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1917

Pure speculation is that you're using a terminal that attempts to do word-wrapping rather than character-wrapping, and treats B as a word character but # as a non-word character. So when it reaches the end of a line and searches for a place to break the line, it sees a # almost immediately and happily breaks there; whereas with the B, it has to keep ...


389

PyPy, as others have been quick to mention, has tenuous support for C extensions. It has support, but typically at slower-than-Python speeds and it's iffy at best. Hence a lot of modules simply require CPython. Cython and Numpy are awesome for numerics, and most people who actually need speed in Python are using those (+ Pandas, SciPy, etc.) heavily. Since ...


262

I often heard that people prefer C++ to C# mainly in the performance critical code,because the GC might turn up on critical path, causing the performance penalty. I have heard that in some circles but never respectable circles. For example, I consulted for a company in London who were selling stock exchange software that had been written in 1,000,000 ...


175

TL;DR The actual speed difference is closer to 70% (or more) once a lot of the overhead is removed, for Python 2. Object creation is not at fault. Neither method creates a new object, as one-character strings are cached. The difference is unobvious, but is likely created from a greater number of checks on string indexing, with regards to the type and ...


172

I can reproduce your results on my machine with those options you write in your post. However, if I also enable link time optimization (I also pass the -flto flag to gcc 4.7.2), the results are identical: (I am compiling your original code, with container.push_back(Item());) $ g++ -std=c++11 -O3 -flto regr.cpp && perf stat -r 10 ./a.out ...


163

By default compilers optimize for "average" processor. Since different processors favor different instruction sequences, compiler optimizations enabled by -O2 might benefit average processor, but decrease performance on your particular processor (and the same applies to -Os). If you try the same example on different processors, you will find that on some of ...


115

One way to avoid branch prediction errors is to build a lookup table, and index it using the data. Stefan de Bruijn discussed that in his answer. But in this case, we know values are in the range [0, 255] and we only care about values >= 128. That means we can easily extract a single bit that will tell us whether we want a value or not: by shifting the ...


113

In the sorted case, you can do better than relying on successful branch prediction or any branchless comparison trick: completely remove the branch. Indeed, the array is partitioned in a contiguous zone with data < 128 and another with data >= 128. So you should find the partition point with a dichtomic search (using Lg(arraySize) = 15 comparisons), ...


106

The most likely cause of the speed improvement is that: inserting a MOV shifts the subsequent instructions to different memory addresses one of those moved instructions was an important conditional branch that branch was being incorrectly predicted due to aliasing in the branch prediction table moving the branch eliminated the alias and allowed the branch ...


105

First of all: A do-while loop is not the same as a while-loop or a for-loop. while and for loops may not run the loop body at all. A do-while loop always runs the loop body at least once - it skips the initial condition check. So that's the logical difference. That said, not everyone strictly adheres to this. It is quite common for while or for loops to ...


102

tl;dr Swift without aggressive compiler optimizations at this stage is very slow; with them it is very fast. Keep it in mind. Here is an in-place quicksort in Swift: func quicksort_swift(inout a:CInt[], start:Int, end:Int) { if (end - start < 2){ return } var p = a[start + (end - start)/2] var l = start var r = end - 1 ...


68

You may want to read http://research.google.com/pubs/pub37077.html TL;DR: randomly inserting nop instructions in programs can easily increase performance by 5% or more, and no, compilers cannot easily exploit this. It's usually a combination of branch predictor and cache behaviour, but it can just as well be e.g. a reservation station stall (even in case ...


63

HHVM engineer here. In server mode, HHVM will run the first N requests it sees in interpreter-only mode (i.e. with the JIT off). The default in an optimized build is N=11, so if you were to run the request 12 times, the 12th one would be much faster. You can tune this with a config option, like so: -v Eval.JitWarmupRequests=3. If you set it to 0, ...


63

Well, OP's benchmarking is not the ideal one. Tons of effects need to be mitigated, including warmup, dead code elimination, forking, etc. Luckily, JMH already takes care of many things, and has bindings for both Java and Scala. Please follow the procedures on JMH page to get the benchmark project, then you can transplant the benchmarks below there. This is ...


60

using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Diagnostics; using System.Linq; using System.Security.Cryptography; namespace HashsetTest { abstract class HashLookupBase { protected const int BucketCount = 16; private readonly HashAlgorithm _hasher; protected HashLookupBase() { _hasher = ...


60

Your routine only handles ASCII characters. The system one handles all unicode characters. Consider following example: public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println((int) 'ě'); // => 283 System.out.println((int) 'Ě'); // => 282 } }


58

This is a classic java benchmarking issue. Hotspot/JIT/etc will compile your code as you use it, so it gets faster during the run. Run around the loop at least 3000 times (10000 on a server or on 64 bit) first - then do your measurements.


56

My JVM does this pretty straightforward thing to the inner loop when you use longs: 0x00007fdd859dbb80: test %eax,0x5f7847a(%rip) /* fun JVM hack */ 0x00007fdd859dbb86: dec %r11 /* i-- */ 0x00007fdd859dbb89: mov %r11,0x258(%r10) /* store i to memory */ 0x00007fdd859dbb90: test %r11,%r11 /* unnecessary test */ ...


56

Your method is incorrect in many ways. For instance, it considers "!" equal to "B", "B" equal to "1", but "!" not equal to "1" (so it isn't transitive as we would expect an equals method to be). Yes, it is quite easy to write an incorrect implementation for that method that is both faster and simpler. A fair challenge would be to write a correct one, i.e. ...


55

That site does not claim PyPy is 6.3 times faster than CPython. To quote: The geometric average of all benchmarks is 0.16 or 6.3 times faster than CPython This is a very different statement to the blanket statement you made, and when you understand the difference, you'll understand at least one set of reasons why you can't just say "use PyPy". It might ...


47

The String generated for iteration 1 is no longer needed in iteration 2 and its storage space can be freed. I believe that is not happening here. It definitely is happening. You're creating 100 million strings, each of which is at least 13 characters - and most of which will be about 20 characters. Each string consists of an object (which has overhead) ...


46

TL;DR: Yes, the only Swift language implementation is slow, right now. If you need fast, numeric (and other types of code, presumably) code, just go with another one. In the future, you should re-evaluate your choice. It might be good enough for most application code that is written at a higher level, though. From what I'm seeing in SIL and LLVM IR, it ...


45

Note that Git 1.9/2.0 (Q1 2014) has removed that limitation. See commit 82fba2b, from Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy (pclouds): Now that git supports data transfer from or to a shallow clone, these limitations are not true anymore. The documentation now reads: --depth <depth>:: Create a 'shallow' clone with a history truncated to the specified number ...


42

I have rewritten this answer as I was first summing all bytes, this is however incorrect as Java has signed bytes, hence I need to or. Also I have changed the JVM warmup to be correct now. Your best bet really is to simply loop over all values. I suppose you have three major options available: Or all elements and check the sum. Do branchless comparisons. ...


41

The differences found by your sample program has nothing to do with lists or their structure. It's because in C#, strings are a reference type, whereas in C++ code, you are using them as a value type. For example: string a = "foo bar baz"; string b = a; Assigning b = a is just copying the pointer. This follows through into lists. Adding a string to a ...


39

Because pypy is not 100% compatible, takes 8 gigs of ram to compile, is a moving target, and highly experimental, where cpython is stable, the default target for module builders for 2 decades (including c extensions that don't work on pypy), and already widely deployed. Pypy will likely never be the reference implementation, but it is a good tool to have.


38

People often talk about performance, reads vs. writes, foreign keys, etc. but there's one other must-have feature for a storage engine in my opinion: atomic updates. Try this: Issue an UPDATE against your MyISAM table that takes 5 seconds. While the UPDATE is in progress, say 2.5 seconds in, hit Ctrl-C to interrupt it. Observe the effects on the table. ...


37

This sort of statement is ridiculous; people making it are either incredibly uninformed, or incredibly dishonest. In particular: The speed of dynamic memory allocation in the two cases will depend on the pattern of dynamic memory use, as well as the implementation. It is trivial for someone familiar with the algorithms used in both cases to write a ...


34

Use constructor to convert it: List<?> list = new ArrayList(set);


33

Here's a good mnemonic. Apply uses Arrays and Always takes one or two Arguments. When you use Call you have to Count the number of arguments.



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