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13

You could use a branchless trinary operator, sometimes called bitselect ( condition ? true : false). Just use it for the 2 members, defaulting to doing nothing. Don't worry about the extra operations, they are nothing compared to the if statement branching. bitselect implementation: inline static int bitselect(int condition, int truereturnvalue, int ...


6

C++ is a high-level language. Your assumption that control flow in the C++ source code translates into branching instructions is flawed. I don't have the definition of some types from your example, so I made a simple test program with similar conditional assignments: int g(int, int); int f(const int *arr) { int min = 10000, minIndex = -1; for ( int ...


4

For speed-glutton a <- 10 v <- sort(runif(1e7,0,1000)); Rcpp::cppFunction('int min_index(NumericVector v, double a) { NumericVector::iterator low=std::lower_bound (v.begin(), v.end(), a); return (low - v.begin()); }') microbenchmark::microbenchmark(which(v > a)[1], min_index(v, a), ...


4

This might go both ways, but I'd give the following structure a try: std::vector<float> centDists(num_centroids); //<-- one for each thread. for (size_t p=0; p<num_points; ++p) { Point& pt = points[p]; for (size_t c=0; c<num_centroids; ++c) { const float dist = ...; centDists[c]=dist; } pt.min_idx it= ...


4

According to performance which is faster It doesn't matter. Click events are human-generated, and so they're judged by human timescales, not computer timescales. You're never going to have a DOM structure so deep that there's a perceptible delay clicking on its deepest section but handling the click at the document level. There are several reasons to ...


3

Firstly, I'd suggest that before you try any code changes you look at the disassembly in an optimized build. Ideally you want to look at the profiler data at an assembly level. This can show up various things, for example: The compiler may not have generated an actual branch instruction. The line of code that has the bottleneck may have many more ...


3

Did you remember to compile with optimizations? Some compilers have an attribute to force inlining, even when the compiler doesn't want to: see this question. But it probably has already; you can try having your compiler output the assembly code and try to check for sure that way. It is not implausible that index calculations can be a significant fraction ...


2

There is uniroot. It is using bisection and is faster on much longer vectors. v <- c(1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34) a <- 15 root <- uniroot(f = function(x) v[x] - a, interval = c(1, length(v))) my_index <- floor(root$root)


2

Too bad we can't use SSE4.1, but very well then, SSE2 it is. I haven't tested this, just compiled it to see if there were syntax errors and to see whether the assembly made sense (it's mostly alright, though GCC spills min_index even with some xmm registers not used, not sure why that happens) int find_closest(float *x, float *y, float *z, ...


2

One possible micro-optimizations: Store min_dist and min_index in local variables. The compiler may have to write to memory more often the way you have it written; on some architectures this can have a big performance impact. See my answer here for another example. Adams's suggestion of doing 4 compares at once is also a good one. However, your best ...


2

Obviously, Ed's advice is far preferable, but if you don't want to follow that, I had a couple of thoughts... Thought 1 Rather than run echo 5 times and cat head.in onto the Glycine file, each of which causes the file to be opened, seeked (or sought maybe) to the end, and appended, you could do that in one go like this: # Instead of hmbi=3 echo "$hmbi" ...


1

I've started a project on GitHub to play with this. Initial results are surprisingly positive for Streams - for an identity map over strings, Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.25-b02, mixed mode) on 2014 MacBookAir 1.7Ghz i7, code version https://github.com/dmcg/iterables-v-streams#ea8498ee0627fc59834001a837fa92fba4bcf47ebcf47e Experiment ...


1

This actually depends on which part of reading it is taking 10 minutes. If it's actually reading from disk, then obviously any more compact form of the data will be better. If it's processing the CSV format (you can tell this because your CPU is at near 100% on one core while reading; it'll be very low for the other two), then you want a form that's ...


1

Given that your assets are large enough to take 0.5s to get copied, my suggestion would be to take a slightly different approach to quicken the (apparent) startup time: Create a plain old HTML page with placeholder divs for loading the assets (if you like, you can include small assets (e.g. load indicator images) in base64) Once that HTML loads (maybe on ...


1

As an application uses cpu, memory and disk all of these affect the execution speed of an application. In your case, you changed from a 4-core cpu that had 4 fast cores, to a 10-core cpu that has 10, but slower cores, effectively slowing down your per-thread execution speed. Depending on what you do, e.g. if the ratio of calculations/memory pressure is ...


1

As @user3528438 mentioned, you can look at the assembly output. Consider the following example: inline int sub2ind(const int sub_height, const int sub_width, const int width) { return sub_height * width + sub_width; } int main() { volatile int n[] = {1, 2, 3}; return sub2ind(n[0], n[1], n[2]); } Compiling it without optimization (g++ -S ...


1

use these commands in terminal- composer dump-autoload -o php artisan optimize -o flag create the optimized autoload file.


1

Here's a thorough article (which is dated early 2014) I am quoting Benjamin Poulain, a WebKit Engineer who had a lot to say about the CSS selectors performance test: ~10% of the time is spent in the rasterizer. ~21% of the time is spent on the first layout. ~48% of the time is spent in the parser and DOM tree creation ~8% is spent on style ...



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