Hot answers tagged

74

It looks like caching / prefetching effect. The clue is that you compare Doubles (objects), not doubles (primitives). When you allocate objects in one thread, they are typically allocated sequentially in memory. So when indexOf scans a list, it goes through sequential memory addresses. This is good for CPU cache prefetching heuristics. But after you sort ...


58

I think this one is a little bit opinion-based. But I will try to answer. I agree with Dietrich Epp: it's a combination of several things that make GHC fast. First and foremost, Haskell is very high-level. This enables the compiler to perform aggressive optimisations without breaking your code. Think about SQL. Now, when I write a SELECT statement, it ...


53

for($i = 0; $i <= count($data); $i++){} In this example for every iteration it has to count($data) again. for($i = 0, $iMax = count($data); $i <= $iMax; $i++){} In this example it only needs to count($data) once. That's the difference.


32

Adding a type signature dropped my runtime from 14.35 seconds to 0.27. It is now faster than the C++ on my machine. Don't rely on type-defaulting when performance matters. Ints aren't preferable for, say, modeling a domain in a web application, but they're great if you want a tight loop. module Main where summation :: Int -> Int -> Int summation ...


24

I think we are seeing the effect of memory cache misses: When you create the unsorted list for (int i = 0; i < LIST_LENGTH; i++) { list.add(r.nextDouble()); } all the double are most likely allocated in a contiguous memory area. Iterating through this will produce few cache misses. On the other hand in the sorted list the references point to ...


19

Yes. In the specific example where the same work occurs, a single loop is likely to be more efficient than looping over a set of data twice. But the idea of O(2n) ~ O(n) is that 2 ns vs 1 ns may not really matter. Big O works better to show how a piece of code might scale, e.g. if you made the loop O(n^2) then the difference of O(n) vs O(2n) is ...


18

For a long time it was thought that functional languages couldn't be fast -- and especially lazy functional languages. But this was because their early implementations were, in essence, interpreted and not genuinely compiled. A second wave of designs emerged based on graph reduction, and opened up the possibility for much more efficient compilation. Simon ...


14

Only the X4 column update depends on previous values, so the loop can be mostly 'vectorized' (with a little bit of optimization, avoiding addition of 1 to rind in each iteration) as rind1 <- rind + 1L for (i in seq_len(N)) x$X4[rind1[i]] <- x$X4[rind1[i]] + x$X4[rind[i]] x$X5[rind1] <- x$X4[rind1] * x$X3[rind1] x$X5[rind1] <- ...


14

One should always benchmark to be sure. But, ignoring the effects of cache for the moment, the efficiency can depend on how sporadically you access the two. Herein, consider char data_s[65536] and char *data_p = malloc(65536) If the access is sporadic the static/global will be slightly faster: // slower because we must fetch data_p and then store void ...


13

This is not a problem inherent to Redux IMHO. By the way, instead of trying to render 100k components at the same time, you should try to fake it with a lib like react-infinite or something similar, and only render the visible (or close to be) items of your list. Even if you succeed to render and update a 100k list, it's still not performant and it takes a ...


13

If you execute the count() inside your for loop, then it's executed every iteration, and calling the function is a performance overhead. If instead you call count() before the for loop and assign the result to a variable, then compare against the variable in the for loop, you don't haver the function call overhead, so it's faster


12

As per the docs: public boolean add(E e) Adds the specified element to this set if it is not already present. More formally, adds the specified element e to this set if this set contains no element e2 such that (e==null ? e2==null : e.equals(e2)). If this set already contains the element, the call leaves the set unchanged and returns false. So the ...


11

So the trouble is, these benchmarks measure different things: get() from a populated map, and remove() from an (eventually) empty map. The comparison is meaningless, and you may throw the benchmark away. You have to guarantee the operation is done against the same HashMap. Unfortunately, that requires either using @Setup(Invocation), which is bad on its own ...


11

There is no "problem". Being able to optimize away useless code is one of the key features of C++. As the inner loop does nothing, it should be removed by every sane compiler. Tip of the day: Only profile meaningful code that does something. If you want to learn something about micro-benchmarks, you might be interested in this.


11

By having the loop in the manner you do, each iteration it needs to evaluate count($data). If you've got a lot of items in the list, it could take a while (relatively) to count those items, and it has to do it each time. The hint it is diving you is to set a variable to the value of count($data) at the beginning and then use that variable as the loop ...


10

performance.now() is the best option to measure performance. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Performance/now end time calculation is wrong. in your mprofile function you calculate a diff BEFORE calling the first console.log, in ordinary code - AFTER the second one. so, in one case you include interaction with console into your ...


9

Compare with the API documentation of Set.add(E) The add method checks if the element is already in the Set. If the element is already present, then the new element is not added, and the Set remains unchanged. In most situations, you don't need to check anything. The complexity of the method depends of the concrete implementation of Set that you are using. ...


9

As noted by @joran, your code is very specialized, and generally speaking, less generalized functions, algorithms, etc... are often more performant. Take a look at median.default: median.default # function (x, na.rm = FALSE) # { # if (is.factor(x) || is.data.frame(x)) # stop("need numeric data") # if (length(names(x))) # names(x) <- NULL ...


9

The problem is in your benchmark: you are the victim of dead code elimination. JIT-compiler is quite smart to understand sometimes that the result of automatic boxing is never null, so for anonymous class it simply removed your check which in turn made the loop body almost empty. Replace it with something less obvious (for JIT) like this: public void ...


9

Look at prefix tree (Trie) data structure. During scanning the tree, always remember the last best result (remember 34, while checking 34*** nodes) There are many implementations of tries in Python


8

Combine index and data into a single array. Then use some cache-friendly sorting algorithm to sort these pairs (by index). Then get rid of indexes. (You could combine merging/removing indexes with the first/last pass of the sorting algorithm to optimize this a little bit). For cache-friendly O(N) sorting use radix sort with small enough radix (at most half ...


8

You appear to have a mixed up both using a thread pool and creating threads of your own. I suggest you use on or the other. In fact I suggest you only use the fixed thread pool Most likely what is happening is your threads are getting an exception which is being lost but killing the task which kills the thread. I suggest you just the the thread pool, don't ...


8

First of all micro-optimzation such this one are irrelevant until you prove they're relevant. Regarding your specific question at least two possible compiler optimization comes into my mind: Loop unrolling, which basically translates your loop into a version without the loop at all, and it could possibly easily be applied to your case Automatic ...


8

I find this problem interesting. GCC is known for producing less than optimal code, but I find it fascinating to find ways to "encourage" it to produce better code (for hottest/bottleneck code only, of course), without micro-managing too heavily. In this particular case, I looked at three "tools" I use for such situations: volatile: If it is important ...


7

data = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7] index = [5, 1, 4, 0, 2, 3] We want to create a new array from elements of data at position from index. Result should be result -> [4, 2, 5, 7, 3, 1] Single thread, one pass I think, for a few million elements and on a single thread, the naive approach might be the best here. Both data and index are ...


7

You can obtain your result without using sapply since qbeta is vectorized. We repeat the grid values nrow(df) times. At the end, you obtain a matrix whose rows are the values of qbeta for the corresponding row of data. Notice: this can be slow given the huge amount of time. Don't think you can speed up things considerably from here, unless you parallelize or ...


7

Because I'm also learning Julia, I have tried possible speed up of OP's code (for my practice!). And it seems that the bottleneck is essentially the underlying Fortran code. To verify this, I first rewrote the OP's code to a minimal form as follows: using Dierckx function perf() Nx = 300 xinp = Float64[ 2pi * i / Nx for i = 1:Nx ] yinp = ...


7

Given an item... { A = 1, B = 2, C = 3 } You have 3 possible combinations that could be repeated in another item, e.g. AB, AC & BC which is {1, 2}, {1, 3} & {2, 3} So what I would do is iterate through your list, add those combinations to a dictionary with a separator char (lowest number first so if B < A then add BA rather than AB). So you ...


7

The second case does not preserve the order of the elements in the vector. If this is a sorted vector or the order is important then you have just broken that in the second case where the first case would leave the order intact.


7

As a simple example that confirms the answer by wero and the answer by apangin (+1!): The following does a simple comparison of both options: Creating random numbers, and sorting them optionally Creating sequential numbers, and shuffling them optionally It is also not implemented as a JMH benchmark, but similar to the original code, with only slight ...



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