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24

Here's some sample code I once wrote to do exactly that. First, you need to specify and install the performance counters in question. You can do this by using an Installer: public class CreditPerformanceMonitorInstaller : Installer { private PerformanceCounterInstaller counterInstaller_; public CreditPerformanceMonitorInstaller() { ...


20

Perfmon's counters are still a good technique (and free!). PAL (Performance Analysis of Logs), a free tool, has an ASP.NET perfmon counter template for general health (in addition to generating reports of counter log files based on thresholds). Check out: .NET Debugging Demos Lab 7: Memory Leak .NET Memory Leak Case Study: The Event Handlers That Made ...


19

To detect a memory leak using Performance Monitor, monitor these counters: The Memory/Available Bytes counter lets you view the total number of bytes of available memory. This value normally fluctuates, but if you have an application with the memory leak, it will decrease over time. TheMemory/Committed Bytes counter will steadily rise if a memory leak is ...


10

While an OS may defer actual allocation of dynamically allocated memory until it is used, the compiler optimizer may eliminate allocations that are only written to, and never read from. Because your writes have no well defined observable behaviour (you never read from it), the compiler may well optimize it away. I would suggest examing the generated assembly ...


9

Could be an overflow, but my money's on an underflow. I think that the program started with 0 people, someone logged off, and then the number of sessions went negative.


9

Well, 2^32 = 4,294,967,296, so sounds like there's some kind of overflow occurring. Can't say exactly why.


8

We have the same problem. It looks like MS has a Hotfix available: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/969722 Update 9/10/2009: Our IT department contacted MS for the Hotfix. It fixed our issue. We are running .NET 2.0 if it matters any.


7

Had the same problem. This was on a machine that had an NVidia Quadro 2000 card. Uninstalling the "NVidia WMI" product solved the issue... :)


6

Here is the MSDN listing of the important perfmon counters for IIS. If your site is restarting, you'll also want events from the Application and Security logs relating to IIS. You can also use IISState to generate a dumpfile if/when a crash does happen.


5

I found a way to solve the problem: copy C:\WINDOWS\system32\PerfStringBackup.INI from a PC where perfmon works correctly cd C:\WINDOWS\system32 lodctr /R:PerfStringBackup.INI


5

There's a tool called relog that can convert these files to csv or other formats. http://blog.bennett-scharf.com/2008/12/17/converting-an-existing-perfmon-blg-file-to-csv/ http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adcman/archive/2006/05/15/598149.aspx http://blogs.msdn.com/b/granth/archive/2008/09/23/relogging-perfmon-binary-log-files-to-sql.aspx


5

Perf counters and ETW are two different things, they share no underlying infrastructure. Counters are used to provide information as to how well the operating system or an application, service, or driver is performing. The counter data can help determine system bottlenecks and fine-tune system and application performance. The operating ...


5

Does your program happen to be a 32-bit program running on Windows 2008 R2 or another 64 bit windows OS? If so you may want to check that the service "Performance Counter DLL Host" is running. This service enables 64-bit and remote processes to query counters provided by 32-bit processes.


5

These metrics we watch to determine if requests are being serviced promptly and the volume is scaling linearly with the applied load: Queued Requests Current Requests Requests Executing Requests Succeeded Requests/sec We will also watch these to look for application problems Errors/sec Unhandled Execution Errors/sec To monitor the VM memory, we look ...


5

Fixed - for anyone that runs into this issue, hopefully this can help you.. Enabling Remote Registry fixed my first problem. The second issue, "No such interface supported" turned out to be permissions issues within the registry. Apparently the machine had some pretty obscure permissions set to specific registry keys a long time ago, which are now ...


5

This won't help for looking at historical data, but if you have access to the systems running Perfmon, you may want to look at Logman. With Logman you can set performance counters AND specify the output format, that way you can just chose a format that is easy to parse. See the -f option: -f { bin | bincirc | csv | tsv | SQL } : Specifies the file format ...


5

They are custom controls that are not available for external use, sorry.


4

I use the Performance Analysis of Logs (PAL) tool: http://pal.codeplex.com/ It's not an "official" Microsoft tool, but I believe the author works for Microsoft. The project seems to be fairly active. In addition to the canned threshold files provided (which are pretty good), you can write your own thresholds to analyze what your app needs. The generation ...


4

Take a look at logman.exe. You can use it to create countersets (if you already have a template definition) as well as to start/stop perfmon data collection. See this Overview of Performance Monitor for some information on security requirements of the account executing logman.exe. From .bat, MSBuild or Nant you can do something like: Logman start ...


4

This sounds like a good candidate for AverageTimer32. See this SO answer for more details.


4

A Service can be exposed via many endpoints. A service can contain many operations. Which counters you choose depends on what you want to monitor. For example: Are you interested in how many times the http endpoint is called Are you interested in how many times the TakeMoneyOutOfABankAccount is called Are you interested in how many times the ...


4

In .NET you will have to sample the counter yourself and write the sampled value to a file. However, the Win32 API has functions to do what you want. For an example of the native API see Writing Performance Data to a Log File. You could try to use p/invoke to call the API.


4

In Win32, Performance Counters work by having PerfMon load a DLL which provides the counter values. In .NET, this DLL is a stub which uses shared memory to communicate with a running .NET process. The process periodically pushes new values to the shared memory block, and the DLL makes them available as performance counters. So, basically, you're probably ...


4

You can use the Spy++ window finder tool (Spy++ is included with DevStudio) to find the window class names (and window boundaries). http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa266028(v=vs.60).aspx It shows that the overall window is a DirectUIHWND, the graphs are windows but the bars labelled CPU/Disk/Network, etc are not windows at all, the appear to be ...


4

As Doug T. pointed out earlier, I posted a helper class awhile ago to query the performance counter value. The usage of the class is pretty simple, all you have to do is to provide the string for the performance counter. http://askldjd.wordpress.com/2011/01/05/a-pdh-helper-class-cpdhquery/ However, the code I posted on my blog has been modified in practice. ...


4

I've spent some time researching this today, as I'm in a similar situation; I have a .coverage file generated by TFS, and VS 2012 Pro, and I can't view the file. As far as I can tell, the answer is "You need VS Premium or Ultimate to view .coverage files." I found http://reportgenerator.codeplex.com/, which generates reports based on XML-formatted coverage ...


4

Performance Counters are, ahem, not very well suited for tracking application-level metrics. In Linux/Unix world there's an excellent Graphite and StatsD combination, and we've ported it to .NET: Statsify. What it allows you is to collect all kinds of metrics from within your application: number of database queries, time it takes to invoke a Web Service, ...


3

If you prefer to use PerfMon, have a look at these performance counters.


3

Take a look at the different PerformanceCounterTypes. There are several types for calculating average time or count. You will also find some examples. Hope this helps.


3

Have you looked at the docs for System.Diagnostics.PerformanceCounter? I would expect them to give you a reasonable starting point.



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