult_expression mult_expression = atom "*" mult_expression / atom "/" ...


5

If I understand correctly, your problem isn't left recursion, it's the structure of the parse tree. You've eliminated the left recursion properly, but unfortunately, the only way to get rid of left recursion is by eliminating left recursion in the raw parse tree. Most of the theory for this stuff is just about matching the right set of strings. You are ...


5

Use a grammar. With the use of Lua variables, it is possible to define patterns incrementally, with each new pattern using previously defined ones. However, this technique does not allow the definition of recursive patterns. For recursive patterns, we need real grammars. LPeg represents grammars with tables, where each entry is a rule. The call ...


5

(author of grappa here...) OK, so, what you seem to want is in fact a parse tree. Very recently there has been an extension to grappa (2.0.x+) developed which can answer your needs: https://github.com/ChrisBrenton/grappa-parsetree. Grappa, by default, only "blindly" matches text and has a stack at its disposal, so you could have, for instance: public ...


5

From your spec in the question and comments, I think your code is close - but you don't want the csl. I've put the code I think you want below (it may not be the most elegant implementation, but I think it's reasonable). You have to avoid a potential problem that BooleanLiteral is a subset of StringLiteral. This meant that you can't make the ...


5

First: your grammar is missing the number rule. Also, as I'm sure you're aware, running your grammar (after adding number) on your example does not give 2, but rather something like a parse tree. Would you mind updating the question to fix those two issues? Problem: It looks like you've run into associativity. Associativity comes into play when two ...


4

Boost.Spirit is a fantastic library that allows you to make detailed parser analysis, and since the parser is generated and compiled right into your code, should be much faster than a dynamically-calculated solution. The syntax is mostly done with expression templates (a fancy term for lots of overloaded operators), which means you actually write them right ...



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