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use try-catch like this: var counter = new PerformanceCounter{}; counter.CategoryName = "Process"; counter.CounterName = "% Processor Time"; counter.InstanceName = someProcessName; try { if ( PerformanceCounterCategory.InstanceExists( someProcessName, "Process" ) ) { // For any reason the process terminates EXACTLY at this point ...


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Look at MSDN - InvalidOperationException is throwed when The instance is not correctly associated with a performance counter. PerformanceCounter.NextValue Method Try to initialize your counter with RawValue property: // Initialize the counter. counter.RawValue = Stopwatch.GetTimestamp(); If this won't help - check if category and counter names are valid ...


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It seems like reading performance counters over a network is simply not super reliable. I've decided to use the Microsoft Transient Fault Handling library (v 6.0, search topaz on nuget) and implemented a retry strategy. Usually one retry is enough to get a valid answer (no exeception), sometimes it might take 2 retries. I implemented a transient fault ...


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I think the issue here may be that you are not taking into account that your system has multiple cores. You will need to divide the percentages by the number of cores available on the system. Take a look at the link below. http://www.allenconway.net/2013/07/get-cpu-usage-across-all-cores-in-c.html


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Currently, custom performance counters are not supported in Azure Websites.


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I encountered this error while migrating to a Azure VM. Solved it by using the InstallUtil which is located in the Framework64 folder instead of the one in the Framework folder


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QueryPerformanceCounter leads to a call inside the OAL (part of the BSP) where the highest-resolution progressive counter available in the system should be used to return a 64 bits value. Looks like an issue with that specific BSP. On x86 the amount of HW timers is limited and it may be that some drivers are using the counter that is used by ...


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Services typically run as Network Service or Local System, unless you have configured them overwise. It sounds like you haven't changed the service logon user. You can do it from service control manager by right clicking the service and going to the Logon tab. Or you can do it from the command line: sc config ServiceName obj= Domain\user password= pass ...


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Counter Value: 6536266821 Counter Value: 6536266262 Counter Value: 6536266604 even the third read is smaller than the first! But what is the relevance here? You should read the performance counter frequency using QueryPerformanceFrequency() to investigate what a difference of a few hundred counts actually means. With a frequence in the MHz ...


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Simply put, there are a small number of cpu cores in the system, yet there are a large number of processes running simultaneously. In order to achieve this, the OS will allocate time to a process before doing the same for the next one and so on. Depending on what programs are doing, they may need none-of, some-of or all-of their time-slice. As this varies, ...


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For what it's worth, based on Gaurav Mantri's comment this is the list that I get from my Web role. This is the output of typeperf -q. I assume different Azure roles have different counters, and they may even vary between Web roles. Ours is a Medium size. The list is too big for a post on SO, so here's a github gist: ...


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Are you using your own performance counters? We had the same exception in one of our applications, which created performance counters, but didn't dispose them properly. Be aware that calling PerformanceCounter.Dispose() is not enough - it just inherits from Component.Dispose() and adds no additional functionality. So always call ...


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Under what circumstances does QueryPerformanceFrequency return FALSE, or QueryPerformanceCounter return zero? This won't occur on any system that runs Windows XP or later. That is correct, perhaps with the slight change in phrasing: This can occur on any system that runs Windows XP or later. There are circumstances where ...


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You can create a user defined data set (under Data Collector Sets) and limit your performance counters for a specific process. Once you select a process object, choose what process you want to monitor and the counters for that specific process.


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SSAS on a 64bit environment installs only the 64bit counter's library so, if you run your code from a 32bit application or you are using 32bit version of Windows PerfMon, you can not access those counters. On a 64-bit platform you have both versions of Windows Perfmon. 32bit -> C:\Windows\SysWOW64\perfmon.exe 64bit -> C:\Windows\System32\perfmon.exe ...


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Your problem with processor time is you are not supposed to use RawValue on it (you really should not use it for working set either). For processor time you must take two samples calling NextValue, One you get a 2nd sample you will have accurate numbers. PerformanceCounterCategory perfCategory = PerformanceCounterCategory.GetCategories().First(c => ...



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